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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I'd create a thread where we can discuss various unintended consequences of suddenly being forced to live on more manual labor. It's easy to say that people will just have to hike up their skirts, but in reality, blistered feet and lowered immune systems will be serious obstacles.

What kind of training best prepares the body for hours of walking or fireside cooking?

What unexpected threats will be more pressing in a dirty and chaotic situation?

What are the best ways to soothe aching muscles, minimize fatigue, or keep mental sharpness?

Should a person develop trauma-related symptoms, which ones can be treated at home?

Post your thoughts. I'll be back around to give some insight as well.
 

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What kind of training best prepares the body for hours of walking or fireside cooking?
Go out every day and walk for several hours. Go camping and cook over a wood fire.
What unexpected threats will be more pressing in a dirty and chaotic situation?
Cuts, burns, blisters, sprains and broken bones
What are the best ways to soothe aching muscles, minimize fatigue, or keep mental sharpness?
Soaking in water for muscles and comfort things like a shot of whiskey. To minimize fatigue be in good shape and pace yourself (something when I was young I was terrible at since I would work until I dropped). Mental sharpness requires problem solving on a routine basis.
Should a person develop trauma-related symptoms, which ones can be treated at home?
Standard ones that do not require the knowledge of a trained medical practitioner and prescription drugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Those are all good points, and things the average person should anticipate. The human body also comes with a whole bunch of "easter eggs" we don't find until they appear.

Some examples:

Whiplash or severe neck pain can cause vertigo. If left untreated, vertigo can progress into vomiting and disorientation.

Low blood sugar can cause fainting.

Falling arches can cause severe throbbing pain.

Bleeding hangnails are a serious infection risk.
 

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I thought I'd create a thread where we can discuss various unintended consequences of suddenly being forced to live on more manual labor. It's easy to say that people will just have to hike up their skirts, but in reality, blistered feet and lowered immune systems will be serious obstacles.

What kind of training best prepares the body for hours of walking or fireside cooking?


What are the best ways to soothe aching muscles, minimize fatigue, or keep mental sharpness?
Should the SHTF it will be the best diet and exercise plan a lot of people can ever use. People will be sore and tired at first but those who survive will shed unwanted pounds and use parts of their body that they don't currently use. Kind of like sending a kid off to fat camp or the overweight pot head who'd old man threatens to kick him out if he doesn't join the army. I'm more worried about those people who are dependent on anti depressants, pain killers, insulin and blood pressure meds. In a lot of cases there will be no helping them.
 

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What kind of training best prepares the body for hours of walking or fireside cooking?
MMA will adequately prepare every part of the body for serious manual labor except maybe the fingers. While sore tired fingers won't kill you, try working on a car in freezing temperatures after your fingers have hit their fatigue point. Finger calluses and strength really only come from using them hard.
 

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In our modern lifestyles we burn the candle at both ends and take less sleep than we need. If we have to adjust to a life that includes alot of manual labor and hazardous jobs, I think it will be very important to get a full night's sleep. Accidents happen when people are sleep deprived.
 
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