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What crops do you feel do well in hot weather? These are garden plants that will produce through the brutal summer months.


I have had good luck with:

  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Okra
  • Zucchini

Okra thrives in hot weather. It seems the hotter the weather, the more the okra produces.

The only problem I have ran into with Jalapeno peppers is keeping enough water on them through the summer months.
 

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Wrong Side of Heaven
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The above list and my globe artichokes did great if watered well. They were really early season so it may have had more to do with the mild winters and them breaking ground in Nov.

Cherry tomatoes, one plant would give more than I could use and it keeps going until a hard frost.
 

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Emperor has no clothes
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Amaranth - highly nutritious grains, leaves, and shoots; no to low maintenance & adaptable; self-seeds

Cowpea - highly nutritious; versatile - entire plant edible; fresh pods good lacto-fermented pickles, dry beans good pantry staples; no to low maintenance; one of three crops considered by NASA for closed ecological life-support systems
 

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MyPrepperLife
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I love my Oregon Spring tomatoes! I had a bumper crop last year. I still have some jars of tomatoes I canned last Sept-Oct. I use them in lots of different ways for cooking. For example, last night I used a jar of them to make scrumptious pasta sauce.

This year I plan to try dehydrating tomatoes in addition to canning them.
 

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We get hot enough that jalapenos stop producing in summer. Our best crops are spring and fall for those.

There are a few varieties of tomatoes that produce through the heat, or at least can survive our extreme heat to start producing again in fall. Juliet just died, lasted 3 years. Punta Banda has worked well for me, too, when I can get it established.

Rosemary has been great. Once established it's drought tolerant, and the heat doesn't kill it. I can water it about once a month and it's good. We've gotten 3 1/2" of rain in the last 14 months.

My comfrey is still holding on with lots of supplemental water. I just planted it in October, though, so it's not established yet.

Tepary beans love the heat, but you still need water to start them. I've also planted a few local melons and had success. I've yet to get any squash, been planting it for 4 years now. Lots of male flowers but few to no female flowers. When I do get a female flower (last year I got two of them), it also coincided with no male flowers.
 

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Not sure if this applies but my peppermint and spearmint have propagated in several places & even in the heat waves & big storms are still going strong. Also the chives but the sun is getting to them a bit.
 

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We do well with summer squash, okra, tomatoes and egg plant. Our summers are hot and dry. I find weeds do very well when it is hot.
Just curious about the tomatoes; haven’t been able to plant this year, but the last even just above average hot season we had, they started splitting while still small - they were beefsteak & cant remember the other kind. Is there a trick/tip to prevent this (other than too much sun)?

ETA: lol about the flipping weeds—too right!
 

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Just curious about the tomatoes; haven’t been able to plant this year, but the last even just above average hot season we had, they started splitting while still small - they were beefsteak & cant remember the other kind. Is there a trick/tip to prevent this (other than too much sun)?

ETA: lol about the flipping weeds—too right!
I don't raise beefsteak so may not be of much help. I find tomatoes split or have end rot when there is a shortage of of iron in the soil. Try adding some iron. I think I bought chelated iron. Anyway it was iron which was soluble and worked great. I stopped beefsteak tomatoes as I didn't like the shape nor the core.
 

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Emperor has no clothes
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Just curious about the tomatoes; haven’t been able to plant this year, but the last even just above average hot season we had, they started splitting while still small - they were beefsteak & cant remember the other kind. Is there a trick/tip to prevent this (other than too much sun)?

ETA: lol about the flipping weeds—too right!
Tomatoes cracking is often indication of an inconsistent access to adequate amounts of water. Try to ensure a regular pattern in water supply though this is challenging at times given Mother Nature's fickleness. Mulching might help...
 

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I don't raise beefsteak so may not be of much help. I find tomatoes split or have end rot when there is a shortage of of iron in the soil. Try adding some iron. I think I bought chelated iron. Anyway it was iron which was soluble and worked great. I stopped beefsteak tomatoes as I didn't like the shape nor the core.
Much thanks to Goatdaddy & Pond Edge. I do make sure about consistent water, but I have really rocky soil & I know it’s not premium for many nutrients, so I usually just added a bunch of compost from a friends barn & worked it into the area; looks like my “bunch” wasn’t enough.

The iron (very likely needed) & spreading more mulch are good tips. Will try next season. Thanks!
 

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We have a sizable creek in an erosion valley, so our land is a humid heat sink in the summer. We grow a salsa garden of meaty variety tomatoes, salsa and banana peppers, onions. All do well in the heat here. We also do beds of combined squash, collards and hot peppers. I also do a bed of sweet potatoes with okra and sweet bell peppers, as both need not much water but the bells do better with cool damp feet. All of these beds do well in heat. We do other vegies for the early Spring and Fall. We're building grape arbors along fences and sunny sides of the outbuildings. They love heat. We water can grape juices.
 

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Our mulch is companion planted sqaush, bushbeans and sweet potato leaves. They all get chopped up in place in October and covered with leaves, then chickin poop dirt. The closest we ever come to tilling is a garden fork in the early Spring or a shovel for potato starts. Its low cost and little effort or weeding. I like gardening but have little time for it. We even have grass lanes between the rows so a quick pass with a push mower is all thats needed.
 

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<--My Faverolle Chicken
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Sweet potatoes, KY pole beans, Jalapeno, Okra, pumpkins/squash (if you can keep the SVB off of them).
 

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When we lived in Florida, nothing survived in the garden by end of July, all dead.

Here in Virginia things grow really well in the summer: green beans, squash, pumpkins , greens, peppers, tomatoes
it has gotten too hot for my spinach and lettuce and they bolted

now if I could just kill all those damned Japanese bettles...grrrrrr, they are eating my greens

what exactly do rabbits eat in a garden? We have lots of them, but I never see them eat anything, nor do I see damage? Weird. We leave them alone to feed the coyotes and other varmints ( less chance of them coming after our goat kids and chickens)
 
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