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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i read alot about folks storing various grains and i admit i have neglected this area of my food stores. i am curious what sort of baking devices folks have in mind if they are in a situation without electricity or gas and need to bake up some of those whole grains? or in the alternative, other interesting ways to use the grains in food preparation.

i might add that i have previously built an oven from a 55 gallon drum barrel, rocks (large) and clay (wood fire underneath) but this was a real task requiring a truck to haul rocks and not something i plan to repeat (although it worked great) unless i absolutely have to.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Closed for the Season.
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15,784 Posts
I recently bought a oven that sits on top of a stove like a wood stove or coleman burner. After much looking about I found that by using bake trays and muffin tins designed for toaster ovens they will fit inside of it. These you can order from Amazon. One of the people on this site recommended the stove in a thread that I found by searching. Do not recall it just at the moment.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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68,554 Posts
There are a lot of options in flat breads that don't require an oven. Nearly every culture has at least one version of them. Some are quite tasty. They also use a lot less fuel than baking. And there's fresh pasta as well. Plus all the other things you can do with wheat such at hot cereals, dry cereals, gravies and sauces, etc.

As for actual baking, you have a number of options too. Solar ovens work great during sunny days. They use no fuel and keep scent down. And you can get camp ovens for use over a number of different cooking systems. Coleman makes one, but this place makes the nicest one I've seen. http://www.kerostove.com

You can also cook breads and biscuits in cast iron dutch ovens, and flat breads and pizza crusts on charcoal grills.
 

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Ham Extra Class
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3,267 Posts
I plan on using my regular electric oven I have now in my house.
I have a generator backup on my house and it can run the stove with no problem. I also have alot of gas stored up to run the generator, I will have to cook with the stove when the generator is running and I have it planed out to only run the generator about 4 to 5 hours per day so as to save on fuel.
If the SHTF goes into a really long time, then I'm screwed on having an oven.
 

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Where grain is concerned, I do a lot more sprouting than I do baking. However, a good and serviceable dutch oven handles baking needs for a man alone, as I am, and there is little need for anything beyond that. If I need better, we have plenty of sandstone, and I have red clay mud to use to mortar it with, so a dome oven is feasible.
 

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At Sugent
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1,139 Posts
I plan on using my regular electric oven I have now in my house.
I have a generator backup on my house and it can run the stove with no problem. I also have alot of gas stored up to run the generator, I will have to cook with the stove when the generator is running and I have it planed out to only run the generator about 4 to 5 hours per day so as to save on fuel.
If the SHTF goes into a really long time, then I'm screwed on having an oven.
This is off topic but I think it's important enough to make a comment.
4 or 5 hours of electricity is all you need to run your entire house.
You can keep your food frozen in your chest freezer, and your stuff cold in your refrigerator because they really only run 4 or 5 hours a day anyway.
It can be all at once, or better still, an hour or two in the morning and the balance at night.
I have been living on my genset for 3 years now.
We also have several battery chargers attached to deep cycle batteries to power things like our water pump and lights during the off times.
We burn about 2 to 2.5 gallons of diesel a day. Small price to be off the grid.
 

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Trail walker
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35 Posts
I'd like to suggest looking into a hay box or straw box. It's nothing more than a well insulated box that you'll place your covered cooking pot into once it has reached optimum cooking temperature (like boiling) to then continue cooking by trapping heat in the hay box. You then can place the next cooking pot on the burner/stove to start cooking that batch without expending as much fuel as cooking both meals seperately.
I'm installing one in my kitchen for general usage so I can cook and keep the main dishes warm while I finish cooking the side dishes instead of running several burners at once.
 
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