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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you are in the woods in the winter and need to build a fire, would you use these branches and vines as kindling?

ivy_berry.jpg



I hope for your sake, that you answered no. They are poison ivy branches and vines. Even without the leaves, you can still get poison ivy from the wood and bark. The give-away to identify this in the winter is the amount of hair on the branches and vines.

If you burn this and inhale the smoke, you will get a nice poison ivy rash in your lungs that would be miserable at best. Worst case--death from an allergic reaction or pulmonary edema (swelling and fluid in the lungs).

Learn before you burn.
 

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Good reason to keep a bar of Fels Naptha with you.




"Fels-Naptha is also used as a home remedy in the treatment of contact dermatitis caused by exposure to poison ivy, poison oak, and other oil-transmitted organic skin-irritants. Washing the skin directly with the soap helps break up the oils that carry the toxin."


They used to require us to have a bar with us on ALL camping trips as a Boy Scout. I have a bar in each bag I have. Also works as a laundry detergent.
 

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there is poison ivy all around where i live, so i have learned to identify it.

Also, vines seem to make terrible firewood, even if dead and dry. Anywhere vines grow there will be better available.
 

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All the poison ivy around here is of the ground dwelling variety, never seen a creeping vine. And, despite the fact that it's all over the place here, I've never had an allergic reaction, though I must have come in contact at least a few times.
I never gather random twigs for fire, always just choose a standing dead wood tree and harvest the whole thing, twigs, branches, bark, lumber.
 

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Good reason to keep a bar of Fels Naptha with you.




"Fels-Naptha is also used as a home remedy in the treatment of contact dermatitis caused by exposure to poison ivy, poison oak, and other oil-transmitted organic skin-irritants. Washing the skin directly with the soap helps break up the oils that carry the toxin."


They used to require us to have a bar with us on ALL camping trips as a Boy Scout. I have a bar in each bag I have. Also works as a laundry detergent.
Were do you get some of that!!!!
 

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Years ago I was very poison Ivy tolerant, I seldom got any bumps... Then I used my chainsaw to cut down an apple tree that was being strangled by the poison ivy vines. I had ivy chips all over my forearms. I have never been in such agony as I was the following week. Ever since I get the rash just by looking at the stuff.

Allan
 

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Years ago I was very poison Ivy tolerant, I seldom got any bumps... Then I used my chainsaw to cut down an apple tree that was being strangled by the poison ivy vines. I had ivy chips all over my forearms. I have never been in such agony as I was the following week. Ever since I get the rash just by looking at the stuff.

Allan
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I have handled it in the past, and nothing happened to me. When I was young, we had some growing on the fence in the back yard. My sister broke out like crazy, but despite pulling it out of the fence and chasing her with it, nothing ever happened to me.

This is really weird, because I am prone to rashes. I often get them just because the humidity drops too low, or because I have worked out for 3 hours, and the sweat under my arms and behind my knees causes rashes. This would happen when working in hot sweaty shops as well.
 

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They are poison ivy branches and vines. Even without the leaves, you can still get poison ivy from the wood and bark. The give-away to identify this in the winter is the amount of hair on the branches and vines.

If you burn this and inhale the smoke, you will get a nice poison ivy rash in your lungs that would be miserable at best. Worst case--death from an allergic reaction or pulmonary edema (swelling and fluid in the lungs).

Learn before you burn.
I once had poison ivy in the winter when helping a neighbor clear a field. My doctor was on vacation and so I went to a different doctor. he told me that a person can't get poison ivy in the winter because the only way a person can get poison ivy is by direct contact of the leaf.

I told him I was a RN that had worked in the country for my whole careers and that a person can TOO get poison ivy without having direct contact from a leaf. My worse case to that date had been by petting my dog that had run through a batch of the stuff. I told him that I had an uncle that almost died from inhaling the smoke from poison ivy because it closed off his airway.

The doctor said it couldn't happen and he would not treat me for my "dry skin rash" as he called it. Two days later I went to the ER just so I could get looked at. The doctor there told me to not let my poison ivy get so out of hand. He told me I should have gone to see a doctor right away before it had spread.

It's so nice to talk with two different professionals with two different views.:rolleyes: Anyway, I went to get my predisone prescription filled and the pharmacist told me I couldn't have poison ivy because a person could only get the rash by coming in direct contact with the leaf. Really, what medical book are they teaching these boys with? :eek:

Nice thing is that for some reason since that winter I've never had poison ivy again. Maybe the oil just hasn't been potent enough since then. Some years it is stronger than others. So if a doctor tells you you can't get poison ivy except by direct contact with the leaf, ask to see another doctor. Some have a very closed mind. I keep wondering if these doctors forgot to let the poison ivy read the books that they did.:D:

BLT
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Medicine is not an exact science. That is why its called "practicing medicine."

BTW--you should have gotten some of the poison ivy branches or roots and challenged the quack and pill dispenser to rub some on themselves.

You can brush up against it without getting the rash. It is when you break the leave/stems/roots and get exposed to the oils that you get the rash.
 

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Medicine is not an exact science. That is why its called "practicing medicine."

BTW--you should have gotten some of the poison ivy branches or roots and challenged the quack and pill dispenser to rub some on themselves.

You can brush up against it without getting the rash. It is when you break the leave/stems/roots and get exposed to the oils that you get the rash.
My doctore always says to do that. Ask them to prove themselves correct by rubbing it on themselves. The only problem with that is that some people don't react to poison ivy.:)

Urushiol is is present on the outside of the plant during dry periods. It is a protection for the plant to not lose too much water in a drought. So you can get a rash from just brushing against the plant if it is during a dry spell.

I won't argue with anyone but I won't go touching the stuff just to see if I can or can't get it by just touching it.:)

BLT
 

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Medicine is not an exact science. That is why its called "practicing medicine."

BTW--you should have gotten some of the poison ivy branches or roots and challenged the quack and pill dispenser to rub some on themselves.

You can brush up against it without getting the rash. It is when you break the leave/stems/roots and get exposed to the oils that you get the rash.


My son is highly allergic to poison ivy.

I make sure there is none anywhere near our yard every year so he can go outside.

He cant have the window down in the car in the summer because people mowing their yards throws this stuff into the air and it gets on him and he gets sick from it. I'm talking emergency room sick too.

Two years ago he got a tiny amount on his left ear lobe and within 45 minutes it had swelled up to the size of a large grapefruit and had busted open and was draining.

He doesnt have to come in contact to get a rash. I know for a fact it is in the air here and he can get it from just sitting on the couch watching TV if there is a breeze and the door is open.
 

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If you are in the woods in the winter and need to build a fire, would you use these branches and vines as kindling?

View attachment 9933



I hope for your sake, that you answered no. They are poison ivy branches and vines. Even without the leaves, you can still get poison ivy from the wood and bark. The give-away to identify this in the winter is the amount of hair on the branches and vines.

If you burn this and inhale the smoke, you will get a nice poison ivy rash in your lungs that would be miserable at best. Worst case--death from an allergic reaction or pulmonary edema (swelling and fluid in the lungs).

Learn before you burn.
Thank you for posting that, I was going to say yes I would burn it. I have never had poison ivy or oak so I have no clue what they look like, everyone I have ever asked have shown me different stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Try the link below. It has some great photos of poison ivy throught the year.

http://www.poison-ivy.org

Key thing to look for when leaves are out:

Leaves--group of three leave at the end of the stalk. Semi-shiny. oval or semi-oak shaped leaves.
White, clear or green berries behind the group of leaves.
In the fall, the leave turn a reddish-rust color.

Poison Ivy can creep, climb or be like a bush.
 

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I'm Allergic to poison Ivy and oak. It is some bad stuff. When I'm cutting Firewood and find a vine on it I treat it like nuclear waste. And wash my hands with dish washing liquid real good when I get home.
 
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