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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Folks.

I am a Vermiculturalist, which is a fancy name for a person who raises worms for a certain purpose. Since I have a good size garden and few fruit trees, I have plenty of veggie matter to feed my worms.The great thing about this is the soil you get back after the worms are done with it is added to regular soil like fertilizer. The worms break down the rotting cuttings, weeds, fruit and newsprint into something the plants can absorb easily. This is healthier than the chemicals you can get for your gardens, since there is no chance for "burning" the plants or killing the soil bacteria that a good garden needs.

I woud like to send you a link to my website about worms, but since I am new here and I do not know the rules for links yet, I will wait till I learn more about how this site works before I make mistake. I am open to questions about worms so feel free to ask. Ask about "Worm tea".
 

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I am an amateur worm dirt farmer myself... I plant raised bed gardens and the worm dirt is the best.

I do have trouble keeping my worms alive now and again. We have heavy heavy clays and often very hot and very dry summers.

So, I'll order vermipods or live worms occasionally to replenish or start again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
worm bins

Have you tried to keep an indoor worm bin to put your kitchen scraps into? That will give you a ready supply of new worms each year. One year we had a bad freeze that lasted along time and it killed almost all of my worms outdoors. I was lucky to have the indoor worms to get the new pile going quickly. I hope that helps.
 

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Have you tried to keep an indoor worm bin to put your kitchen scraps into? That will give you a ready supply of new worms each year. One year we had a bad freeze that lasted along time and it killed almost all of my worms outdoors. I was lucky to have the indoor worms to get the new pile going quickly. I hope that helps.
No, we don't really keep vegetable scraps in the house. We just throw them into the compost heap outside and let nature work. But, when it gets over a 100 degrees Fahrenheit and has only rained 4-5" so far this year, we may have another worm kill.

I suppose we probably should keep a small kitchen composter around. I have seen the stackable kits with worms included for a mere $100 ... I also found this cool website that tells how to make a stack worm tray kit and kitchen composter. :D:
 

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there is a post made by myself in this forum that has some very cheap alternatives to buying composters..There truly is no need to spend money and a fair bit of it for something so simple as turning garbage into soil unless of course you are just into the expensive toy thing..
My thoughts exactly, I have seen those kits, some are nothing more that baskets with holes drilled into them anyway. (And that is the beauty of it, you can do it yourself.)

I'm probably going to go the 5 gallon bucket route for table scraps to keep some worms indoors so I don't loose them all due to the high temp and lack of rain. (We are already in drought stage 1.)

Here is your post... about composting.
 

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i'm planning to build a worm bin for some red worms. thinking of raising them as feed for fish. however i am sorely tempted to just dump my organic waste on the ground and feed and raise them there. any suggestions?
 
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