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Vincer Aut Mori
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok ive been here a little while and it seems like everyone (or a lot of you ) like to put a lot of dry beans in buckets i know that they store well and have a lot of protein but im wondering how many of you could actually eat them everyday before goin absolute nuts and start knawing at your own foot.my question is are there not other things that you can buy that can be stored for along period of time that have a little more flavor.I mean shoot how many beans can one person actually eat??:cool:
 

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Who is John Galt?
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I guess I would have to see if I would rather eat these beans or starve to death. Seriously though that is where you need to research and find recipes for cooking with beans, plus added with rice that give you the nutrition you need to stay healthy and they are a great filler food if you have a limited amount of meat it can sure stretch a meal. Spices spices spices will help with taste bud exhaustion. Also do a search for sprouting. Ever since I read up on this I started doubling the amount of beans I am storing. I have sprouted a few and although I must admit they take some getting use to having fresh greens in the winter with little effort will definitely be a plus, and so nutritious I have been trying to adjust my tongue to them and eat them all the time.
Good question though.
 

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Hmmm, should I have more beans or starve to death...

How many beans can one person eat? I'd say enough to keep alive. Best of luck with being a finicky eater after an event.
With enough people you should be able to run a "natural gas" generator of some sorts! :upsidedown:

Beans are the one prep I struggle with. You have to soak em overnight, and when it comes to meals I hate having to play 8 hours in advance. Along with the long cook time of even soaked beans, I find that I'm in an area short of fuel in a SHTF situation. I'm saving up for a good pressure cooker just to insure that my beans get used after SHTF.

So far the only thing I can do is to soak em over night, then slow cook em in a crock pot with other stuff.
 

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With enough people you should be able to run a "natural gas" generator of some sorts! :upsidedown:

Beans are the one prep I struggle with. You have to soak em overnight, and when it comes to meals I hate having to play 8 hours in advance. Along with the long cook time of even soaked beans, I find that I'm in an area short of fuel in a SHTF situation. I'm saving up for a good pressure cooker just to insure that my beans get used after SHTF.

So far the only thing I can do is to soak em over night, then slow cook em in a crock pot with other stuff.
If you throw out your soak water, it reduces the amount of gas from beans. Water the garden with the soak water...the garden loves it!

Lentils and split green peas, also some of the smaller beans, cook in much less time. Soak them overnight, bring them to a boil, and turn the heat off. This will shorten the time when you actually cook them to about an hour. You can also bring them to a boil and put them in a wide-mouth thermos overnight to continue to cook. A Dutch oven or solar oven could also be used for much less fuel to cook. I save mainly smaller beans and split peas except for those I sprout for a stir fry or such.

Remember, beans are also seeds and can be planted. What you eat is the dried stage of the beans, but you can eat them the same way you do green beans up to that point.

Beans are just the start, a raw material like rice or wheat...the seasoning is what makes or breaks it. Try Boston baked beans with molasses, or bean soup and corn bread on a cold winter night, fried bean cakes, mixed in as a filler for meatloaf, or refried beans in Mexican food with tortillas. Like rice, they can make so many recipes that you wouldn't know you are eating them that much. You can even make a "sausage" from them that tastes like sausage and has the texture of sausage! Here's the recipe for that: http://www.homeprepping.com/forums/showthread.php/16-Bean-Recipes
 

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I store lentils because they are good. If you think gnawing off your own foot is better, you're cooking them wrong! :eek: Prepper cooking is often from scratch cooking. There are some good cookbooks on cooking with beans or rice. Check on Amazon, or if you're broke, go to the library and check out a bunch of cookbooks for free. You can always try out a few recipes that sound good and copy your favorites.

People buy lentils because they are very small, and the smaller something is, the quicker it cooks. Also, lentils don't have to be pre-soaked before cooking (although you can), so they are a lot less hassle. Lentils come in a lot of different colors and textures - black, green, brown, red (really, they're orange), so you feel like you are getting some variety. If you cook lentils or very small beans, dice the other ingredients, or slice them thin, so it all cooks at about the same rate.

NV Prepper's "Red Lentils and The Kitchen Sink"

Basic recipe:
1 cup red lentils
3-4 carrots, diced
3-4 celery stalks, diced
1 yellow or white onion, diced
1/2 lb summer sausage, diced
2 cans chicken broth
2 tbsp olive oil

Optional:
2-3 diced red or gold Yukon potatoes
3 cloves garlic
handful split peas, green or yellow
1 can red beans, rinsed
1 can stewed tomatoes
2 small cans tomato paste
1/2 - 1 diced bell pepper, any color.
handful of spinach

Spices:
1/2 tsp ginger, 1/2 tsp majoram, 1/2 tsp turmeric, (together) with or without 1 tsp curry OR

1 tsp chili powder and 1 tsp cumin OR

1 can diced chilies, with or without:
1 tsp white (milder) pepper or black pepper, or to taste
salt to taste (don't use it myself, use spicy stuff instead)

In a large wok, add olive oil. Add onions, carrots, celery, summer sausage, garlic and potatoes if you use them. Cook everything until the onions look soft. Add everything else. Add all but about 1/2 can of the chicken broth. Disolve spices in remaining chicken broth, then add. Add water until it's all about covered. The fluid will cook down. Cook 30-45 minutes. Serve with Louisiana hot sauce or Mexican hot sauce, if it's not spicy already.

You can leave out about 2/3 of the above, and it will still turn out fine. The main ingredients are lentils, summer sausage, onions, and carrots and celery, with something spicy, like diced chilies, chili powder, or whatever you like, or you can serve it with Mexican hot sauce. Just use whatever you have.

NV Prepper's Mom's Brown Lentil Stew

1 cup brown lentils
1 can stewed tomatoes
2 cans tomato sauce
3 cans tomato paste
pork ends, ham leftovers, sausage, whatever you have
3 diced celery
3 diced carrot
1 diced yellow onion
Salt and Pepper to taste. Usually the salt in the ham will flavor it, so use a light hand on the salt, if at all.

NV Prepper's Red Beans and Rice, Rice Cooker Style

1 1/2 rice cooker measures of white rice, rinsed
1 yellow onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, diced finely
3-4 ribs celery, diced
2 cans low salt or no salt red beans, drained and rinsed
1/3 lb summer sausage, diced
1 can low sodium beef broth
1 tsp Lea & Perrin Worcestershire sauce
2 bay leaves

Pour rice in the bottom of the rice cooker.
Next, layer in the following order:
onion, celery, red beans, sausage, bay leaves. Pour beef broth over all. Press "cook."
Serve with Lousiana hot sauce or Mexican bottled hot sauce.

Check out the lentil and bean recipes at the fluwikie web site archive. There are probably hundreds by now. There's another site called fooddownunder with a lot of recipes from around the world. Also try allrecipes.com. You can put in "red beans" or "lentils" and a ton of recipes will come up.

Also, consider "hoppin' John" recipes (black eyed peas to you), Cuban black beans recipes, and red beans and rice recipes. There are a lot of ethnic groups that use beans and rice, or beans and pasta, as an ethnic food. Be aware black beans, black lentils and black rice tend to dye everything else in the dish, so be careful what you put in there or it will look like something the Adams family would have for dinner.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Well, if you're eating the same foods day in and day out, yeah you're probably going to experience appetite fatigue, which in more serious cases can cause people to stop eating, or eat too little to stay healthy.

The secret is variety and versatility. Don't store beans and rice only. And don't only store one type of beans and one type of rice. Store a lot of other foods and spices.

But most importantly is LEARN TO COOK! I've seen several reports over the years that said the average person only ever rotates through a dozen or so recipes. That's just sad! Cooking is one of life's most basic skills. There are cultures all throughout the world that use some form of grain (store more than just rice!) and bean as their staple.

The grain doesn't have to be rice. In fact, whole wheat is by far more nutritious and versatile. You can make all sorts of simple flat breads and tortillas with it, breakfast cereal, pastas, gravies and sauces. You can sprout it for healthy greens and you can even plant it to grow more wheat. Plain old popcorn that you can buy cheaply in 50 lb buckets or bags makes the best tasting corn meal and grits you've ever eaten. There's barley, oats, etc.

Anytime you combine a legume (beans or peanuts) with a grain, the complementary amino acids form the basis for complete proteins. This is why beans and grains are so popular. It's a more affordable way to put up protein and calories than meat. So, looking at it that way, take a look at some of the combinations just off the top of my head.

Beans and tortillas made into burritos, frijoles and spanish rice, Italian bean soup and risotto, pita bread and hummus (garbanzo bean dip), Indian dahl (spicy lentils) and rice pilaf, Cajun red beans and rice, chili beans or split pea soup with corn bread. Tofu (made from soybeans) and rice are staples in a lot of Asian dishes.

All you need are some basic spices, some recipes and some practice. Then when you factor in a good variety of veggies and some basic techniques in pickling and fermenting you can make awesome Korean food right down to the homemade kimchee. Or food from just about anywhere else in the world. There's no reason to ever get tired of eating the same thing. The world is full of amazing flavors and food combinations all using most of the same staples. You could eat the same basic foods day in and day out and never have the same meal twice if you don't want to.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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With enough people you should be able to run a "natural gas" generator of some sorts! :upsidedown:

Beans are the one prep I struggle with. You have to soak em overnight, and when it comes to meals I hate having to play 8 hours in advance. Along with the long cook time of even soaked beans, I find that I'm in an area short of fuel in a SHTF situation. I'm saving up for a good pressure cooker just to insure that my beans get used after SHTF.

So far the only thing I can do is to soak em over night, then slow cook em in a crock pot with other stuff.
Soaking is a pain but it does help reduce cooking time. I normally don't soak my beans now that times are good. But I'll have to when fuel is more limited. But meal planning isn't as important now as it will be then either. We'll need to carefully plan our meals to deal with any possible leftovers and to be able to make up things in advance for the next meal, etc. So planning soaking time won't be as big of a deal then as it is now.

There's a lot of way of reducing fuel use when it comes to cooking beans. A pressure cooker is one of them. Retained heat cooking is even better. It takes a bit longer than straight pressure cooking, but it gets the pot off the fire almost as soon as it reaches pressure. You can either make or buy an insulated pot cozy. When it reaches pressure, you set it in the cozy to continue cooking with the retained heat. As you might imagine, it has to be very well insulated against heat loss. Google "hay box" or "retained heat cooking"

Heck, you can even cook beans in a thermos by retained heat, though it works better with faster cooking things like split peas, lentils, grains, etc.
 

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Simple answer, don't store just one kind of bean, or anything for that matter.
I have hard red wheat, hard white wheat, and soft white wheat.
Lentils, white beans, black turtle beans, pinto beans, and split peas.
Bismati rice, white long grain rice, and white short grain rice.
Barley, rye, buckwheat, oat groats, quick oats, and whole yellow corn.
If I could find a source for dark red kidney beans at a reasonable price I would have them too. Right now, I have seeds to plant kidney beans in my garden next year.
 

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I just got a good tip from my old man: Toss in some roadkill!

Seriously though, I appreciate the good ideas. I like the wide mouth thermos idea, hands free cooking could be a boon when SHTF.
 

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Simple answer, don't store just one kind of bean, or anything for that matter.
I have hard red wheat, hard white wheat, and soft white wheat.
Lentils, white beans, black turtle beans, pinto beans, and split peas.
Bismati rice, white long grain rice, and white short grain rice.
Barley, rye, buckwheat, oat groats, quick oats, and whole yellow corn.
If I could find a source for dark red kidney beans at a reasonable price I would have them too. Right now, I have seeds to plant kidney beans in my garden next year.
I could be wrong, but I heard they have to boil kidney beans once to be able to sell them. Something about them being indigestible or even slightly poisonous. Could be the reason for the inflated price.
 

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I store beans because they're cheap and will last for 30 years. As of now im having a hard time spending the money on something like 10# mountain house foods. I guess i could spend my vacation money on it but whats the good of life if you never have any fun :)
 

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Vincer Aut Mori
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
dont get me wrong i like beans and trust me I know how to cook them i just was wondering why it is that yall like to store so many? i mean it seems like there are a lot of people on here that im sure have probably 10 5 gal buckets full of beans and rice.i guess what im curious about is there not a more palitable food that can be preped for as long as beans and ric?just to let yall know thats pretty much what we lived off of when i was groin up pinto beans, fried taters, corn bread.trust me ive ate my fair share of themand know how to cook a hell of a pot of beans it just seeems like that it would be difficult to eat them for a yearyou know what i mean?:cool:
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I just got a good tip from my old man: Toss in some roadkill!

Seriously though, I appreciate the good ideas. I like the wide mouth thermos idea, hands free cooking could be a boon when SHTF.
You actually can't use the widemouth very well. They don't hold heat well enough. The one that works best for me is the Stanley Aladdin. I know there are probably more efficient models out there now, with advances in technology and all, but I started using the Aladdin about 20 years ago. It's unbreakable, so I've just stuck with it.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I could be wrong, but I heard they have to boil kidney beans once to be able to sell them. Something about them being indigestible or even slightly poisonous. Could be the reason for the inflated price.
All beans need to be cooked before eating. There's some enzyme in them or something that blocks nutrient absorbtion and is toxic. I haven't heard that about kidney beans, but I do know that they have an extremely high level of that enzyme. Even bean sprouts need to be cooked. Some beans like mung beans have less of the enzyme and it's not as important, while others like the kidney bean are often recommended not to use for sprouts, even when cooked.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I store beans because they're cheap and will last for 30 years. As of now im having a hard time spending the money on something like 10# mountain house foods. I guess i could spend my vacation money on it but whats the good of life if you never have any fun :)
No great loss on the Mountain House anyway. That stuff is really expensive to try and get enough calories from and loaded with sodium. So it really only makes sense to have a little around for times you need a quick meal or need to keep scent discipline.
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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My wife makes some killer soups with beans, all sorts of beans. It's all in the spices and recipes.

Which means, of course, that you need to be sure you're stocking enough spices and the like so as to bring variety to your meals.

You can buy dehydrated garlic, dehydrated onion--and I've packed them in mylar w/ O2 absorbers. I've put up peppercorns, cayenne pepper, oregano, buillion cubes. I'll be looking for more.
 
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RESET CONGRESS!!
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Ask my grandparents and parents about beans and rice.
Ask Asians about beans and rice.
.... lentils,... delicious.
 
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