Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 90 Posts

·
Customized Member
Joined
·
529 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Red Cross recommends:
Water – one gallon per person per day; Food—non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home)

Ok, so maybe you want to stretch it out a little further just to feel extra prepared...maybe 3 months worth of food. But, WHY in the WORLD would you need to store food for an entire year??? That's just crazy!

This question was just asked to me by my husband who isn't really on board. He's fine with the basics...but when I start packing stuff in mylar for long term he thinks it's unnecessary I guess...if not weird. I mentioned safety, possible job loss, sickness, inflation...even did the whole insurance comparison.

Are there any sites you can check to see (for example) what a pound of pasta was in 2000 and what it is today? Maybe approach it from an investment standpoint?

Does anyone know of some articles I could show him on the practicality of long term storage?

And please, I'm really at my wits end over this so don't dump a lot of smart arse remarks on me. I'm asking for genuine feedback on this particular question. Thanks guys.
 

·
The Maker
Joined
·
1,679 Posts
I do it for two reasons.
1. so my family can eat for a year if we have to. (tell him to research the great depression, those people wished they had a years food)
2. i have a group of people that know im prepared. so. if i end up with 9 people instead of three i still have 3 to six months worth of food for the entire party (not including what my mates bring)


plus, buying in bulk is always easier on the pocket book in the long run.
 

·
I help enlighten folks
Joined
·
16,624 Posts
if you sleep better at night for doing it, what's the harm?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
There are more reasons than I could list, but here are a few as relates to a disaster:

I'm going to get sick of certain foods, so adding other types of foods will help me get by. I might end up discarding or giving away the other 9 months of food.

Some of that food may go bad. Selecting and storing food for long term storage is a learning process.

Some of that food may get destroyed during the initial event.

Some of that food may be given to friends, relatives and neighbors that didn't plan for themselves.

Some of that food may be used to barter for other equipment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
I am putting away 1 years worth of food for up to 30 people. Here is why.

1) I've figured the cost for 2200 calories per person per day for a year can be bought for under $600. Yes that is $600 for a YEAR. And that includes more than just rice too in case you were wondering.

2) Our system is ridiculously delicate. Right now we are classified as a 1st world country. There are millions of people who feel entitled. I personally believe that when TSHTF, the USA will slip (Perhaps permanently) into 3rd world status. When that happens, it will take well over a year for the dust to settle.

3) If something big and bad (Or at this point even something small pushes us over the edge) at the WRONG time (IE anytime between December and April) the country could easily be out of food for up to 8 months just by the nature of the planting season.

4) The World Food Bank has been saying for some time that world wide stores of food are shrinking. In the long term, this must drive prices of the basics up. I'd rather pay today's prices and have it last for 30 years than wait around and purchase half the amount for the same price.

5) Even if you are just getting yourself ready, who knows who would show up on your doorstop in a crisis. I'd rather have extra then not enough if for no other reason then trade.

6) There is ZERO reason not to over prep. The cost is minimal. The guaranteed benefit even if nothing EVER happens, is apparent. And the possible benefits are priceless.

Just off the top of my head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,561 Posts
I like food do you have a problem with that?

WHAT!.....Are you the food police some kind of food Nazi is that what your about?
why you be hating on the food !:D::D::D::D::rolleyes:
 

·
Keeping it Simple
Joined
·
1,074 Posts
I try to plan for worst case scenario and prep to those ends. A years worth of food should get you through a growing season if all your gardens are destroyed.

Worse case something happens just before harvesting time and all is lost. Now you cant plant until the next spring and harvested a few months after that. So a years food is the LEAST amount that should be stored. I think 2 years should be the target and also planning on extra because thats what WE at this site do.

Two is One and One is None (then double that and throw in a few extras) Have 3 or 4 ways to do the same task and back them all up with extras and spare parts.
 

·
Armchair Prepper
Joined
·
533 Posts
You've got a lot of reasons to prep a year's worth of food. The only reason he needs from you is that you want to do it. It's your hobby, and you enjoy doing it.

Does he watch sports? Complete waste of time. Agree that you won't prep food for a year if he quits watching sports for a year.

Does he enjoy the occasional beer? Hunt? Fish? Work with wood? IF he's got a hobby, it probably costs more than your prep hobby. Agree that you won't prep food for a year if he quits _his_ hobby for a year.

Does he drive to work? It probably makes more sense to take public transportation. It's probably healthier to ride a bike.

People do things for a lot of reasons. You want to prep? Prep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
From your husband's point of view:

If a friend or relative loses their job or undergoes financial hardship, you can help them out. This actually happened in my family recently - a relative's husband left her with the mortgage payment, she lost her job, and went from a very good living to zero income in a short time. Her next job, months later, was $10 an hour. She lost her house. By that time, she was going to church food pantries to eat. I was able to help her until she got another job.

If you or your husband lose their job, this will help buy you time to figure out what to do next, and hopefully get another job without having to go into too much debt.

Food is getting more expensive all the time. Hedge against inflation.
 

·
Misfit Toy
Joined
·
2,185 Posts
In all honesty, it may become a hard sell, for you. My wife is the same way. Even with all that's going on around the world, she still thinks we're far detatched from any probability of a food shortage, or worse.

Obviously you have valid concerns, or you wouldn't have found this forum. Convincing your spouse those concerns are anything more than fear-based, paranioa....may be very difficult.

You could take the time to sit down and seriously discuss the matter with him. Bring up various reasons to have that little extra advantage or insurance, in the event the economy got worse, or transportation slowed down due to the expense or shortages of oil.

I've simply exhausted all attempts to reach my spouse. And in doing that, took on the role of trying to prepare as best I could without her knowing.

I've gotten tons of water containers from my workplace (canola oil comes in 5 & 7 gallon commercial plastic containers) washed them out, sanitized them, and stored them.

I buy extra can food everytime I go out. And usually 2-3 pounds of bulk dried pinto beans. Big bag of basmati rice. You get the picture.

It makes good sense to set your food preps at one year or more so that you might have enough food on hand in the event of a shortage, or to try and raise a small garden to supplement your stores.

Ultimately, if you try to reach him, and get the *she's lost her effin mind look* just toss a little extra in the cart when you go. Be creative. Find a way to stock up without causing a lot of conflict within your family.

But do continue to stock....it's just good sense. Food prices aren't going down. Food banks save you money on down the line, even if nothing does ever happen.
 

·
I see a bad moon arising
Joined
·
1,267 Posts
Anything much less than a year's worth of stored food, and all you're doing
is marking time until the inevitable end of your supplies in a long term crisis.

With a year's worth of food, you at least got a shot at getting through
an entire growing season to replenish your supplies.

Two years of supplies would be better, and give you a buffer against a
bad harvest and/or steep learning curve if you're just starting out with
your gardening skills.

But of course, storing up one or two years of food is not a practical solution
for everyone, either for economic reasons, or just a limited amount of
storage space.

I'd say less than 1 year of food is short-term crisis thinking. "I've got enough
to get me through some rough times, but things will get better, and the
'system' that allows me to buy food will be restored.
" This is of course
your most likely scenario. Someone in another post made an excellent
point that Japan has been hit with a monster earthquake, a tsunami, and
a massive nuclear crisis all back to back. Any one of which would qualify
for that "SHTF" event that we're all prepping for in some way shape or form.
And yet, despite not one, but three serious events, the "system" is still
running. The government is still in place, and there's no hordes of mutant
zombie bikers ravashing the radioative ruins of the landscape. Japan will
recover and rebuild. It's not on the brink of slipping into the dark
ages. So perhaps -- at least in the long term -- the "system" isn't as
fragile as we sometimes believe it to be. (My apologies to the original poster
of that statement for my plagerism. I just thought it was such a well
thought out observation that it bore repeating.)

One year or more of storage gets you into that long-term crisis thinking.
"If they 'system' breaks down, it's going to stay broke for a long, long time.
I need some supplies to get me through until I can figure out how to provide
my food supplies for myself indefinitely
." Obviously FAR less likely of an
occurance, but if it does happen, and you didn't prep enough food to carry
you through, then its just a matter of weeks or months until your limited
supplies run out and you join the starving masses who didn't prep at all.

Start with storing up some short term food supplies. Three days is better
than nothing. Two weeks will see you through a lot more than three days.
Several months? -- Even better. At some point you'll finally say "enough is
enough." Your call as to what that point is.

Personally, I've just recently gotten my supplies to right at one year.
And I'm done. Wish I could store some more, but in my case, I'm out of room.
However, we have a small garden that should help extend that time frame,
and I've invested considerable research into edible native food sources,
which would also help considerably. Untested, but I would hope to be able
to stretch my supplies out to two years or so before things got really scary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,019 Posts
If stored properly you have very little to lose (packing costs?). If nothing bad happens, you can still use the food, so you're not really wasting money. If something bad does happen, then it's priceless, and well worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
694 Posts
www.asamom.com did a food price survey that started last fall sometime when Glenn Beck did his big show on food storage. You could at least compare prices from October or November, whenever it was. I'm sorry I don't have any better answers for you, but at least know that I am in the same boat with regards to my husband as you are. One of these days he's going to thank you. Just keep plugging away. That's what I do.
I hate thinking that my husband whom I have known for 22 years now would think that all of a sudden I've lost all sense of good judgement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Obviously, your husband got a C- in history.

Throughout history mankind has faced MANY famines, diseases, wars, catastrophes, etc... that destroyed the food chain.

Those cultures that stored food for hard times survived.

Those that didn't often perished.

We now have a more complex global food chain. One missing link could force famine on a major portion of the planet.

One missing link in the supply chain could interrupt delivery of basic staples.

Now, add to this the number of countries already suffering famines.

Now add a scary reality... we lost 40 million plus to the flu epidemic back at the turn of the century. It's statistically a miracle that we haven't experienced a much worse viral threat. (I worked on both the SARS outbreak and containing Avian flu. WHO has 20+ more diseases in the pipline that if they go global... we are toast. This doesn't include a new mutation.) (The last scientist I spoke with on the subject said "On any given day a virus can mutate and within 72 hours wipe out 80% of the human population.") Massive death due to disease means massive interruption in the food supply chain. We already have entire nations that cannot and do not produce enough food to feed their countries.

One year's food storage is a fool's move. 5-10 years is more prudent. This is simply based on the statistical reality of history.

One meteor could give us three years of winter. Is your husband stocked up to survive even one simple disaster.

I've been in evacuation shelters where 2,000 people were sleeping on the floor on blankets... and we couldn't get food in fast enough to just handle 2,000 in an emergency. What happens when the whole country gets hit hard... not just a small region?

BTW... where have the honey bees gone? Are they important?
 

·
I help enlighten folks
Joined
·
16,624 Posts
Obviously, your husband got a C- in history.

Throughout history mankind has faced MANY famines, diseases, wars, catastrophes, etc... that destroyed the food chain.
Rome fell TOO ya know
 
1 - 20 of 90 Posts
Top