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Ok. Let's forget about building codes for a minute. For a house not equiped with a wood burning stove, (gas fireplace looks nice thought) I was contemplating a temporary hook up for a wood burning stove with the exhaust pipe out the window, set up on bricks and surrounded by rigid foil faced insulation. The use would be for heating or cooking. I wanted the stove anyway but could better justify the expense if it might have a second purpose. I guess pipe would go a few feet over the roof. Any thoughts?

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t.../search-box.jsp.form23&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1
 

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That has worked in the past and will still work with proper precautions. The flue/stove pipe needs sheet metal screws at the joints to be secure.I had a wood burner in a farm house I ran the pipe across the room about 18 inches below the ceiling(very high ceiling)to the top window on the opposite side( used a fan on the pipe for extra heat) .I took out the window glass and put tin in its place .I used insulated pipe past the elbow joint to go up past the roof,it had a tin roof but I still went up about 2 feet past the eve of the roof. Good Luck !!
 

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I have used a wood heater like that. they work ok like that but they tend to clog up with crisote and have to be cleaned out pretty regular. Also you will get about one season out of the outside elbow and pipe.
 

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Cheap wood stoves near you

Years ago I lived in rural Western Washington. A hippie down the road had a Korean War MASH style tent with pallets on the floor and a very very large Mail Box for a wood stove. One of the neighbors down our rural road unwillingly donated their Mail Box for his wood stove. This tent was used for 2 years for full time use. Cheap, effective, and portable shelter!
 

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I live in an house built in 1870. The rooms are 10 ft high. Because of the age of my chimneys, and lack of funds, I was thinking of getting one of these and piping it out a window also.
Glad to know it can be done.
 

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Thanks for posting.

This is an area of concern for me, as we have no fireplace and only a central natural gas unit.

Plenty of salvageables in our neighborhood of mostly abandoned or dilapidated structures. It would break my heart to burn the oak flooring from some of these buildings, but it IS a ready source in times of need.

Are there any extra precautions to take considering my home also has these beautiful, 50 year-old oak floors? I'd imagine it's seasoned real good by now and poses a hazard. Would refinishing help? Or maybe a hefty cinder or brick surround?
 

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My sister-in-law and her husband have the chimney for thier corn burner set up like that. The panel in the window is a combiation of tin and plywood. The tin is around the pipe and is about 1 foot square. Plywood makes up the rest.
 

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I am a volunteer firefighter and last year went to a house fire that started because the stove pipe went out the window. Food for thought
 

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Please do not use "rigid foil covered insulated foam" ANYWHERE near a stove pipe! Most all of these products when burning, melting or overly heated emit toxic gases.

I clicked on the Cabela's link and that is a campstove, not a woodstove capable of sustaining the heat requirement of anything but the room where it is located and it's not rated for indoor use for a reason.

Now as to the pipe out the window... I did this many years ago for a winter and it was a really bad idea as I had used only single-wall pipe from a woodstove through a large sheet metal collar mounted in plywood at a window.

The pipe protruded a couple feet out of the house and I installed an elbow and then extended the pipe a few feet higher than the eave (supported with tie wire to overhang on each side).

Single wall pipe on the exterior will not get warm enough to provide good draft so "smoke back" is common; you could die in your sleep from carbon monoxide/dioxide or smoke inhalation.

Secondly the creosote build-up is very fast on cold un-insulated pipe so a chimney fire is inevitable; MY CHIMNEY FIRE SOUNDED LIKE A FREIGHT TRAIN it was roaring so loud and my single wall pipe turned cherry red... Had I not woke up and immediately closed the damper we would have been killed. BTW.. after the pipe cooled it turned to dust in many places; had this happened with flames in it the house woould have burned to the ground.

Whatever you do NEVER open the stove door during a chimney fire to try to douse the flames as you'll only feed more oxygen to the fire! SHUT OFF THE AIR INTAKE & DAMPER!

My advice (while you have the time) is to install a real woodstove and real metalbestos chimney either through the ceiling or through the wall.

We heat with two woodstoves running 24/7 and the house has 21 rooms; not as comfortable as running the radiant flooring with propane but a whole lot cheaper and I'm in charge of the fuel availablity, not OPEC, the government or a delivery truck.

We also have two pellet stoves in the event we will be away for the day and unable to throw wood on the fire but at $300 per ton we try not to use them except during the "shoulder seasons" when we just want to take the chill off in the morning.
 

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I live in an house built in 1870. The rooms are 10 ft high. Because of the age of my chimneys, and lack of funds, I was thinking of getting one of these and piping it out a window also.
Glad to know it can be done.
You can have a metal insert put into your fireplace with a metal exhaust pipe running inside your chimney and out the roof, instead of replacing your chimney liner.
 
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