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NRA Life 1971
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I'm not much of a baker. I found a pound of unopened yeast in the freezer that is 4 plus years old.
Any hope of using it?
 

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Probably. May not raise as well as normal, but give it a try. It's not like you would lose a lot of money in bread ingrediants if it doesn't work. If it does work replace it and use it up now rather than letting it sit around.

ETA: Just asked my wife and she told me that she has used it at that age, but added an extra teaspoon to it and had no problems.
 

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Try it. I once found 6 packets of yeast that was several years old that was stored in a cupboard. The first one I tried worked just fine. The next 2 didn't work at all and I tossed the rest. The only way you will know is to try it.
 

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Forward, into the fray!
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Kept in the freezer it's at the end of its keepability (yeah, yeah, I've invented a new word lol). Still likely at least half good. Use 1 and a half the called for amount and it'll probably be just fine, just use it up this year.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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You can "proof it" to avoid losing a whole recipe/batch. Put a bit in a bowl with a little bit of flour, a pinch of sugar and warm water. Keep it in a warm place, around 70'F to 80'F (under an incandescent light bulb or even your range hood lights works) and come back in a half hour. If it's bubbling, the yeast still has some life left in it.

I'd do what others recommend, though: add a little bit more to the recipe for good measure.

Another potential use: You could use it to make sour dough starter. The original yeast plus microbes in the air plus time could give you that little extra push that old yeast needs- it will start growing its own.
(I know, I know, sour dough purists will point out that authentic starter uses bacillus, not yeast- I'm all about the bread rising by whatever means!)

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/8392/sourdough-starter/
 

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The longterm old timey replacement for yeast is sourdough. I wonder if you could keep modern bread yeast strains going by using the same techniques as used to keep sourdough???
 

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When you proof yeast, use an instant read thermometer. Best results are with 110 to 114 degree water. That is warm enough to get it going, but not hot enough to kill it.
 

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At times my wife gets on a roll where she makes a cake called Amish friendship bread. It starts with making sourdough with yeast caught from thin air. She keeps the sourdough going for a period of time depending on how domestic she is feeling. Everybody in the family loves it, it is more like chocolate cake than bread.

It takes some maintenance if you aren't using it often, the yeast needs to be fed in a continuing basis. The recipie is probably on the internet.
 

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In Memory
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I have some bottles of yeast that I got from wal mart back in 2010 that has been in a freezer at -10 degrees F and it still worked last time I made bread.
 
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