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Hello all,

I plan to move into the wilderness of Alaska, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, or Wyoming(preferably 1000-2000m in elevation) next fall or the summer after that. My current plan is to find an abandoned cabin and live in it until I feel the need to move on either living in another abandoned cabin or a shelter I built myself(quinzhee, etc.). Although living in my own shelter from the start is a possibility. The duration of this experience should run at least 5 year to my lifetime, so the highest quality tools are a must.

I was hoping that forum members could post their opinions on what items they think is necessary. The limitations is that of course I will have to carry all the items on my person; I will probably be looking to carry a medium to large ruck sack and possibly two duffel bags and all the items should probably weigh less than 100 pounds. I will likely be traveling to a cabin on foot, although I would not mind an extended trek to a cabin.

I have moderate outdoor/survival experience. My experience includes hiking almost half of the AT, living off the land near Glacier National Park for a week, quinzhee building, flint knapping, bow and atlatl making, bowdrills, hand drills, making cordage, etc.

My philosophy regarding equipment in this particular situation is to carry as many useful items as I can since I want to prevent myself from being in a tough situation(which is bound to arise anyhow). This list of items should subsume a basic survival kit which many of us carry with us while hiking. The beginnings of the list (different lines=different items & /=alternatives):

Guide/Information:
Tom Brown's Wilderness Survival Guide
Local flora and fauna guidebook(not familiar with a specific one for that region)
Compact Medical book(not familiar with a specific one)

Knives:
Frost Mora Knife(Smaller knife)
Kabar USMC/SOG Seal pup(7-8" bowie)
Boning or Fillet knife(not familiar with any good ones, or if its necessary)
Machete or Kukri(not sure if its worth carrying)
Gransfors Forest Axe
Saw(possible saw on back of machete)
Leatherman
Dovo straight razor
Naniwa Waterstones: 220, 1000, 2000, 5000, 8000 and Diamond lapping stone

Cordage:
300 ft+ of 550 paracord
300 yd. 100lb fishing line

Kitchen utilities:
Few pots: .5L, 1L, ??
Few Bandanas(filters)
Platypus bottles 1L and 2L
Nalgene bottle

Clothes:
Ski hat
Ushanka
Gloves
Wool socks
Underwear
Undershirts
Wool sweaters
Goose down jacket
Shorts
Nylon Pants
Thicker/insulated Pants
No-seeum netting

Shelter:
Tarp/Tarp tent/regular tent
0 deg F Down sleeping bag
Foam insulation pad

Rucksack:
GoLite Pinacle(72 L volume)
Sturdy/military duffel bags if needed

Emergency:
Firesteel
Magnesium bar
Various fish hooks
small sewing kit
Few painkillers, antibiotics, neosporin, epi-pen, wound dressings, etc.
SPOT emergency beacon with a few extra batteries

Footwear:
Boots(Maybe Leather including soles?)
Snowshoes(can't choose a specific one)

Weapons(unsure):
.22 lr pistol or rifle w/ 100 rds.
bow and arrow

Feel free to tell me if I am missing some items, suggest specific manufactures or models for an item, suggest I have too many items and that it will not be feasible to lug all these items around. The longevity of the waterstones, knives, footwear, and clothes are of great concern to me, any suggestions as to increase their life through specific maintenance or if you can suggest an expected lifetime would be greatly appreciated. If anyone can point me to specific locations that would also be a great help as well.

Hopefully this will be a resource to many :D: (I know a similar thread is a sticky but that really just an emergency survival kit) Thanks
 

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I don't see a saw.. or at least a good one.. or sharpening tools..

and why not a box of 525 rounds of .22 might as well have a few extra..


Personally I would like to have.. Axe.. Saw... traping gear (traps can catch food while you do other things) Going off and huning all the time can be a pain.. and if you get sick and your allone it can mean death so bring food and supplies..
 

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You are going to one of those states without fishing gear?:rolleyes:

I would make sure your .22 is high quality, stainless and lots of ammo.

Look into some chest waders or good hip boots.

Stay out of cabins around here. Ain't none of them abandoned and the owners might use you to fertilize their grow operation. One exception might be the NFS cabins in Southeast and a few other places but that might get you a federal beef as they check them routinely. Southeast would be my destination.

Don't forget healthy amount of bug juice, mosquito coils and a really good raincoat.
 

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Numquam Succumbe
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Weightless items that I've found indispensable while building up to your same goals:

Cloth handkerchiefs
Plastic bags
Stainless Steel bowl

Other than that, All I'd say is that you're just ****ing dumb to go try and live a while in the wilderness without memorizing the local flora AND fauna. :thumb:
 

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Would implore you not to run off into the bush with a bowie knife and a can of spam.

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Try living 3 months 'out there' first. See if it's doable for you.

If it is, then here's my recommendation:

Go out asap on a scouting trip, find a suitable location that fits all your criteria, and bring a big sack of seeds with you. Make a food garden, plant some short term food (ground food like tubers, roots, etc) and some long term food (fruit trees, vines, etc). Make sure to protect the plot from critters.

That way if you head out there for real in a year or two, you'll have something already growing and edible to help support you.

Other than that, here's a list of things you'll need ** WiLL TAKE AFEW TRIPS BUT ITS WORTH IT **:

Water
- Metal kettle.
- Emergency backup water filter (Katadyn Pocket filter comes to mind)
- Sturdy water bottle (Nalgene 1L)

Food
- Fishing line and tackle. Lots of it.
- Snare wire. Brass. Lots of it.
- Big sack of seeds, plant asap.
- metal pot
- metal fry pan (i have a cast iron one, its fantastic)

Clothing
- Sturdy clothing
- Good boots
- GI poncho

Fire
- A few firesteels. use for emergencies, use more primitive methods first.
- Magnifying glass. keep it protected in a case.

Shelter & Tools
- 1 Machete
- 2 Large fixed blade knives
- 3 Small fixed blade knives
- 2 good bow saws
- 1 Sturdy axe, wood handle (so you can replace it)
- 1 Handy sized hatchet, wood handle
- Sharpening kit

- 550 Paracord, 1000ft at least, for emergencies

- Potbelly stove (cart it out there, it's worth it)
- Big thick tarp.
- Box of screws, dedicated screwdriver (no multitools)

- Big wall map (laminated), small pocket map (waterproofed), and compass.

Gun: .22 <insert type and brand here>, 10 000 rounds & maintenance kit

- First aid stuff, would research more about this for long term first aid supplies, and stock enough.

- Gardening book, edible plants book, survival book

======

Some of this stuff is unnecessary, but it's not a lot and most is just redundancies.
 

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There is a posting on this or another site that talked about a man going to his grandfather's trapping cabin. The first year he underestimated the amount of everything he would need and barely made it through the first year. The second year, it appeared that he took 4 or 5 times as much food and equipment than he did the first year and he managed well the second year.
 

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IF going into bear country, I'd HIGHLY recommend a good 12GA pump with 1.25-oz Brenneke slugs. It would sure beat the alternative of shoving a .22 into Mr. Bear's ear. A case of #6 bird shot would be nice as well.

Only 100 rds. of .22?

A bow saw will beat the heck out of a machete/saw any day of the week as well.

I'd also add some 10-12lb. fishing line, hooks and sinkers, too.

Oh, yeah: DUCT TAPE!
 

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I would recommend some kind of extender for making fire. (cotton with petroleum works great and is cheap) If you ever get in a situation where its raining etc. you'll wish you had it.
 

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I would suggest a different bag. Golite bags are great bags for hiking and short backpacking trips. While they are tough for their weight to strength ratio, they are not made for what you are wanting to do. I would suggest maybe a rucksack or heavy canvas. Yeah it will be heavier but last a WHOLE lot longer. It would suck to get out there and the bottom of your bag wall out. Good luck.
 

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Jedi Prepper
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How about a rope, so you can hang your self, after your get seriously injured. Just like the rest of the people who are going to live in the wild and write up these ridiculous threads. Do some research you wont have a computer and other people out there to give you "hints". Hike your own hike.

Adam Throop
 

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The rock and roll clown
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A shovel so you can dig a proper latrine.

After a month or two every large rock or tree within 100 yards will have been "used."
 

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I have seen this a few times...

I'll speak for the scenario in Wyo. and Western MT

1. How do you plan to find a cabin in the wilderness abandoned? They are owned by the forest service.
2. When the winter sets in how do you plan to sustain your self? The snow will be deep.
3. Have you ever spent a winter there? If not see #2
3. You need equine to do it right in the west. I have news for you. You won't find a cabin anywhere that has a meadow big enough to keep em close by and sustain them for the winter. Let alone, you need to know how to shoe them, doctor them, even basic care will be a challenge for you, let alone a saddle horse or string of mules.

I find it quite laughable these greenhorns romanticize about heading west and going it alone without even being there for anytime. Hell even a summer thunderstorm at altitude can cause hypothermia.

Those hills are hard, and rough, there is no mercy, mother nature is an unforgiving bitch and could give a **** about you and your milk stained lips. 1 mistake gets you dead.

You better do **** ton more research. Your romantic views are gonna get you killed or worse.
 

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Immortal
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Keep that SPOT emergency beacon on your person at ALL times. Like ALL times.

I know that you don't want to hear this but you don't have the experience to do this and you are going to need to call for help or they will find your body in the spring.

You have not included any food in your supplies.

I like your idea, but go practice for a summer before trying it in the fall or winter. Be prepared to call it quits while you can still walk out if you need to.

Pack a LOT of medical supplies not "a few". Plan for the worst case scenario.

Forget the bow and arrow and 22. Plan to use fishing gear, nets, snares, and a shotgun with a LOT of shells - like hundreds not dozens.
 

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wolf in sheeps clothing
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I agree with groovymike on the nets and snares but I'm not a fan of shotguns and heavy shells, shotguns are better for poor shots but if you can shoot a .22 is fine. Slugs for large animal defense is another story though. I'd recommend bringing a phone with internet, a crank charger, a credit card, and then don't go out any farther than businesses deliver.:)
 

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Please dont assume that you will be able to feed yourself. Carry all the food you will need to survive, then try and live off the land. There is so no harm in trying, just make sure you have backup in case you fail.
I would recommend the granfors bruks scandinavian forest axe. Big enough to fill your stash of firewood in the winter but still small enough to carry on your ruck. A saw will get dull, and you will be unable to resharpen it in the woods. Axes are easy as pie to sharpen it up, you could use a river rock if you had to.
If you cant find a log cabin, just remember that you with an extremely sturdy debris hut and a wood stove installed(you could make it out of rocks if you had too), it would be possible to survive a winter. (mabeye not in the high mountains though....idk)

Carry ALOT of steel traps, and ALOT of nets. You will need those things to keep you fed!
 

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Seriously.. a debris hut..for the winter? omg.. where do you people come from ? Do you realize the amount of wood he'll burn. The primary wood is lodgepole pine it burns fast and not real hot... He'll need to spend a few hours day cutting and splitting. I'm not sure if you've ever run a misery whip or tried to fell a sizable tree to cut for firewood on not. With a chainsaw and a maul it's a good work out.

Now the nice thing about the wilderness is that... you can't have any mechanical things in there. That means hand saws and axe's only. It' a bitch but hey it's the wilderness.

Oh this small little detail you've left out of your research. Out West, to set foot in the wilderness you need a licensed guide, outfitter or resident from that state. Unless you are a resident of that state. Kinda thinking you are not.
 
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Seriously.. a debris hut..for the winter? omg.. where do you people come from ? Do you realize the amount of wood he'll burn. The primary wood is lodgepole pine it burns fast and not real hot... He'll need to spend a few hours day cutting and splitting. I'm not sure if you've ever run a misery whip or tried to fell a sizable tree to cut for firewood on not. With a chainsaw and a maul it's a good work out.

Now the nice thing about the wilderness is that... you can't have any mechanical things in there. That means hand saws and axe's only. It' a bitch but hey it's the wilderness.

Oh this small little detail you've left out of your research. Out West, to set foot in the wilderness you need a licensed guide or outfitter from that state. Unless you are a resident of that state. Kinda thinking you are not.

I have never heard of any such thing and I have lived in the western US, to include Alaska, the vast majority of my life. There is no one checking ID's for residency in the Nat'l Forests...
 

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Seriously.. a debris hut..for the winter? omg.. where do you people come from ?
Your probably right, if the OP wants to live in the mountains then that wouldnt be a good idea....but a debris hut is really good for winters in lowland areas, with mild snow and temps in the teens, but in the rocky mountains, hell no!
 
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