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Cooking tools is something that is often over looked, until shtf. My backup cooking device is a pit from a local sporting goods store. With this pit I am able to cook for 8 - 10 people at one time. In one of the pictures you can see a bunch of pork chops, this is a whole family pack cooking at one time.

For pork chops or steaks, the pit takes about 8 pieces of oak and/or pecan one foot long.

For cooking ribs, which is about a 3+ hour cook time, I use about 12 - 14 pieces of wood.

For cooking a brisket or pork loin, which is about at least a 4+ hour cook time I use around 14 pieces of wood.

My current wood shed is about 2 rows deep and three feet tall, and I have been using that for a year - but every day. We might cook out a couple of times a month. So if I had to, I could cook off this pit for a month with a full wood shed. Then add the two cords in my fall back position.
 

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For the second time you forgot to post your address! (I already know when to show-up for dinner!) Good info on wood consumption.
 

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For the second time you forgot to post your address! (I already know when to show-up for dinner!) Good info on wood consumption.
What Kenno said!!!! I was drooling after the 2nd picture. I salute you! :)
 

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brick BBQ

I would have to agree. My problem is that I have an all electric house, and if power goes out - oh well. Good thing is that we have plenty of green wood outside, and I am sure I could make a campfire to cook on.

But I need something that would be more elaborate for long-term and intensive cooking -at least 5 people day in and day out. In good weather and bad. I have thought about Kev's BBQ pit made of propane tanks, however, from my research, looks like those tanks can run a couple or few hundred dollars apice. Add to that expense the welding, which I cannot do, and other materials.

So I have thought about a round in-ground fire pit BBQ made of bricks. Then came across a idea that is better yet. A brick built BBQ. Problem is that would be statonary, and would only be good for a bug out location. Anyways, I am in the research stage on this project, but I thought I would post the links that I have undug in case anyone would be interested in this idea. They are below. It may take several months to make my particular plans and get started, but once I do so, I will post a follow up in case anyone may be interested.

http://www.askthebuilder.com/B181_Brick_Barbeque_Design_.shtml

http://www.askthebuilder.com/B181_Dry_Stack_Barbeque_Plan.shtml

http://geocities.com/swinetinglingbbq/brickpit.html

http://www.azbbqa.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=12&Itemid=56

http://www.thesmokering.com/pits/brickpit/pit1/default.jsp

http://www.thesmokering.com/pits/brickpit/pit2/default.jsp

http://bbq.about.com/gi/dynamic/off...u=http://www.ibiblio.org/lineback/bbq/wdh.htm

Aside from BBQ, I was thinking of adding a cast iron cooktop if I can find one - just the top from an old cast iron stove. Sure I could cook in a pot/pan over a grill, but that would be much less efficient than a cooktop. Problem is that this will be out in the weather. I am also trying to figure out how to shelter this from the rain without risk of burning the overhead shelter since I have to think about cooking in rain or shine.

Anyways, these are just some thoughts.
 

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CHEERS :p
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so kev....

your meat/vegies are not over any coals/wood

the wood burning in the drum is next to the grill......?

thanks
 

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http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=12885

this is what we built here. Other than being made of brick and using wood, it is no different than any other kitchen stove/ oven. This is where i do all my cooking since we built it
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Diligaf,

Looks like you are way ahead of me on this. I saw your pics. Where are you putting the wood? Looks like you have two chambers; one under the iron cooktop and another under the oven. So do you put your wood in one or both? In other words, if you are baking, do you put the wood in the chamber under the cooktop to generate indirect heat into the oven, or are the cooktop and oven completely separate units which are just joined at the hips? I would imagine that if you are using the cooktop, you want direct heat under it.

Also, where did you get your cooktop and the oven door? I am looking for an old cooktop and need ideas.

Very useful series of posts. Thanks.
 

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Thats a great looking wood fired oven. And good use of scrounged material...........
Its One thingto buy all our things its another to scrounge them up and make something useful from others discards. A true survivalist spirit.
 

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I myself in a TSHTF situation do not want to send up a plum of smoke! Lets tell every hungry person within 3 to 5 miles, I have food and it is dinner time.

I have a Sierra Zip stove. I have used the Woodgas. Both work well. I have liquid fuel set aside for no less then 90 days of cooking in the house. Once that is gone I will be using the Zip stove and coals with a box stove for a time.

Don

I have been dehydrating noodles and rice for the first 30 days use, so all I really have to do is boil water to have a hot meal.
 

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We burn wood in the winter, and my father inlaw is a mad man when it comes to keeping wood. We don't burn wood in the house, only in the shop when we work. We have right now, stacked under a dedicated shed a little less than 25 rank of wood. We'll do good to burn it before it rots!!

I have been buggin' the MRS. to fund my building of a brick oven in the yard.
How cool would a brick oven pizza be WTSHTF. WAIT:eek: The smell would probably attract un-wanted visitors though.
Seriously, I intend to build/buy something to cook on. I been hitting Craig's list for a wood burning kitchen stove to put under the gazebo outside. Well not a gazebo, a 12'x12' concrete pad w/ a roof:D
 

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DIY RPG's
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i"ve got a house fuel oil tank that i plan on cutting in half and putting hinges on the one side with a little smoke stack on one side then mount it all to a trailer with a wood holding area on said trailer as well but for now i'm figurin how to cut the tank in half without the fumes catchin fire , cant wash it out with water cause i'd have to pour the water out onto the ground
 

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I've got the same smoker from probably the same store. "the right stuff the right price" lol.
As you know you can stretch your wood supply by cooking as many things at one time as possible.
Smoked meat keeps a lot longer than fesh so it makes sense to do everything at once.
I play around with foil on the smokestack to make an improvised damper - which lengthens the burntime and reduces the temp. Great for briskets.

I myself in a TSHTF situation do not want to send up a plum of smoke! Lets tell every hungry person within 3 to 5 miles, I have food and it is dinner time.
People can smell bbq miles away. It's not always a bad thing. I don't like going for too long without talking to someone. I also don't like food going to waste. It IS being smoked to keep a little longer but a chance for a get together and catching up on the latest news would be worth a few porkchops.
Not the case for everyone but I can't see automaticaly chasing away someone who I would normaly invite over or offer them something if they showed up.
Might just be a southern hospitality thing. ;)
 

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If things were real bad, I would do my cooking about 2-3 AM. I mean can you imagine if you only had enough for you and yours, and families with small children starving show up:eek: I don't wanna deal with that.
 

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That looks like a neat setup. You stated that you purchased this setup? I'm from MN and I have not come across a wood burning BBQ grill.
 

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In our portable elk camp we have a light weight folding wood stove to cook on and boil coffee as well as heat inside a medium sized command tent. The addition of just a grill frame is one we will add for open fire cooking. The stove is used for heat and soak of dried meals but now i'm drooling after seeing the pics. Thx.
 

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I had a smoker set up just like that when I lived in East Texas myself. Sadly when I moved I had to leave it behind.
It is practically a requirement in Texas to know how to grill and BBQ. I like to exceed the standards and have 2 grills, 1 standard and one propane.
I love my hickory BBQ'ing.
Steven Raichlen has some good info for the grilling deficient folks out there.http://www.barbecuebible.com/
 
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