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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can we talk about wool soakers a little?
I have a feeling that the act involved in making babies will be a popular activity when the lights go out forever. Babies are being abandoned now I do not think that it is less likely to happen post SHTF. Even if you do not ever plan on having a baby in your life it is going to be what you did not plan on that is going to trip you up in the PAW.

If you did not stock something to cover a baby’s you will have to improvise something. Since every prepper needs to know how to sew it would seem that making soakers are the option.

Plastic/vinyl can no longer be found for babies in stores. All of the Plastic/vinyl pants that I have found in stores are made to fit children old enough to be potty trained.

Patterns for making them.
Materials for making them.
Does wool have to be used?
Care and feeding of them.
How to use them
Their value now and in the PAW.
How many are need for each baby.
How well do they work?
 

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Paw is what Mark called his dad.

I'm old.

:rolleyes:
I LOVE that show...they rerun it on MeTv and I found that episodes from when I was young are like new all this time later. I also found there were some I either never saw or didn't remember.
 

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If I recall correctly

PAW means "Post Apocalypse World"

A wool soaker is essentially a knitted diaper cover; goes on over top the diaper you put on the baby. Wool sucks up moisture, and in this application helps wick moisture away from the baby's bottom. Wool is WAY more absorbent, and moisture retaining, than cotton and such so it helps the baby not feel wet. Especially useful when pre-potty trained kids are trying to sleep through the night.
 

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Can we talk about wool soakers a little?
I have a feeling that the act involved in making babies will be a popular activity when the lights go out forever. Babies are being abandoned now I do not think that it is less likely to happen post SHTF. Even if you do not ever plan on having a baby in your life it is going to be what you did not plan on that is going to trip you up in the PAW.

If you did not stock something to cover a baby’s you will have to improvise something. Since every prepper needs to know how to sew it would seem that making soakers are the option.

Plastic/vinyl can no longer be found for babies in stores. All of the Plastic/vinyl pants that I have found in stores are made to fit children old enough to be potty trained.

Patterns for making them.
Materials for making them.
Does wool have to be used?
Care and feeding of them.
How to use them
Their value now and in the PAW.
How many are need for each baby.
How well do they work?
Wool felt is indeed the best version of an over pant, because they breathe. It's a very old system: I was positively archaic when I used them in the nineties.

They smell when someone's done a pooh more (nothing wrong with that, mummy changes it sooner) but the child himself is not so damp and uncomfortable as he is in a plastic overpant.

With a young baby you have a square of wool felt about 1 yard. Crochet the edges in a blanket stitch to stop any fraying. As a newborn you swaddle him with his legs inside it, doing a half-kite shape, with a nappy used to line it, to control the meconium pooh. A little older, you fold it in half triangle-ways, and then pin to baby over nappy.

As the baby gets bigger, you make that triangle closer and closer to the kite shape but still are obliged to do the triangle pinning technique of 1 pin in the centre of everything.

As the baby gets older, and the felt gets washed (carefully by hand) it will shrink slowly. This is your friend and your enemy. Your friend because the felt is thicker and more effective; enemy because it's getting smaller.

At some point you could easily sew up an overnap out of this felted wool, if you can sew.
 

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If I recal correctly

PAS means "Post Apocalypse World"

A wool soaker is essentially a knitted diaper cover; goes on over top the diaper you put on the baby. Wool sucks up moisture, and in this application helps wick moisture away from the baby's bottom. Wool is WAY more absorbent, and moisture retaining, than cotton and such so it helps the baby not feel wet. Especially useful when pre-potty trained kids are trying to sleep through the night.
OIC. No. I wouldn't use that at all. Not unless I knitted it on huge needles and felted it down. I used wool flannel however, and that was fine.

Wool is not absorbent whatsoever, which is what's good about it. Well: the outer shell is not absorbent, the inner wool is; but it's not very absorbent. it's exothermic when wet however, and cotton is endothermic so the woolen overnap keeps the child warm.

I think you do have problems if they're getting up to 3 yrs old and still in nappies overnight, because they have too much wees for one nappy. You can put an extra one in there for padding, but it is not absorbent fast enough, and you will have puddles. I haven't found a result that is better than bought nappies for older children overnighting.
 

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Can I use wool sweaters to make them? I bought some on half price day at the goodwill. Do they have to be 100% wool?
It's hard to say. If you don't have access to wool, then maybe polar fleece - but I don't know how exothermic that'll be. As to acrylic sweaters or so: they won't felt for you.

I can't give any advice other than to say what I did, which was wool flannel. In a PAW that's okay because it's about the easiest thing to make; in this world now I'd make liners that have a plastic layer, just because their little dumfosticators get so damp otherwise.
 

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Wool is HIGHLY absorbent, it just does so without feeling wet or significantly altering its insulative capacity.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bm0255692?journalCode=bomaf6

http://www.denverfabrics.com/Pages/wool/wool-fabrics.aspx

Wool used to be used in everything from bandages to tampons.


I looked up how wool soakers work after it was said I was wrong, as well as the knitting of them being said not being a good idea.

Uhm, I was correct in my recollection (which I was pretty sure of since the last 4 generations I have knowledge of used them in my family).

One, knitted soakers are extremely common and have been for AGES. Google them and almost all the images are knitted or crocheted ones.

For more on that, and that they wick moisture, and pretty much everything I thought they did and more (I did not know a LOT about what they did) check these (or Google for yourself) :

http://www.pootersdiapers.com/wool-soakers/

http://home.howstuffworks.com/green-living/organic-wool-diaper-covers.htm

https://littlespruce.wordpress.com/category/wool-cloth-diaper-covers/


Knitted and crocheted are at least as common as sewn, if not more so.
 

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I gotta ask this; some people itch like crazy when the skin is directly against wool. Doesn't the wool "itch" a lot of children? Seems like that could lead to many sleepless nights for some parents?
 

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The idea is that the wool soaker goes on OVER the cloth diaper, so the cloth diaper is still against the skin.

Also, the type of wool you use has a HUGE part in how itchy it is. Merino wool, and merino blends (for example) are VERY non-itchy. IMHO you would have to be extremely sensitive to wool in order to find that variety itchy at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I paid $2.30 each for the sweaters so I thought I would try to make something out of them.

One is brown and says 100% lambs’ wool.
One is red and says 100% wool made in Australia.
One is blue and says 100% cashmere.
The last on is black and gray strips and the tag says 46% cotton, 21% rayon, 20% nylon, 7% wool and 6% angora rabbit hair.

The top two I was going to try to make soakers out of and the bottom two socks or something else out of them. The cashmere one might make a good soaker also but I do not know if it is thick enough.
 
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