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Personal experiences only. No politics, judgment, advice, etc. please.

Might be interesting to hear other's day to day stories now that the Pandemic is in full swing....so we can look back on what happened or pass the time while waiting this thing out.

When I heard there was going to be a White House announcement at 3pm yesterday I figured it would be the state of emergency announcement so I went to the grocery store <1 mile from home to stock up some fresh fruits and veggies, maybe top off the almost full gas tank, and to be honest, mostly watch what was going on.

It was busy, but still courteous. The store is an upper middle class area with lots of elderly so it was a bit frustrating trying to navigate the aisles of lady's strolling along like it was a Sunday morning shopping trip mixed in with the crowd rushing to get those last minute items. The line for a single register was was all the way down an aisle so I thought about just leaving because I already had mostly everything I needed at home. But kingsford charcoal was on sale so I grabbed a few bags and some veggies and got in line. A 40ish "Yoga Mom" filed in behind me and asked with a big smile "what's your guess on how long this will take?". I guessed 15 minutes because most carts were less than full. She was less optimistic. We began to chat and from the cart in front of me a distinguished elderly voice broke in our conversation: "Back in 1968...."

Our new grocery line friend is a grey-haired fox who goes into her personal story of her getting the "Hong Kong Flu" when she had small children and several other stories about her being a Navy Chief's wife and family hardships over the years. "What time is it?" Yoga Mom asks. 20 minutes. Half way there.

Yoga Mom reveals that she is an ICU nurse but her middle school kids are going to be out of school next week. She also talks about the low supplies she has at work and her concerns of being made to stay at work if things get bad with kids at home.

We finally get to the register. Grey Fox is having trouble finding her bags that she swore she brought. Then certain items were giving her a hard time because she doesn't remember grabbing them. She asks several times where the divider is between our groceries, counts certain things, wants certain things removed because they are not hers......The ICU nurse gives me a concerned look . This goes on for several minutes and now the cashier and bagger are concerned as well. She forgets how to operate the card reader,....she seems to be mentally shutting down.

"It has been nice talking to you, can I help you put these in your car?" I ask. She declines. Her face is solemn and concerned. ICU nurse and I exchange glances. Register Lady looks concerned as well. I paid for my few items and rushed out of the store to see if I could follow Grey Fox.

At this point the parking lot was becoming chaotic. I spotted Grey Fox going to her car, then pause, then go to the next aisle of cars, then pause, and return to the same aisle. She was lost.

"Hey! Is she Okay?". ICU Nurse came up behind me and also concerned while watching Grey Fox circle the parking lot.. We put our carts together out of the way and ICU Nurse stood watch while I ran to Grey Fox.

"Hi again, what car are you looking for?". Her stare is blank and confused. I wonder if she remembers who I am. "Red Camry" she replies almost monotone. I run through a few aisles and return. "No Red Camry. Is it a different color?". She insists that it is red but not sure if it is a Camry. I ask to see her key fob. It is a Ford. She pushed the button several times and a dark red Ford Focus blinks it's lights an aisle over. She seems relieved but somewhat still confused.

"Let me put these bags in your car", I press. Her face became stern and she insists that she can do it herself. I can see she is embarrassed and I hesitate to push further.

I return to my cart and ICU Nurse and we talk for a moment while watching Grey Fox load her trunk with grocery bags. We say a hesitant farewell and return to our cars. The entire 5 minutes driving home I can't shake the notion that Grey Fox is NOT going to be okay. I put my few groceries away and then on my way to go upstairs I instead put on my shoes and bolt out of the door and run back to the store. When I get to the parking space where Grey Fox was last it is another car. I scan the exits to the parking lot but she is nowhere to be seen.

I have never dealt with someone with dementia or memory loss so this one is sticking with me for a bit. We celebrated a birthday today with family and lots of food, drinks, and comfort. Still thinking about Grey Fox though.

Interesting times.
 

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So far only my shopping trip last night. I shop an all night store.( Winco) because I work graveyard, I am up in the wee hours. Went shopping at 11 pm. Very crowded with panic buyers and many sections stripped bare. The store is more crowded lately because the Walmart stopped being 24 hours due to homeless problems.

It hasn't affected me personally as I am somewhat prepared already.

I do have friends in their late 70s with health problems and no kids in state. She was texting me tonight with various problems as I have been not doing my weekly trip to their house. Don't want to chance it. He has dementia, diabetes and other problems. She is starting to slow down a bit. She had trouble getting his insulin. Had to go to another place just to get partial supply. She was trying to get gloves. Told her try that auto parts store. Their Church is closed for the month, and she is going stir crazy.

Won't bore you with all her tales. Myself, I'm doing fine. The old couple is doing ok for now. If I don't get sick, I will still be effected indirectly by dropping supplies off on their porch.
 

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Republic of Texas
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I ran to one of the main stores four or five days ago. Panic buying wasn't real heavy here at the time, but was beginning to kick up so the store was busier than usual. I had one of my 15 year old's with me to give a bit of help.

As I'm looking through the bacon for the specific brand that was on sale, I noticed an older woman on a motorized scooter looking for the same thing.

Neither of us could even find the spot where it went on the shelf so we both went our own way.

As I was looking through the rest of the meat section, I came across the bacon - oddly placed, dead center of the meat section and fully stocked. The limit was 2 per person so I grabbed 4 packs, put 2 in my cart and handed the others to my daughter.

Pointed out the woman on the scooter and sent the kid down with the bacon to give it to her since she was rapidly disappearing from view.

I made my way down toward them just as the kid reached her.

We stood there and talked for a few minutes. She's disabled and living on a fixed income, but had been watching the news and was trying to get ahead of the game by doing some grocery shopping early. She thanked us profusely and said that those 2 packs of bacon would be four meals for her; six if she was careful with it.

I'm assuming she's not eating anything else with the bacon.

She seemed like a really nice lady. I've thought about her several times since then. Hope she does okay.
 

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We've been experiencing racism as Asian Americans. We live in a mix community in the SF bay area. I've only experienced racism 1 other time during my entire adult life. That was in the hood by a group of 25+ gang members standing outside of an apt complex while making a delivery.

Today like every other Sunday, 65 y/o mother goes to church then walks next door to the strip mall where is a large Hispanic grocery store. Its very convenient for her. Produce and shelves were cleared and everyone has their shopping carts filled. Lines are long.

My mother only needs a few produce items today. She couldn't find what she needed. Goes in line to pay for some oranges and carrots. Elderly Hispanic man in front of her ask her if she was Chinese. I didn't know about this because I was in the parking lot parking the car and only come in when she is in line so I can pay for the items. She told me about this on the drive home and laughed about it. I did get an uncomfortable feeling while in the line. I have been getting stares/glares while at shops topping off my preps, always by 2 certain minority groups. I've been laughing on the inside because I love seeing the general population in panic while knowing at home, I'm squared away :D: I love apocalyptic films and still watch the Walking Dead. We haven't seen panic buying in California before. We don't get snow storms, hurricanes, floods, etc. Just earthquakes which are overdue and reason for my preps. I've been going to Costco and Walmart just to see the panic and what items people are buying.

But this is the last time I'm allowing her in that store :mad: The virus has been carried over here by business travelers and well to do people on holiday of all races.

We're Vietnamese Americans, been here for over 40 years and we haven't been out of the country in years. We haven't been around anyone who has the virus or has been outside of the country :headshake: Most Asian Americans have been way ahead of the general population in regards to the panic buying. We've been staying up with the news.

I started with extra preps in Jan. I saw reports of people shipping supplies to China from USA. I knew it was a matter of time before supplies gets wiped out. They've done this baby formula in the past. Ever since, I've been topping off my preps, filling in holes and buying stuff to give away. I have been giving away non food supply kits to elderly relatives and neighbors who can't get out or can't find certain items. Also gave a large kit to my niece's classroom.

My 89 y/o American neighbor lives alone and watches CNN all day. She is afraid to even leave the house to drag the garbage can down a few feet to the curb. My elderly aunt is the same way. I gave them both relief boxes which included hand sanitizer, few surgical mask, some N95 mask, disinfectant spray/wipes and Lysol spray. Neighbor was speechless and in disbelief to see the mask and especially the bottle of hand sanitizer :cool:

The next kit is going to the church for the priest. They'll be doing funerals, visiting the sick, etc. When this all boils over and life goes back to normal, people will remember the acts of kindness. Never did I imagine I would be a humanitarian prepper :confused: No one knows the extent of my preps, mums still the word.
 

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We have our first reported case in our county; an employee of the school system.

The four firefighters who responded to the distress call are self quarantined for 14 days. Several local churches held services over Facebook this morning.

I went out for some comfort foods on Friday morning and the Kroger was packed. I was trying to hold back a smile and keep from laughing while I waited in line. People with carts piled high and a concerned look in their eyes were moving all over the store. People were still polite, but you could feel an edge to things that was not far from panic.

I started prepping 10 years ago. I felt vindicated in my lifestyle choices at that moment.

Meant to add, we homeschool all our girls, another win for lifestyle choice.
 

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Just returned from a necessary family trip to Eastern WA. It was a seven hour trip over on Friday and a seven hour trip home today.

Eastern Washington is aware of the virus, but things are more relaxed than here in Western WA. People are washing hands, taking precautions, but there didn't appear to be any panic or stress at all. Of course, dealing with family, these are mostly people who can their own fruits/vegs all the time, and have their own beef (or family that has it).

Wal-Mart in Omak didn't seem to be stripped bare. There were plenty of bottles of H2O2, hand wipes, paper towels & TP. No mass crowds shopping at all.

The traffic was sparce (but Friday might have been because of the storm expected to strike the area). Gas prices are way down (for Eastern WA), near the same price as Western Washington.

Family members who were ill or at high risk didn't attend the funeral, so that was nice. Everyone has been watching the news and paying attention.

Ate at the Casino in Omak (one of the few places there are to eat). There was no other parties in the restaurant. Staff was well aware, and taking precautions with everyone. (Did see one guy in the casino playing video slots with gloves on).

At the hotel, where there is usually a buffet breakfast, they changed to taking orders and bringing your food to you. Everyone at the hotel was very careful with handling money and all.

All in all, I was impressed with how everyone was being careful, but no panic visible.
 

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Left Behind

It's funny what things have been left behind, and what haven't.

Everyone's been concerned with telling us what's been cleaned out, and in the course of it, they've told us what hasn't.

I've been thinking back, every so often, on my successes, and on what I didn't find on my last trips-- Friday night and Saturday morning at grocery stores, and then Saturday night at a convenience store. I kept remembering the funny things that were left behind. I wonder if there's anything to learn from it.

On Twitter, someone noticed that people didn't buy broccoli. Same thing happened at the store I was at! So people really hate it that much???

It's really just sort of odd that people were buying for a big emergency, but at the same time, we're there to buy the things we usually want, despite it.

Plenty of apple cider...

That great produce section still had a lot of fruit salad in the cooler at the front of it. Looked untouched.

I could have got plenty of berries...

Was sort of odd that even though people cleared out all the other onions and tomatoes, big, loose yellow and red onions were unacceptable, as were somewhat unripe beefsteak tomatoes. Seemed like you were helping yourself out a lot by just getting over it and seeing how you could make do.

Also, while heads of lettuce were gone, there was tons of bagged, chopped lettuce.

A lot of frozen coolers were totally vanquished, but frozen cherries caught my eye. Even though I never get them, somehow, before I could walk away, I thought, "I'd better get them," even though I was hurrying. I ended up feeling pretty smart doing that. I guess I'll make smoothies or milkshakes with them.

At that store, there are maybe 30 feet or more of coolers for eggs, coffee creamer, milk, OJ, and other juices. They're near to the toilet paper in the back, so I guess it has to do with the strategy of making people walk through the entire store looking at things before they can get to their staples.

One of the shocking things about that visit to the store was how that big section was almost totally wiped out. I was looking forward to finding my brand of orange juice there, and instead of finding the coolers just greatly reduced, there was nothing.

What was funny was that what they still did have there were a couple of huge piles of a couple selections of eggs. People were kind of calmly stepping up and taking their pick. Normally I'd never grab a carton without checking if any are cracked, but I wasn't even that tempted. I was just happy that they were there.

I turned back towards the paper section, and was a little surprised to see plenty of garbage bags. They stay on my mind because of Selco Begovic. But I always buy the biggest box, and we still have plenty left. I lingered for a second to think it over anyway, and it just made an impression on me.

I guess most people are just on a single-minded shopping trip, and they're kind of overlooking that they might run out of them. I've wondered how many people are going to have to run back out to make "one last trip" again when they notice they forgot something like that.

Still, around the same area of the store, a lot of other things were gone, like all the foil was gone. I guess people have learned that lesson enough in life already.

Then absolutely all of the most essential paper products were gone-- another one that really wowed you. No TP of any kind, paper towels, wet wipes, or tissues. I **** you not.

On the other side of the aisle, though, there were a few useful items for me. One maybe surprising thing was that there were still lots of store brand napkins. I always get them because they give you a great deal. We were about to run out, and I planned to get three, for three weeks. There was no problem getting them.

I wonder if maybe the store just had an easier time keeping its store brand products in stock, because of some kind of supply chain reason. I also noticed there was plenty of store brand cereal still there-- certainly not every variety, though-- and I got a couple more boxes. Maybe people are just repulsed by it. And maybe it's the same deal with the napkins-- maybe they think store brand ones are going to strike them dead.

Decimated chip aisle-- sort of another amazing sight for America. I wrote elsewhere about how I won out by getting small bags of chips from the snack bar on the other side of the store.

The last other funny one I remember was how in the middle of the totally wiped out refrigerated meat section, there was still a lot of gourmet meat. There were also a lot of fancy cold cuts nearby to there.

It's a fancy grocery store, and it's funny how the situation exposed the customers as not really wanting or needing the gourmet stuff.

I guess a lot of people are not aesthetes, even among the many who try to be like or be around classy people.

Or it's also that they really bought into these media cliches of what emergency supplies are-- the words "water, TP, and rice" kind of kept circulating across a news ticker in their heads, and they imagine that they're going to be good troopers eating that stuff meal after meal, day after day, without really thinking it through much.

Then beyond that, they might have decided, "Ok, now maybe I should buy extra regular groceries," but then when they did that, they couldn't be bothered with stuff like figuring out what to do with a big onion, or to put them in bags themselves.

The gourmet meat I bought there was not expensive. If you ever in your years of shopping there have enough curiosity and boldness to just go over there and look once, you can discover that. And because I went over there, I was able to notice one other thing left behind-- plenty enough pork roll. I got three.

I'm not writing this post to try to do a stinging indictment of our society or anything.

But it's just funny how the crisis situation sort of let you have x-ray glasses for seeing what people are really thinking.
 

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Apocaloptimist
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So my teen aged kids where home last week for Spring Break, then COVID-19 panic hysteria ensued. Now they are home this week as well. I read a news article this morning that Texas schools may close for the rest of this school year going to a virtual classroom setting. I was definitely not prepared to spend this much time with 2 teen aged girls. Has there been a run on whiskey yet?
 

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Thing is politics and media have a lot to do with it, but....

People are panic buying all the wrong stuff. Went to a dollar general yesterday the usual was gone TP, hand sanitize, lysol, but what I noticed all the can goods and dry goods were still there.

Sorry but can goods and dry goods are food, you can eat food.
 

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We've been experiencing racism as Asian Americans. We live in a mix community in the SF bay area. I've only experienced racism 1 other time during my entire adult life. That was in the hood by a group of 25+ gang members standing outside of an apt complex while making a delivery.

Today like every other Sunday, 65 y/o mother goes to church then walks next door to the strip mall where is a large Hispanic grocery store. Its very convenient for her. Produce and shelves were cleared and everyone has their shopping carts filled. Lines are long.

My mother only needs a few produce items today. She couldn't find what she needed. Goes in line to pay for some oranges and carrots. Elderly Hispanic man in front of her ask her if she was Chinese. I didn't know about this because I was in the parking lot parking the car and only come in when she is in line so I can pay for the items. She told me about this on the drive home and laughed about it. I did get an uncomfortable feeling while in the line. I have been getting stares/glares while at shops topping off my preps, always by 2 certain minority groups. I've been laughing on the inside because I love seeing the general population in panic while knowing at home, I'm squared away :D: I love apocalyptic films and still watch the Walking Dead. We haven't seen panic buying in California before. We don't get snow storms, hurricanes, floods, etc. Just earthquakes which are overdue and reason for my preps. I've been going to Costco and Walmart just to see the panic and what items people are buying.

But this is the last time I'm allowing her in that store :mad: The virus has been carried over here by business travelers and well to do people on holiday of all races.

We're Vietnamese Americans, been here for over 40 years and we haven't been out of the country in years. We haven't been around anyone who has the virus or has been outside of the country :headshake: Most Asian Americans have been way ahead of the general population in regards to the panic buying. We've been staying up with the news.

I started with extra preps in Jan. I saw reports of people shipping supplies to China from USA. I knew it was a matter of time before supplies gets wiped out. They've done this baby formula in the past. Ever since, I've been topping off my preps, filling in holes and buying stuff to give away. I have been giving away non food supply kits to elderly relatives and neighbors who can't get out or can't find certain items. Also gave a large kit to my niece's classroom.

My 89 y/o American neighbor lives alone and watches CNN all day. She is afraid to even leave the house to drag the garbage can down a few feet to the curb. My elderly aunt is the same way. I gave them both relief boxes which included hand sanitizer, few surgical mask, some N95 mask, disinfectant spray/wipes and Lysol spray. Neighbor was speechless and in disbelief to see the mask and especially the bottle of hand sanitizer :cool:

The next kit is going to the church for the priest. They'll be doing funerals, visiting the sick, etc. When this all boils over and life goes back to normal, people will remember the acts of kindness. Never did I imagine I would be a humanitarian prepper :confused: No one knows the extent of my preps, mums still the word.
I'm white so can't say it's racism but I am getting all kinds of death looks because I have a chronic cough.
 

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The river flows
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I was 5 hours into a drive between Toronto and South Carolina on Friday when I got an email from my office in Toronto saying that one of my colleagues had tested positive for COVID19 and we were all to self isolate. Turned car around, drove home another 5 hours. Got home, went into self isolation, with acceptable preps but missing some top ups and unable to get them. The emotional tension waiting to see if we got sick was thick. Luckily, my neighbours either side are awesome (do cultivate the relationship with your neighbours!!!) and I knew I could get help if needed.

Got called on Saturday afternoon by one of the health authorities to say there had been a mistake and that my colleague did not have COVID19. We were released from quarantine. A phenomenal amount of apologizing by health authority.

Went to supermarket yesterday in the middle class burbs outside Toronto: no flour, no beans, no pasta, no pasta sauces (well, six cans were left), no toilet paper, no paper towel, no fresh chicken, no multivitamins, no zinc, no vitamin C. I'm well stocked, so that's not what I was looking for, I was able to get all my top up items. Topped up my beans at a Whole Foods type store, plenty of beans and flour left there, I do not think the yoga pants hockey mums had found that one yet.

My office is closed for the foreseeable future, but my job is such that I can work from home. I count my blessings I am still employed.

This morning, we have read that restrictions on how many items one can carry out of the store are going into place in some supermarkets (I think max of 2 items of anything out of Food Basics). I expect it will be all of them soon.

God bless, love your family and friends.
 

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This is my first post, but here's my story. There's a personal element and a mainstream element.

Personal Part:

I've been prepping since I got out of the army. I graduated from college, got a stable job, met a really nice girl, and settled down. She's from the suburbs but was working in a really rural area for the last few years. When we decided it was time to move in together, she was kind of frustrated when I insisted on living rural. She misses movie theaters, convenient shopping locations, and stuff to do. She said it would be a huge sacrifice to move out into the sticks, but would do it because she loved me. This was last May.

She would often joke about how it was "kinda weird" that I had so many canned goods, dehydrated meals, and bottles of water. She assumed that, since all I drink is water, it made sense.


Then the virus hit. It was in January.


Mainstream Part:

It started with people ignoring it and joking about it. I remember this was the exact same feeling during Y2K, so I went to the store to top off. Everyone few days, I'd get a text from her. It started with:

They're starting to close offices because of the virus.


The next day at work, everyone was dreading an upcoming (stupid) meeting for like 16 hours straight (not exaggerating) where they were flying a bunch of resident experts. It was pointless, and our bosses thought it was pointless. Our managers are really good guys, so they started email chain about concerns for having this meeting due to the virus. Upper management arrogantly and blindly insisted we "power through it." I tactfully responded, mentioning that we had a message from corporate cancelling all non-essential travel. I also communicated that our guests were coming via air, which is the most dangerous. They postponed the meeting. When I walked into our daily report, by bosses introduced me as the guy that got the stupid meeting cancelled -- and all colleagues were high-fiving me.

I used that opportunity to thank everybody, but communicate that I really felt like this virus was something we should be vigilant of. That night, I get a text from my girlfriend.

They've declared it an official pandemic.

I came home late from work that night and, as much as I wanted to go to sleep, I had the discipline to go out to the store. I already have a decent amount of supplies, but I had seen interviews with CDC reps claiming this is probably going to be a 3 to 6 month thing (I had about 2 months of supplies at this point, maybe 4 if we rationed everything). She got home right as I was getting ready to leave, we hopped in the car, and we grabbed some supplies. The stores were fine. There was still plenty of food and water, so we did just fine. We got home at midnight

The following day, we woke up to see the DOW dropped to the lowest it had been in three decades.


A few days later, a few of the guys talked to the boss about working from home. The boss is generally a great guy, who gives a sincere announcement about "temporarily" letting folks work from home until this "clears up." I love the dude, but I'm thinking he (like many) are assuming the danger is "exaggerated."

Then the guys at work start making fun of those of us who want to work from home. "Oh, the germaphobes are "working" from home! Haha!" Like clockwork, I got more texts from the girlfriend:

They're closing schools. Universities are doing classes online and kids are expected to stay home.

Every day after work, I'd make a point to stop at the store. Not "panic buying," but just making sure our supplies are adequate to minimize our trips out during the outbreak. This usually amounts to a few bags of beans, maybe a large bag of rice if I see one, and things that I usually make lots of trips for (fresh fruit, toothpaste, deodorant, etc).

By March, I went to Wal Mart, and there was no water, toilet paper, or paper towels. At this point, I basically knew what to expect.

I had some time after work that day to run by the nice, bourgeoisie store where I normally shop. People were losing it. The store was jam packed, and people were freaking out. No less than 3 times I heard 3 different little kids ask out loud "Mommy, what's going on? What's wrong with everybody?" It really broke my heart because I knew most of these suburban parents spent thousands of dollars on iGadgets, internet porn, and other stupid toys but probably didn't have even a week's worth of bottled water in their house. I went to check out, and the cashier yelled at me:


Her:You can't buy that much water!
Me: (calmly) I can't buy water?
Her: (panicking) People are "panic buying!" People are acting like it's Armageddon!
Me: 5 gallons of water is panic buying? It's 75 degrees outside. That's less than a week's worth of water.
Her: The government is making us ration our supplies. You can't buy that much.
Me: Well how much am I allowed to buy? A sign near the water would have been helpful.

At this point, the people behind me are ****ed -- but surprisingly not at me. The girl behind me says "That's stupid! I'll buy whatever water he's not allowed to have." I hear another guy behind me call out "What the f*ck do you mean can't buy water? The kid's doesn't even got a big cart!

Well she scans it and, miraculously, I was allowed to buy it. I thanked the lady behind me and got ready to leave. This said, that cashier did not handle that situation well, because a bunch of people just busted out of line straight for the water and started grabbing as much as they could. I walked out of the store and, by the time I was putting my cart back, I saw a fist fight in the parking lot over what looked like toilet paper. That's when I realized stuff was just starting to get real.

What I took away from this

For years, I've been telling people that you might not be able to go to the store to get the things you need. Consequently, for years, people almost always responded by calling me a "survivalist" or a "nut job." I tried to reason with people about how FEMA dictates you should have at least 2 weeks of supplies per person per household at any given time -- it didn't matter. People just thought I was screwy. I could even detect that my girlfriend (who loves me and supports me) would sometimes think it's silly that I had more than 14 bottles of water at the house at any given time.

The reality is that you can't reason with people because they don't want to believe it. Basically "survival" for most people means driving to the store and buying an extra cube of diet Pepsi. By the time Joe Sixpack puts down his damn smartphone and realizes that he's going to have to change their behavior to have the things he needs, it's already too late because every other Joe Sixpack is just getting started preparing at the same time. If everybody tries to get 3 - 6 months of supplies all at once, you can freaking forget it.


Yesterday, my girlfriend came to me and told me how fortunate she felt that we had supplies. I explained to her very seriously that she can't go telling people we have them. No friends, no social media, nothing. Her parents can know and my mom can know (since both are immunocompromised and might need help), but that's it.


Long story short, things are getting worse. I see social media is now bombarded by unprepared suburban types who are blaming everybody else that they aren't prepared. I'm not an active poster, but it's not at all surprising to me that their inability to feed their family falls on everyone else.

Today, I woke up to news of multiple store lootings. All involved shootings. If they'd do it to a store downtown where there's cameras, they'll definitely do it to a private residence.


I'm hoping this will be a learning moment for everybody.
 
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