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I have been doing a dog leg on my stovepipes for over 50 years and not had one creosote fire.
Generally, a stovepipe is cleaned in the spring.
Secondly, If you burn softwoods you will get more soot than if you burn hardwoods, and sometimes I mixed them.
 

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Thanks AJ. Cooking isn't the primary concern but by nature I like to extract every ounce of utility from any purchase, especially something that costs as much as one of these units. As for the blowers, I have a bigger 2 story home to heat and need a bit larger unit and thinking the blower(s) will make it more efficient.
If you have central heat and air you can circulate with your furnace fan.Could actually run off gen if 120volts by making a cord type disconnect?
 

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I have been doing a dog leg on my stovepipes for over 50 years and not had one creosote fire.
Generally, a stovepipe is cleaned in the spring.
Secondly, If you burn softwoods you will get more soot than if you burn hardwoods, and sometimes I mixed them.
And I've never had a fire call to a house until it's burning.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Blaze King.
Our Princess carries our 2000 sq ft single story house with no problem. Open floor plan in the living areas, 3 beds/2 baths with all door openings at the end of a long hall. The bedrooms are a bit cooler but we prefer it that way. We close our bedroom at night to keep it cool in all but the most brutal weather.

We've had the Princess installed here since 2014. We just installed a convection deck and blowers this year. They have made a noticeable difference in the efficiency of the stove and in moving the heat off of the stove and into the convection currents in the house.

Blaze King uses a proprietary thermocoupler type thermostat rather than a simple damper. Using blowers to strip heat off of the stove and send it out into the house actually helps the stove burn more efficiently.

The blowers act as a rear shield as well, allowing a closer installation.

That being said, it's a fine stove even without the blowers.

You could acquire an Ecofan or similar for use when the power goes out. They aren't cheap and reviews are mixed so we went with Blaze King standard blowers instead.

The Princess, the larger King, and most other Blaze King stoves and inserts are CAT stoves, equipped with a catalytic converter. Other posters are correct: the wood must be dry. On the other hand, since the government is increasingly going after wood stoves as polluters, having a high efficiency stove out of the gate might put you beyond their grasp for at least a while.

Blaze King warranties their CATS for 10 years. We are in year 7 and the CAT is still going strong. We do have a replacement CAT and spare gasket on hand.

Good friends of ours heat with an outdoor wood furnace which is equipped with a powerful blower. Because of the advanced drying capacity of the fan combined with the larger capacity of the furnace's fire box, they can burn wet wood. They aren't winning any prizes for low emissions, however.

They live on a farm in the country and their furnace doesn't seem to bother anyone.

He does not have a whole house generator and the furnace does not run/push heat into the ductwork without the fan. So unless he hooks up a portable generator he has no heat during a power outage.

A few years ago a guy in the nearest large metro area installed an outdoor wood burning furnace in his suburban neighborhood, to code. Neighbors had a fit and raised such a stink about it that it ended up on the local news. So there's that.

I am not sure about the current product line up but IIRC Blaze King used to have one non CAT stove still in its stable.

Hands down the easiest, cleanest stove I've ever seen. No problems getting it lit or keeping it lit. Super efficient in terms of wood use. We burn about 2 cords of wood from October through April and only very rarely turn the HVAC on, usually only if we are away for longer than a couple of days.

Husband cleans the chimney and stove pipe every spring, and we pull the stove pipe and flame guard and clean both sides of the CAT. We might get a scant cup of fine ash out of the chimney, the stove pipe and from behind the CAT. Wood burns down to nothing. We go for weeks without shoveling out the stove. Just burn it hot once a day for a half hour or so to clean the glass and the chimney.

Bonus round our house doesn't smell like wood stove or creosote.

Customer service and support are excellent

Our homeowners insurance required proof of professional installation in order to keep our policy, which we provided, but did not raise our rates.

The county mandated an inspection, which was done on the day of installation, no problems.

Have fun in your search!
 

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Discussion Starter #46
We went to two different dealers yesterday. Home Depot first and ten local business. The local vendor had Vermont designs and another line called Regency. The vermont designs was expensive , $3500 just for the unit and seems to be not so user friendly. The other unit they had, Regency was about $2100 but seemed much easier to use for someone new to wood burning. The key will be when their installers come out to assess how the wood stove will be installed and how from the chimney flu perspective.

We have some friends and family getting my Wife all riled up about the soot , filth and smell from a wood stove, I'd rather be toasty warm and able to fix vittles than worry about some soot on the walls. Any opinions on how to limit soot and dirt to minimize wall washing and painting ?
 

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Soot? Wall washing and painting? I ran a wood stove for 23 years, there was no more need for wall washing and painting there than where we had other forms of heat.
 

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One thing I like about our older home is that it was constructed with a wood pass thru. They are basically a small door on the outside, a space to stack in stove wood and a door on the inside next to the stove. Every place else i have heated with wood the mess comes from packing the firewood in.
 

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NRA Life 1971
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Yeah, the Vermont Casting Defiant goes for 3500 now. They were 500 in 79 when I got mine. I found a couple who had one that was a year old and way too big for there tiny house. I got it for 300.
 

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I have been doing a dog leg on my stovepipes for over 50 years and not had one creosote fire.
Generally, a stovepipe is cleaned in the spring.
Secondly, If you burn softwoods you will get more soot than if you burn hardwoods, and sometimes I mixed them.
I also like to have a horizontal section. You are getting beat up pretty good in this thread so I figured I'd give you some support. We can be the outcasts.

I burn 100% pine and clean my chimney 2-3 times a year. I really don't have a problem with that.
 

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yes a little Horizontal pipe isnot the end of the world.
I just would not do it .
‘in my houses I have flues that run up the center of the house and use a damper 2’ up my chimneys are 23’ tall so I have a lot of draft .
 

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I would look at hearth stone , VC went down hill . Jotol is good allso
Blaze king burn real good allso if you want a Cheeper steel stove .
If you burn a hot fire you won’t have a smokysmell there could be a little more dust around .
‘if you keep your wood under cover it should be fairly clean coming in the house .
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Those 'friends and family' will be joining you when they have no power or heat.
That's exactly what I said to my Wife ! The wood stove is going in come hell or high water. Anyone familiar with the Regency line of stoves ?
 

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We went to two different dealers yesterday. Home Depot first and ten local business. The local vendor had Vermont designs and another line called Regency. The vermont designs was expensive , $3500 just for the unit and seems to be not so user friendly. The other unit they had, Regency was about $2100 but seemed much easier to use for someone new to wood burning. The key will be when their installers come out to assess how the wood stove will be installed and how from the chimney flu perspective.

We have some friends and family getting my Wife all riled up about the soot , filth and smell from a wood stove, I'd rather be toasty warm and able to fix vittles than worry about some soot on the walls. Any opinions on how to limit soot and dirt to minimize wall washing and painting ?
If your going to use this stove for a long period of time theres a few things I would like to offer for wood being my primary heat for decades.
Get one with an ash drawer.
Get one with a thermostatic air intake
And get one with a big fire box.

Ash drawer so you can run it for months with no re lighting. Thermostatic damper so the stove will self regulate the air/heat. A big firebox so you can burn it all night when is 0*f out and still have a house that's 70* when you wake up.

My stove is a Vermont castings defiant. I believe it's the same model sold today. My girlfriend had no trouble running it the first winter she every spent any time around a wood stove. She actualy loves the stove, the heat it produces is very even. We hardly get any rise and fall of temps overnight.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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If your going to use this stove for a long period of time theres a few things I would like to offer for wood being my primary heat for decades.
Get one with an ash drawer.
Get one with a thermostatic air intake
And get one with a big fire box.

Ash drawer so you can run it for months with no re lighting. Thermostatic damper so the stove will self regulate the air/heat. A big firebox so you can burn it all night when is 0*f out and still have a house that's 70* when you wake up.

My stove is a Vermont castings defiant. I believe it's the same model sold today. My girlfriend had no trouble running it the first winter she every spent any time around a wood stove. She actualy loves the stove, the heat it produces is very even. We hardly get any rise and fall of temps overnight.
Ditto.

We didn't bother with the ash drawer on the Princess; the little hole through which we'd push the ash was stupid small. We have a Powersmith ash vacuum GET ONE! YOU WILL NOT REGRET IT! and when we are shoveling out the cool stove, we just set it up next to the ash bucket with the hose propped just so, so it sucks any poof of dust into the ash vacuum as we shovel out the ash. We have galvanized trash cans outside on gravel, with a landscaping paver in the bottom of each trash can, and a landscape paver on the lid, as safeguards against our winter winds here.

Powersmith ash vacuums are WARM ash vacuums, NOT HOT ash vacuums. Warm ash vacuums are what is typically available on the retail market. Hot ash vacuums are unusual on the retail/homeowner consumer market, and are typically used by professional stove techs and chimney sweeps. You are not going to use it to vacuum out glowing cinders. However, it won't be the end of the world or the end of your house if you vacuum up the random ember in a 'cold' stove or from around the stove.

We have a routine for loading the Princess if she's humming along:
1. Turn thermocoupler t-stat (what stands for a 'damper' in Blaze Kings) all the way open.
2. Open the CAT bypass so the CAT is offline. Do not leave the CAT bypass open with the stove running wide open for any length of time. That opening is not made to take max stove temps and it can warp. Got this directly from Blaze King's vice president. If the stove is humming along, just open the CAT bypass long enough to get her loaded.
3. Fetch several splits from porch.
4. Open stove door SLOWLY. Opening door slowly will help limit/prevent back draft (thus limiting soot and smell in the house) and will also limit the fireworks/shower of sparks that can occur if outside winds are high and/or your wood is very dry. Ask me how I know this, LOL.
5. Load stove. Close and latch door.
6. CLOSE BYPASS if the stove is in the active CAT range. If not, keep the CAT offline until the stove reaches active CAT temps. There's a separate CAT t-stat on top of the stove that shows this temp range quite clearly. If you must walk away from the stove, err on the side of caution and engage the CAT/put it back in line, even if the stove is not quite up to active CAT temps yet. A stove with an active bed of hot cinders and fresh dry fuel and a hot stove pipe and chimney isn't going to stall out. Likely, it will take off as soon as you walk away. Ask my recently retired husband- he's had the hardest time getting that timing right. He's finally learned just to engage the CAT a little early and/or to set a timer on his phone to go back and check on the stove.
Anyway, the bottom line, engage the CAT if the stove is in active CAT range temps, a little before that if you must step away.
7. Set the thermocoupler thermostat to the general temperature at which you wish to run the stove. This gets familiar quickly. You'll figure out quickly what your house needs based on outside temps, stove size, etc.
8. Refill the steamer on the stove top with water.
9. Grab your Powersmith ash vac and clean up around the hearth/stove.

This process takes me about 5 to 7 minutes, about 3 or 4 times per 24 hour period in mid winter.

I too vote for a stove with a thermocouple air flow system as opposed to a traditional damper.

The modern CAT stoves burn infinitely cleaner than the old smoke dragons. Far less back draft, far less chance of creosote build up with dry wood. Far less poofs of smoke in the house, far less soot, far less odor. As I said earlier, we've been burning wood in this house since 2014. Our house doesn't smell or look sooty. I do know what that's like. I was an earlier teenager when the Arab Oil Embargo hit and everyone and his dog started buying whatever wood stove they could find and afford, and burning wood that was no where near cured enough. My family didn't go the wood stove route, my stepmother was terrified of them. We had individual room zone electric heat so we basically turned the thermostat down or off in several rooms of the house and lived around the fireplace in the closed off family room. Wasn't the best solution but for that house, without forced air HVAC, it wasn't the worst solution either.

The first house we owned had a chimney with issues from the start/construction, and was further abused by the installation of a wood stove that was way outsized for the room and floorplan and honestly for the house. Then the previous owners proceeded to burn wet pine, of all things. The house reeked of creosote and everything was sooty. We repainted (and repainted, and repainted) replaced all wall paper and carpet and vinyl. Try as we and several professionals might, we could NOT clear that chimney of creosote. Why those people didn't have a chimney fire, I'll never know. Why we didn't have a chimney fire trying to burn the creosote off after several professional cleanings, I'll never know. The chimney ran up the side of the house right in between the kids' rooms- both their kids and ours occupied the same rooms- I guess our guardian angels worked a lot of overtime on that one.

In the process of burning off the creosote we discovered structural issues with the chimney, can you imagine walking outside and seeing smoke coming off of the roof from in between your shingles? Called the fire department, of course- told them there were no flames- my husband had already hit the attic with every flashlight he owned. No panic, can you just swing by and take a look? We've closed the damper and we're letting the fire die out.

OMG THEY SHOWED UP FIVE MINUTES LATER, SIRENS AND LIGHTS, EVERY PIECE OF EQUIPMENT THEY HAD AND ABOUT 500 FIREMEN. It was, entertaining. The kids were over the moon. I can't say I objected to the arrival of 500 firemen, the visual was pretty amazing. My husband was somewhere between alarmed, pissed and apoplectic.

"WHAT DID YOU SAY TO THE DISPATCHER???"
"That there was smoke but no flame...???"

The chief rescued me. "She was very calm on the phone. She told us there was no visible flame, but we cannot ignore smoke coming out from under your shingles. Smoke should never come out from under shingles."

They pressurized the house, which was interesting, and no fire flamed up. But that confirmed a structural issue with the chimney in addition to the reeking and dangerous creosote. We called in the big guns specialists then and had the entire chimney re-poured with a full ceramic liner. The masonry chimney itself was stable enough but the liner was FUBAR'd, as in it was missing in about a 3 foot section near the roofline. Like, the liner had never been installed in that section of chimney. Pouring a solid ceramic liner fixed it.

After that experience I too swore I'd never have a wood stove in my house.

Patient and knowledgeable people educated us, and we are grateful for that.

I'm pretty solidly sold on Blaze King. Doubt I'd ever own any other brand. They are just so reliable and easy to operate. Also difficult to overfire. I suppose it could be done; anything is possible, but you'd have to work at it.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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yes a little Horizontal pipe isnot the end of the world.
I just would not do it .
‘in my houses I have flues that run up the center of the house and use a damper 2’ up my chimneys are 23’ tall so I have a lot of draft .
We had to install a stainless steel chimney in this house, there was no original chimney or fireplace.
We have 9' ceilings throughout the house, so we have about 5.75' of stove pipe from the top of the stove to the ceiling. We have a 45' elbow at ceiling level to avoid an attic joist. Then we have however many feet of chimney to traverse a standard pitch truss roof on a rancher, and then however many feet above the roofline to code.

Point being, we have a 45' elbow less than 6' above the stove, then a pretty standard height chimney to traverse a truss roof of standard pitch for a rancher and to rise those few feet required above the roof line. Draft is never a problem unless the stovepipe and chimney are cold. That's what fire starters and newspaper and small splits are for- to warm up the chimney quick and to create that draw/draft. :)

We would have preferred a straight shot, but that would have pushed our stove a solid half foot or more out into the room. That wouldn't have been the end of the world, but it wouldn't have been as aesthetic in terms of placement in the house.
 

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I here ya , I have a little chimney trick for you
I pic my stove , then put a nail in the floor
In the center of the flue , then frame the house around the pipe 😝 that way I can put the pipe in a good spot .
 

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I once tried to make a smoker in line with the stove pipe,
but I had trouble getting a good seal so I abandoned the idea.
I may try again another time.
 

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A smoker in your chimney would be bad ,
your smoke for food needs to be really moving air in air out or it would cover the food with creosote .
 
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