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Discussion Starter #1
In a survival situation one may find themselves in the position of having to kill and butcher wild or domestic animals for food. Has anyone given consideration to some of the potential healath hazards associated with this activity.
There are numerous diseases that an be contracted by handling the carcases of infected animals. Such as Rocky Mountian Spotted Fever and Tularemia to name a couple. There are others.
Peter
 

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Well without eating your dead anyway is the way i see it, if you keep your hands free of cuts you should be alright and cook your meat.
 

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Freedom Is Not Free
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Animals are convieniently made out of meat for a reason. Some taste better, some worse. You'd be suprised what you can eat when hungry. Eating crow is not just a phrase. The taste or wild flavor of meat has a lot to do with what an animal feeds on not it's name.
 

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Scarred for life...
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In a survival situation one may find themselves in the position of having to kill and butcher wild or domestic animals for food. Has anyone given consideration to some of the potential healath hazards associated with this activity.
There are numerous diseases that an be contracted by handling the carcases of infected animals. Such as Rocky Mountian Spotted Fever and Tularemia to name a couple. There are others.
Peter


As long as it was you who killed the animal and not some disease I would think that this is a mute point.

Wash your hands when you are done, and make sure not to eat the meat raw and there would be very little chance of any pathogen being transferred from the animal to you.
 

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Just throw in an onion
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I bought a 50# bag of rolled oats and cracked corn to lure animals on to my property so I can hunt them when SHTF. They were under $20.00 each bag at the local feed shop.
 

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Light work gloves, lots of soap & water, and a few weeks of the appropriate antibiotic should help. You don’t need animals to pick up a fatal infection when you do not have access to medical care.
 

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if you been out long enoff and need food and are going to try to be rescuced or found worry about it later as you could be dead if you dont drink that water but a paricity may kill you if you dont get medical attention later.. so its a risk worth takeing sometimes..
 

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AKA The Dragon
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Cooking the meat to the point of overcooking is probably the best way to prevent infection from diseases and parasites.
Some parts of the animal like the tail or hind quarter are sometimes the only part of the animal that is realtively safe.
Same for fish, I have caught reef fish riddled with parasites, sometimes it is not worth the risk.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The Dragon,

Speaking of fish...

Locally there is an murcury/heavy metals advisory on fish caught from certian waters. Pregnant women and children are NOT to consume fish from these waters and healthy adults are advised not to consume more than 8 ounces per week. A direct result of poor mining practices.

Peter
 

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Wide awake
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Many of us have been hunting for years, and have yet to contract any serious diseases. While some animals have been known to carry various viruses and bacteria, the threat of contracting anything is relatively low. I hunt regularly, don't use gloves to clean my kills, and just rinse off. I try to wash when I get home. But in all honesty, soap wasn't mainstream until a few decades ago. Killing and cleaning wild animals to survive was common until fairly recently, and still occurs regularly in some rural areas in the U.S. I have been through a couple of military schools that still teach how to eat raw meat if you have to. It can be done. It isn't preferable, but I would choose it hands down over death. I highly recommend being as hygenic as you can, when you can, but most of the hype over contracting diseases is just that, hype.

Someone said it well a few posts back. If you're the one who killed the animal, and not the ebola virus or something, you're probably O.K. Hope this helps!

"Civilize the mind and make savage the body."
 

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Hitch Hiking Guide
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No offense, but I can almost garuntee you have done little to none hunting/butchering of your own. Sure, there are risks, however, me and my family have been doing our own hunting and butchering since I can remember... and never has anyone in my family had an issue. If we are talking from a realistic standpoint, your chances of contracting something from meat in a supermarket is higher than anywhere else.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
No offense, but I can almost garuntee you have done little to none hunting/butchering of your own.
Sounds that way doesn't it...
Pete
 

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In a survival situation one may find themselves in the position of having to kill and butcher wild or domestic animals for food. Has anyone given consideration to some of the potential healath hazards associated with this activity.
There are numerous diseases that an be contracted by handling the carcases of infected animals. Such as Rocky Mountian Spotted Fever and Tularemia to name a couple. There are others.
Peter

I wouldn't worry too much about this. I butcher over a thousand animals a year and have doing it since the mid '90s. I've yet to get sick from it. Proper hygine is needed, but then it is needed for opening to door at a public restroom too. Some say there are more germs on your keyboard right now than there are inside a toliet. I understand your concern, and it is not incorrect, but it's not the huge danger it is sometimes made out to be.

BLT
 

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Field dressing animals

Unless you have open wounds or drink the blood and you are carful not to cut yourself while skinning or cutting up your prey and you cook it good I can safely say you do not have to worry about diseases from the blood of an animal. Also there are no domestic wild animals. There are pets and then there are wild animals. You cannot tame a wild animal because there is always the chance he will turn and attack you. Ask Zikfred or Roy which ever the ones was who was mauled by a TAME Lion or the Lady on Television who was attacked by the TAME bear.
 

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Mmmm, prey. Forage some wild onions, wild asparagus, maybe some greens for a salad, and call it dinner, I'll be right there!

I've shot and butchered, helped butcher, fished and cleaned, cooked it. I can easily tell you the foods that have made me ill, and the restaurants and grocery stores they came from.
 

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reluctant sinner
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"You want to live forever" I have sad news... In a survival situation its eat it now and maybe die later, or just die now otherwise its not a survival situation. Peanuts have a carcinagen; gamma rays and neutrinos are attacking your DNA as you read this. And while your are learning to process dinner, try and learn to tan the hyde and make use of all you can. Relax almost no one get out of here alive.
 

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Texas Born & Texas Proud
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I am more afraid of dying from eating wild mushrooms than wild meat because I was raised killing, butchering, and preparing wild meat and never picked a mushroom in my life. I do need to learn though.
 
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