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WB

Did you have to build a chimney for it ? I have a fireplace on the first floor but want to install the wood burner in the basement. Building a chimney is a pain in the back side because of regs and such.
That's not the only problem with a chimney. Years ago my Dad had a word burning stove installed & the chimney professionally built.
He was out & about one night & came home to a smouldering pile of rubble because the chimney had caught on fire & burned the place to the ground.
 

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It's not a pain to build a chimney any more. Install the stainless chimney sections as per the manufacturer's specs and the same for the stove. Then you may/may not need to have your insurance come out and inspect it.

I have heard of gas furnaces blowing the house off the foundation and oil furnaces leaking many many gallons of oil so there all with there own issues. But wood is the only one that works seamlessly with no power.
 

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It’s not bad putting up a chimney really , just stack the pipes and twist them and they lock .
I add a couple ofSS screws on each pipe. I’ve had people twist the pipe cleaning it and they come apart .
Even Building one out of chimney lock/ flue is easy it’s just stacking blocks with clay flue on the inside . You just need to be able to lift the blocks .
 

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Even way back when we knew wood heat would be important to us so we had a center chimney fireplace put it when we were building.
The center flue was for the upstairs fireplace. The flue on one side was for the oil burners and the flue on the other side for the downstairs stove.
The fireplace is mainly a decoration but we can burn in it or add a wood burner or gas fireplace log set.
Options have been built in.
 

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It’s not bad putting up a chimney really , just stack the pipes and twist them and they lock .
I add a couple ofSS screws on each pipe. I’ve had people twist the pipe cleaning it and they come apart .
Even Building one out of chimney lock/ flue is easy it’s just stacking blocks with clay flue on the inside . You just need to be able to lift the blocks .
Almost all manufacturers have locking rings and putting screws in stainless pipe would possibly void any guarantee via the manufacturer install instructions and could void any payout of your insurance.

Screws in the pipe are for stove pipe not insulated chimney pipe.
 

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Yes I know but I’ve been do it for 40 years and it works .
I wish they all had lock rings .
The screw would have to cause a problem for them to void the warranty .
 

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30 years ago, a neighbor had a small (650 sq ft?) cabin with a wood burning stove and a small oven like the one pictured, installed in the stove pipe. It was not as fancy as this one, nor big as this one, but she could bake a loaf of bread in it. There was also a model that came with a fan that could be installed in the circle in the middle to circulate air. The square one is even one step bigger, though you would probably have to burn a bigger fire with the square one.
 

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View attachment 355666 View attachment 355667 30 years ago, a neighbor had a small (650 sq ft?) cabin with a wood burning stove and a small oven like the one pictured, installed in the stove pipe. It was not as fancy as this one, nor big as this one, but she could bake a loaf of bread in it. There was also a model that came with a fan that could be installed in the circle in the middle to circulate air. The square one is even one step bigger, though you would probably have to burn a bigger fire with the square one.
My neighbor felt that there was an insignificant amount of heat lost from the house by using the oven. Also - sorry if I missed this - what kind of wood will you be using it? will it be well seasoned? When a mfg says that a wood stove is suitable for 800-1000 sq ft, the 1000 sq ft end is probably based on you buying well seasoned, high quality wood (as well as how well insulated your house is, etc.) The same goes for a stove that will burn up to 10 hours on a "load". Maximum time is most ideal (expensive) wood. Just because you buy a bigger stove, does not necessarily mean that it will burn a longer time with a load of wood - it will just make the house hotter while the wood is burning. You may also want to search through homesteading forums as well - hunters, cabin dwellers, etc. It is not an enjoyable experience to wake up at 6 a.m. only to find that the fire went out at 3:30 or 4 a.m. and the house is now colder than the outside!
 

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Cool little oven , I would think it has a bypass so the fire can go strait up when you are starting the stove .
The manufactures spec on the stove was close in the 80s and 90s todaynot so much .
The new stove need bone dry wood to reach there rated out and even then you don’t get a real number, I always go by the low figure on the stove literature .
The soap stone stoves don’t get as hot as the cast iron or steal units .
My stove holds heat for 24 hours it warm to the touch but not heating it’s surroundings.
Large chunks of bone dry wood will burn the longest and give the most heat .
Softer wood burn hot and fast .
Ive never bought fire wood , I cut and split my own so it stacks in the stove .
Large chunks that fill your box is best , you know your wood is dry when you can place a log
On a inch of coals and it burns with good flame .
I’ve stoped trying to get over night heat , I drop a couple big thick logs in the stove at bed time .
I just want to have hot coals in the morning for a fast start .
I use some soft wood to make coffee in the morning
 
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