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I have a source of five gallon buckets that held calcium hypochlorite pellets (for a swimming pool). Do you think these buckets would be safe to use for food storage after we clean them out thoroughly?
Thanks
 

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IMHO no except for canned food.


Go to a Burger King, Bakery, or in grocery store bakery and get buckets from whicheverf will give them free to you.

Take as read of what is below.

Is it safe to use Calcium Hypochlorite to treat water?

MSDS for CaCl2O2

http://www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/C0418.htm


Now this.

Shelf Life for Calcium Hypochlorite



http://safetycenter.navy.mil/afloat/...hthchanges.htm

Changes for Calcium Hypochlorite
There have been some changes to Calcium Hypochlorite from 2 years ago that we, at the Safety Center, are just now finding out about. Apparently, it is no longer a Type II hazardous material and is NOW a Type I hazardous material. What does that mean? It means its shelf life can no longer be extended. Type II materials are extendable and Type I is not, due to stability properties in its chemistry composition. Additionally, the shelf life is now 24 months versus 36 months.
During the next monthly inspection of your calcium hypochlorite lockers, check the status of the calcium hypochlorite and be sure to order new material as needed.

Listed below is the data received from the CHRIMP (Consolidated Hazardous Material Reutilization and Inventory Management Program) experts:

6810-00-255-0471, Calcium hypochlorite, Technical Shelf Life M (24 Months (Type I Non-Extendable)

Item used to be shelf-life (SL) Type II material until June 2001 under shelf-life code (SLC) 7 (36 Months). The SLC of this material was changed effective 01067 (8Mar2001) but it took three months to validate all federal automated systems. The SL was changed from type II, SLC 7 to type I, SLC M (24 months) based on quality data gathered from test results and technical information concerning stability of the product for storage.

Additional NSN's involved in SL change from type II, SLC 7 to type I, SLC M, which are managed by DSCR (S9G):

6810 00-238-8115
6810 00-255-0471
6810 01-065-2410
6810 01-358-4336
6810 01-368-3566
Furthermore, FSC will be changed to 6840 because these items require an EPA registration number and EPA label.

As a result of the above changes HTH is consistently found to be expired. Additionally HTH is consistently improperly stored. The HTH box is required to be white with red letters stating "HAZARDOUS MATERIAL - CALCIUM HYPOCHLORITE." It must have three holes drilled in the bottom of the box to ensure adequate ventilation. The bottles are required to be stored in sealed plastic or zip-lock bags. The box should never be stowed in an area where it could come in contact with paint, solvent, oils, grease, or combustible materials or where temperatures could exceed 100 degrees. Additionally, this locker is required to be inspected monthly by the MDR. All of the requirements for HTH can be found in COMNAVSUBFORINST 6000.2A and NSTM 670-5.5.
 

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NO! NO! NO! Don't put anything in those. Calcium hypochlorite (known as 'bleaching powder') is also used for bleaching cotton and linen and is used in the manufacture of chloroform, besides for pools, and it's very caustic and could damage tin canns.. Be safe, LittleRaven, and use them for carrying trash out or for weeds you've pulled, but nothing you would eat.
 

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NO NO NO. Never ever use a bucket that had chemicals in it for food or water storage. Store bullets or something like that in them. No food or water. the chemicals are in the plastic and will be there from now on. I work in the chemical industry and we would never sell a drum for anything like that. Please for you and your families sake don't do it.
 
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