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Hi All,

I'm thinking of lightening my backpacking equipment. Wouldn’t go into the woods without a fixed blade. Currently I carry an Ontario Spec Plus Air Force survival knife. I'm thinking of giving the spec plus to my son (he drools over it) and getting the Mora 2000.

A lot of good reviews ... don’t know if they are really that good or just a popularity issue. Kind of a strange grind ?? Also They might be a little light ... but I guess that's why I'm looking at them.



Thanks,
Tim
 

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Mora knives are very light. I don't have the 2000, but I have a wood-handled version and a "Viking" plastic-handled version. Even the cheapest Moras have very good blades and are super sharp off the shelf. I use a Mora as my main small fixed-blade. I have heard many stories about what people have used their Moras for, and even Bushcraft-guru Mors Kochanski swears by them. I personally do not beat the heck out of them (though there are many who do). I use them for carving and small cutting tasks, but I have batoned with them before. If you're looking for a small, light verstile fixed blade to pair with a hatchet/large knife/axe, you really can't go wrong with a Mora.
 

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I got this one.
Amazon.com: New Swedish Mil. Mora Knife: Sports & Outdoors

It's VERY light. It's so light the blade is SLIGHTLY flexible. Not very much but just a bit. It's possibly the sharpest knife off the shelf I've ever seen and the tip is needle fine. I plan on using it for fish and smaller stuff. I have a larger, heavier fixed blade I use for everything else.

I really like this Mora. It's extremely comfortable to use and a great size for a small fixed blade. Very sharp and easy to use for finer tasks.
 

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In 1996 I actually got to spend a day with Mors, I was in Canada with the army at the time. He uses those knives pretty hard by my standards and the one he had worked great. I bought six last year from Sportsmen's Guide and have no complaints. I ended up giving away three as presents. The only problem, well not really a problem, is they will rust if not cared for. i don't consider it an issue, I just hit them with some oil every now and then.
 

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I own quite a few Moras, but not a 2000. Now this one won;t rust easily, it's Sandvik 12C27 stainless. I've never handled a 2000, but I've seen close-up pictures and it's got a very strange, somewhat cool, blade profile with a multi-faceted primary grind.

I've heard a couple or more people say they think it's Mora's best knife. I don;t know about that, because the 510 or one of the 700 series gets alot of attention too, plus they're a third of the cost almost. The 2000 sells for about $30.

If you never owned one, maybe consider one of their $10 or $12 knives. The 2000 has the same blade thickness (.098 - that's roughly a tad under 3/32") as many of the others, though some are a little slimmer. Maybe start with a 911 or an 840 (one of my favorites, the CLipper), or any 700, 800, or 900 series Mora.

I mean, you could just jump right in on a 2000, but at $30, if it doesn;t suit your fancy, you might forego all the rest of the Moras, and that wouldn;t be good! ((( :D )))

Top to bottom: #780 Craftsman; #946; #840 Clipper (carbon steel); #510 carbon


Now, the two carbon blades come shiny, but I used a vinegar mixture on them to force a patina. The 2000 will come shiny and stay that way. ALl the Moras I've ordered (probably about 12) come razor sharp.... I mean very sharp, except for two #510's which, while sharp, wouldn;t scare me, so they needed work.

Helix, they are indeed light. These are short-tanged, thin knives with plastic handles. Maybe they're a novelty, but they are for a reason, when you get yours I think you'll see why. They're highly functional, very sharp, light, and CHEAP! ((( :D ))) BUT!: They're not the knife you're probably used to carrying. I mean, most people when first seeing a Mora think it's a toy. Wrong!

The sheaths are cheap, but very functional. I've given several away. My br-in-law keeps his on his boat and uses it fishing. My wife keeps hers in the kitchen drawer and uses it all the time. My daughter (10) carries hers in her backpack (she can gather, prep, and start her own fire with nothing more than her #740camo and a firesteel). I keep a #510 in each of our vehicles, usually in the door "pocket". All my packs, including 3 BOBs each have a Mora of one model or another. A couple guys at work (who normally scoff at anything that's not Benchmade or Dozier) bought some Moras (one guy has bought 2 more that I know of).

In short: they're not the Buck or Busse or BM or CRK you're used to carrying, but you can carry them or store them strategically. They'll do whatever needs to be cut.

Regarding the strange grind - that's a Scandinavian grind. It really only has one grind, in contrast to 2 grinds on most knives. The Scandi grind is easy to sharpen on a flat stone (I use a waterstone 800) and maybe a Sharpmaker (I take a few very light passes on the fine stones after sharpening on the waterstone. Then I strop. Very sharp knives and easy to maintain. The Scandi grind has become my favorite grind, replacing the convex grind, for me.

They'll be different for you. Again I suggest.... try one of the cheaper ones first..... maybe.
 

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Great replies. I think the one I bought that I linked above is the same as that clipper you posted a picture of. I think it's just a different company or whatever that puts it out. It's the same carbon steel I know. Excellent knife for what it's made for.
 

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I went and read that article you linked, Smoke. Pretty good review from Cliff Stamp. I never see that guy in the knife forums anymore. He does excellent write-ups - a college professor he is, I think.

You might have bought a Hultafors, if they make a version of the Clipper. Maybe that's why it appears different. Maybe you didn;t, I'm just guessing.

I went back up and found your other link - to the knife you got through Amazon. That's the same thing as the one in my picture, but you may have bought it earlier or later than I did mine, and maybe there were some handle color variations or something. Frosts and Eriksson are now all Mora of Sweden. So, same thing.
 

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I do not own one, but the reviews I have read have been positive. In fact I cannot recall anyone complaining about a Mora knife.
 

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It's hard to complain about a knife that does what it's supposed to do well and costs 10 to 12 dollars. :D
I love mine.

I agree you should try one of the clipper style moras before you drop 30 bucks on the 2000.
 
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