Survivalist Forum banner
  • Are you passionate about survivalism? Would you like to write about topics that interest you and get paid for it? Read all about it here!
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a rookie when it comes to survival skills and just started to wake up to the need of these skills in the later part of 2008. I had my first training in winter survival last weekend. It was actually exhilirating, informative, and enjoyable. My teacher is ex-army trained in Alaska. It was fun until the sun goes down then I was in for a wake up call. I made it though and am now pumped to keep training and building skills.Now I have a better idea of what to expect and can prepare much better.

When I hear people talk about just disappearing into the woods when SHTF with no training now I know how crazy that is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
The methods of survival in different climates is intrigueing, the numerous ways in which one part of the world would work , then into another and backfire is mind boggling. I look at the basic members of modern society and think, if mankind began this weak and fragile, we'd have never made it. Congrat's on your personal revelation that brought you into this communities reality.
 
  • Like
Reactions: joes

·
Hiker,Tracker,Hunter
Joined
·
79 Posts
Maine is a great place to practice winter survival, i've been honing my skills for the last 3 years. Shelter is key, prepare one in an earlier season if possible, but make sure the snow doesn't make it collapse. Also try to find a sheltered area, such as a deer yard or stand of softwood trees, gives you insulation from wind and precipitation and you may have yourself a great meal.
 

·
Tested in the Wilderness
Joined
·
6,724 Posts
I am a rookie when it comes to survival skills and just started to wake up to the need of these skills in the later part of 2008. I had my first training in winter survival last weekend. It was actually exhilirating, informative, and enjoyable. My teacher is ex-army trained in Alaska. It was fun until the sun goes down then I was in for a wake up call. I made it though and am now pumped to keep training and building skills.Now I have a better idea of what to expect and can prepare much better.

When I hear people talk about just disappearing into the woods when SHTF with no training now I know how crazy that is.
Very crazy and what many say are people who are posers and wannabes and maybe they do not ever Actually experience the wilderness and get their hands dirty?

Most of the Rocky Mountains is a great place to practice winter and all kinds of survival. Should know what one is doing though for too many die every year camping, hiking, skiing and they do not respect the mountains and the potential danger. Maybe people know that it does not take below freezing to get hypothermia? If people get wet and chilled even at fifty degrees can be bad. Most people should not hike alone although I almost always have. I just try to be real careful and aware of my surroundings and prepared.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Where did you train? Like which state?
Upstate New York. I figure I should train in my area first sense that would be the climate I have to deal with. I will also train at different times of the year as well. Eventually my trainer wants to take me up far north just in case I would have to travel in that direction with my BOB if SHTF.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
I am a rookie when it comes to survival skills and just started to wake up to the need of these skills in the later part of 2008. I had my first training in winter survival last weekend. It was actually exhilirating, informative, and enjoyable. My teacher is ex-army trained in Alaska. It was fun until the sun goes down then I was in for a wake up call. I made it though and am now pumped to keep training and building skills.Now I have a better idea of what to expect and can prepare much better.

When I hear people talk about just disappearing into the woods when SHTF with no training now I know how crazy that is.
So what are some of the biggest revelations that you discovered during your training?

What was one of the things you had to do where you found yourself saying, "I would have never though of that but now this can save my life!"

And tell us something that was counterintuitive. Something that you would have probably thought to do before your training but now realize would have been a bad idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So what are some of the biggest revelations that you discovered during your training?

What was one of the things you had to do where you found yourself saying, "I would have never though of that but now this can save my life!"

And tell us something that was counterintuitive. Something that you would have probably thought to do before your training but now realize would have been a bad idea.
A Revelation well the first thing I started to realize is how strong the elements of nature can be and how fragile we humans can be when coddled by civilization. How much of humanity has weakened itself by rejecting the simple knowledge of how to survive on our planet without being cared for like mice in cages for example. My trainer was telling me of what the woods looked like before everything was clearcut and I felt angry at how disrespectful our culture is of nature and how we take it for granted.

Never thought of well I said that many times during the trip. The coolest thing I did not know was when we could not get wood to burn and snow covered everything. We found a dead birch tree and we cut it down. Then we stripped the bark and it burned beatufilly because of the oils in it. This helped get a fire going pretty quickly. Also getting a fire started mutliple ways is something that comes in handy lol. I also never would have thought how great pine trees can be used for bedding and insulation to build a shelter.

I never really got ahead of my trainer. The only thing I would have screwed up is allowing myself to overheat with too many layers and sweat which is bad news in the winter.
 

·
Proverbs 22:3
Joined
·
897 Posts
Maine is a great place to practice winter survival, i've been honing my skills for the last 3 years. Shelter is key, prepare one in an earlier season if possible, but make sure the snow doesn't make it collapse. Also try to find a sheltered area, such as a deer yard or stand of softwood trees, gives you insulation from wind and precipitation and you may have yourself a great meal.
I just taught a class on snowcaves to some cub scouts last night. Two tips: If the mound of snow is solid enough to walk on, you can build in it. Also, before you start to dig into the pile, find some sticks about 12 inches long. Push the sticks into the snow where you intend to dig and leave them there. When you are inside digging, stop when you find the bottom of the sticks. The roof will be thick enough for support and insulation, but thin enough so you will not be trapped if it comes down. (Make sure to add some air holes, too.)
 

·
Prepared
Joined
·
15,924 Posts
We get bragging rights here in Minnesota for cold temperatures. I've gone winter camping (made a snow shelter) a couple times, and didn't care for it. But among my gear I have warm sleeping bags for the whole family, army surplus wool blankets, a backup propane heater and probably the best tool of all: my Jeep. Get the hell outta Dodge if the temperature is -30 and you've got no power/heat. If you find yourself stranded somewhere with no vehicle, no heat or no power, you've done a series of things terribly wrong and may not make the grade for the perpetuation of the species...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,814 Posts
It's cold everywhere including my state in Idaho. The snows have gotten so deep I could walk from the ground floor to the second story roof on snow and had to tunnel out of the building. We have back up for our back ups like wood furnaces, propane for cooking (emergency only), fire place. I maintain three sources of heat, two sources of water, and two years stored foods (alternating) I have cattle and have to take a trac snow blower to keep a path open to water and feed and blow snow away in a space for them to lay down. My truck disappeared this year in the snow parked in my driveway. This year we hit -30 again so I have to maintain some heat in the chicken coup. We are still walking on top of three feet of packed snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,814 Posts
Bivy sacks are essential to winter camping. I've spent quite a number of cold nights sleeping like a baby in a snow shelter with nothing but a sleeping bag and a good bivy sack. Just make sure you don't let your face slip into the sack because you will wind up wet from condensation. Nothing screws up a night of good cold weather like having to deal with being wet. And there is no worse wake-up than crawling out of your luke-warm, wet sleeping bag into the frigid air and having your clothes freeze before you can get a fire going.
 

·
Numquam Succumbe
Joined
·
4,173 Posts
So what are some of the biggest revelations that you discovered during your training?

What was one of the things you had to do where you found yourself saying, "I would have never though of that but now this can save my life!"

And tell us something that was counterintuitive. Something that you would have probably thought to do before your training but now realize would have been a bad idea.

It sounds basic, but I never would of imagined how hard it is to try and get a fire going in the dewy morning. I'll be stoking my fires in the middle of the night from now on. :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
here in montana they offer classes all the time thru various organizations. you attend class then you have the option of applying what you have learned out in the wild. one i attended was 3 nights 4 days. you get to select what items you want to take. they are supervised. some one with complete equipment will be there by you. he/she is an "expert" they do not talk to you, they actually keep score for you. the class and being out there is the best 1 2 combo i can think of
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,814 Posts
I have been winter camping in the snow since I was in high school. I try to get up there at least once a year. When I started bringing my friends, their first experiences bordered on insane. But each time they returned, they were a bit more comfortable and began to enjoy the trips.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top