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I need some ideas for my commuting survival kit in Wisconsin. I am particularly interested in what foods one might include. In my area they will be frozen solid when kept in the car in the winter. Granola bars? Slim Jims? When you get stuck in a snowy ditch for a day or more ya get hungry. What would keep well in a car that might warm up on a pleasant winter day? Jerky? Chocolate seems out of the question (freeze and thaw). I have all the other stuff, fire starter, blankets, candle, stuff like that. Food and water my main concern here. Maybe this has been posted by others already. If so just steer me to the thread.
Thanks,
frozen flea
 

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dum dum
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go to costco and buy a BOX of the regular SlimJim's...I think they come 20 to a pack. Or buy two boxes. They are full of calories in the form of fat and protein...then throw a bag of crackers in as well.
 

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Warlord of the wastes
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Granola would be pretty tough to eat frozen. I agree with the slim jims, they will stay pliant enough to eat, although you can heat up granola enough so it's softer just with body heat.
 

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cute is not always enough
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Have a look through this. I like the idea of the linked coffee can heater but have not tried it.

Ramen or cup-O-soup should keep well in the cold and a nice bowl of broth might be just the thing on a cold day. Depending on your type of vehicle it could be hard to make heat/hot water. so many cars these days are basically completely covered with flammable upholstery or rug.
 

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Mountain Critter
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Some of the more "cakelike" energy bars (like Clif Bar) are OK frozen, but I've nearly lost teeth trying to eat a frozen Power Bar! Not a good idea...

How about a jar of peanut butter or Nutella? Lots of calories and fat, does not freeze solid, and does not require cooking/heating to eat.
 

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Freedom Is Not Free
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Here's my winter car ration:
2-1 qt bottles water(go inside every night)
2 mre's w/heaters
1 or 2 cereal bars(these always seem to go during an afternoon snack attack)
a couple packs of oatmeal, inst coco, and coffee.
alcohol burner and cup.
 

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The Punisher
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Those cheese crackers with peanut butter, I always carry a bunch in my vehicles. If you can afford it and own a truck, I would throw a winch on there. It has proven valuable to me on several occasions, as well as a tow strap for someone to pull you out of the ditch if need be. Here in Alaska, people rarely stay stuck for long, as someone will happen by and help you out.:thumb:
 

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I need some ideas for my commuting survival kit in Wisconsin. I am particularly interested in what foods one might include. In my area they will be frozen solid when kept in the car in the winter. Granola bars? Slim Jims? When you get stuck in a snowy ditch for a day or more ya get hungry. What would keep well in a car that might warm up on a pleasant winter day? Jerky? Chocolate seems out of the question (freeze and thaw). I have all the other stuff, fire starter, blankets, candle, stuff like that. Food and water my main concern here. Maybe this has been posted by others already. If so just steer me to the thread.
Thanks,
frozen flea
Flea, there really aren't any roads in Southern Wisconsin where you would need to worry much about food, water is much more important, and bottled water isnt a good idea, a handful of bagged water would be your best bet as they could be easily thawed by body heat inside a jacket if necessary ( they are usually only 8 oz.). Bottled water on the other hand, has a greater thermal mass and you run the risk of being chilled trying to thaw it. Food wise, you will need carbs above protiens. Carbs will by and far help maintain your body temperature more than any other food, in the short term situation of being trapped in a car in the snow. But in the winter you will dehydrate quickly due to the relatively low humidity level, and eating snow isnt safe unless you can boil it after melting. Also, you would be best suited spending money on flares and similar warning devices as almost all of our roads are traveled in all but the most severe storms, and when you consider that in Wisconsin over one quarter of all vehicles are 4x4s the likelyhood of you sitting unseen in a ditch more than six hours is minimal unless you have done something really foolish. Next, if you don't already have a cell phone, a cheap prepaid phone is money well spent for this very reason ( a gps is handy as well so that you can give an exact location). Also consider adding a handful of those air activated handwarmers, or body or foot warmers, to thaw frozen water fingers feet nads or whatever.

Also don't worry about chocolate freezing and thawing, it wont hurt it. It may not look appetizing but it wont hurt it's edibility or palatibility.
 

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Ramen can be really yummy if you just break it up in a plastic bag and add the flavorings, no need to add water or cook it.

One problem I haven't solved it how to prevent water from freezing?

Anyways the main thing I keep is a small shovel, kitty litter and some good gloves. Getting out of a snow bank is usually what's needed most in my parts. If you wait you could be stuck for a long time waiting for someone to come, plus here they'll probably make you pay for the help.
 

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Don't forget a quart of Jack.

I know you Wisconsinites prefer Schlitz and Blatz with your Sheboygan brats, but that will freeze in your trunk. You're going to have to suck it up and drink Jack with your beef sticks.



PS -- Born and raised in the Badger State.
 

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Don't forget a quart of Jack.

I know you Wisconsinites prefer Schlitz and Blatz with your Sheboygan brats, but that will freeze in your trunk. You're going to have to suck it up and drink Jack with your beef sticks.



PS -- Born and raised in the Badger State.
NO NO NO it's miller or tough schlitz...
 

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dum dum
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Wild Turkey 101 won't freeze, and goes good when you make my most delicious secret snack...whole grain wheat english muffin with peanut butter, honey, and sliced up slim jim sticks..MMMmmMMMMmm! OK, the honey would freeze...so I suggest the meat sticks and Wild Turkey 101.¹
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¹DISCLAIMER: DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL TO TRY TO KEEP WARM...lessen youz wanna die.
 

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Wild Turkey 101 won't freeze, and goes good when you make my most delicious secret snack...whole grain wheat english muffin with peanut butter, honey, and sliced up slim jim sticks..MMMmmMMMMmm! OK, the honey would freeze...so I suggest the meat sticks and Wild Turkey 101.¹
__________________
¹DISCLAIMER: DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL TO TRY TO KEEP WARM...lessen youz wanna die.
AS the old cowboy says to the tenderfoot when bit in the..........by a rattle snake when said tenderfoot didnt look where he was peeing ''Sorry thar tenderfoot but you gonna die"
 

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Nerd
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I second the other person who said MREs.... lots and lots of calories and carbs to keep ya warm, and you only need a tiny bit of water to activate the warmer, which you can then use to defrost more water
 

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I second the other person who said MREs.... lots and lots of calories and carbs to keep ya warm, and you only need a tiny bit of water to activate the warmer, which you can then use to defrost more water
When I first got my BOB going, I had MRE's in it. I live in Minnesota and realized after one winter...MRE's freeze. The included heaters do little when the entree package is a solid block. I took all the MRE's out and replaced them with Mountain House Pro-Paks. Helps significantly cut down on the weight. More likely that I can build a fire, boil water and use it in the Mountain House packs. Spose you could just use the boiled water to thaw the MRE's but, seemed easier to me to do the boiled water / dehydrated food instead.

As for the jerky, it's insanely easy to make and much cheaper. After watching Alton Brown's Good Eats on Food Network, I gave it a try a few days ago. No food dehydrator necessary. Just used a box fan, bungie cords and 4 furnace filters. The recipe says use paper ones, but try as I might, I couldn't find paper. So I just got the closest I could find and instead of putting the meat directly on the filter and getting fiberglass in it, I put down paper towels instead. It cut down on the air flow a bit and took longer (24 hours instead of the listed 12), but still worked and tasted phenomenal when done.

Here is the recipe if interested: Alton Brown's Good Eats jerkey recipe
 

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Prepared
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You folks in Wisconsin have the same winters as we do in Minnesota. In winter, we have basically unlimited (and clean near the surface) snow, ice, etc. You just need a means of thawing it. Offhand, I'd say propane stove, pot, and large supply of camp matches, firestarters and a good ax for a backup. That's the strange irony of survival Dec-Feb here in the upper-midwest. The temperatures overnight will easily kill you, but there's no shortage of procurable water.
 
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