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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read a lot of people here talking about using wool blankets for a sleeping system instead of a sleeping bag, I'm just wondering what the reason for that could possibly be. I'd take an army four piece sleeping system over blanket any day. Blankets are less warm, heavier, bigger.
 

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MOLON LABE!
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Wool blankets are warm even when wet, they can be used to make a shelter, they can be fashioned into a cape or a poncho, and a 80/20 wool blanket is lighter and less bulky than a 4 piece sleep system.
This.

Wool sheds water quickly, as well, something about the natural oils makes it a great fabric if you can get past the itch.
 

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Gas! Gas! Gas!
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I guess it is because a wool blanket -as indicated by the above post- is more versatile, while a sleeping bag always remains a sleeping bag (unless permanently modified). Also, there is little that can realistically compare to the insulation qualities of wool... it is supposed to retain over 70% of insulation properties soaking wet (although I've never tested it personally to that degree). Poncho was mentioned... I made one out of a green USGI blanket and used it on very windy and/or sleety days hunting and found it to be excellent at stopping the wind and keeping me warm. I suppose -if weight and bulk weren't an issue- it would be best to have both a wool blanket and a dedicated sleeping bag, but when we have to choose one over another, it would depend on what works best for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Smaller than a sleeping system? Mine only takes up about three quarters of a quick foot, maybe less. Plus the bivvy negates the Need for a tent. When the need for further shelter is considered wouldn't a blanket quickly become not worth it?

Also, down to what temprature could you sleep in them comfortably?

As for being water resistant, the army sleeping systems bivvy again negates the need for such a thing as the gortex is water proof.

Is it a comfort thing? I know some people don't like being wrapped up in a sleeping bag.
 

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Numquam Succumbe
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Versatilty and Durability. That's why I used to carry a wool blanket.

The sleep system is definitely warmer for the weight, though. A wool blanket, even with a bivvy cover MIGHT take you down to 40 degrees comfortably for 5lbs worth of weight. From 70 degrees, that's 6 degrees per pound. The USGI sleep system will take you down to at LEAST -20 degrees (functionally, I know it says -50 on the tag, but that's rated for 4 hours of sleep a night, and **** that!), and from 70 degrees, that's 7.5 degrees per pound. So, you get much more warmth per pound of weight with the sleeping bags.

...But the sleeping bags aren't as versatile, and they're not as durable! :thumb:

Oh! And another thing I personally love about wool, especially for my application, is that when it's dirty, wet, grimey, and greasy, it will still function flawlessly.

Let your synthetic sleeping bag get all wet, dirty, grimey, and greasy and you're ****ed!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Versatilty and Durability. That's why I used to carry a wool blanket.

The sleep system is definitely warmer for the weight, though. A wool blanket, even with a bivvy cover MIGHT take you down to 40 degrees comfortably for 5lbs worth of weight. From 70 degrees, that's 6 degrees per pound. The USGI sleep system will take you down to at LEAST -20 degrees (functionally, I know it says -50 on the tag, but that's rated for 4 hours of sleep a night, and **** that!), and from 70 degrees, that's 7.5 degrees per pound. So, you get much more warmth per pound of weight with the sleeping bags.

...But the sleeping bags aren't as versatile, and they're not as durable! :thumb:

Oh! And another thing I personally love about wool, especially for my application, is that when it's dirty, wet, grimey, and greasy, it will still function flawlessly.

Let your synthetic sleeping bag get all wet, dirty, grimey, and greasy and you're ****ed!
Thank you, that's the kind of answer I was looking for :)

I guess I never considered them because I live in New England, and my bug out is going to New Hampshire. A wool blanket won't more or less be useless to me, in the mountains I'm heading too it gets down to fifty in the summer at night!
 

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Wool blankets are are a solid bet. They are very warm even when wet. I know this from years as a civil war reenactor. We have been rained on lots of times. Like that picture they make good blanket rolls. A good civle war reporduction wool blanket can run over a 100 dollars.
 

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Though I only own one wool blanket, I also own columbia wool pants and jacket. Yesterday it was pouring rain probablly in the 50s I was out hunting for about 5 hours at the end of the outing my clothes were soaked and I was warm. I recommend atleast a set of woolies for any one who lives in cold climates, they are not great at stoping wind but if I ever had to stay the night in the woods they would be a life saver....
 

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my very first sleeping bag as a kid was a wwII wool mummy inside a canvas cover with laces.

in temperate climates with cool-cold nights, it may take more than one (maybe more than 2) wool blanket to keep you warm. advantage sleeping bag.
wool sheds water. most better bags absorb less than 5-10% of their weight in water and dry more quickly. slight advantage to sleeping bag.
wool is quite heavy and does not compress much at all. advantage sleeping bag.

i use wool as an adjunct to my sleeping bags. base camp, nothing like an extra blanket either inside or over my bag on really cold nights. in just cool weather, just the blanket with a water repellant cover/bivy does fine.
bottom line is both wool blankets and synthetic bags have roles they fulfill in my camp
 

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I would carry both, but that is because while I am fine with the outside temp at 130 deg, when it dips below 60 I don't like it.
 

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Thank you, that's the kind of answer I was looking for :)

I guess I never considered them because I live in New England, and my bug out is going to New Hampshire. A wool blanket won't more or less be useless to me, in the mountains I'm heading too it gets down to fifty in the summer at night!
50s at night in the White Mtns for maybe 5 months a year.
http://www.go-newhampshire.com/White-Mountains-New-Hampshire/Weather/

Be prepared for a Northern NE BoL....

We've got wool blankets in all of our vehicles, and 3-day bags. Wool; natural material that's been used successfully for 1000's of years. Can't beat it :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
50s at night in the White Mtns for maybe 5 months a year.
http://www.go-newhampshire.com/White-Mountains-New-Hampshire/Weather/

Be prepared for a Northern NE BoL....

We've got wool blankets in all of our vehicles, and 3-day bags. Wool; natural material that's been used successfully for 1000's of years. Can't beat it :)
That link shows temprature for North Conway, a town at the base of the mountains. Very different weather from the mountains themselves.

I've been hiking those mountains for eleven years, I can tell you not only are they cold at night, but very windy.
 
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