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Question: While one can buy bulk beans cheaper, I may also start buying five or so pounds of beans each time I go to the grocery store (which would be about fifteen pounds a week). These would be in 1 or 2 pound bags, generally. Eventually, I'd have enough to fill a pail. From what I've read here, one should remove them from the original plastic packages when placing them in a five gallon bucket.

What is the reason why? Is it trapped air in the bags? Trapped moisture? Something else?
 

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From what I understand, over long term the packaging will break down and the toxins of the plastics will leech into the food. The original packaging isn't made for LTS. I may be off by a bit but thats the general ideal. Even when you buy food grade buckets for LTS its highly recommended if not the standard to use oxygen absorbers and a mylar bag as a liner in the bucket.
 

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From what I understand, over long term the packaging will break down and the toxins of the plastics will leech into the food. The original packaging isn't made for LTS. I may be off by a bit but thats the general ideal. Even when you buy food grade buckets for LTS its highly recommended if not the standard to use oxygen absorbers and a mylar bag as a liner in the bucket.
useing maylar bags is just for extra protection incase your bucket isnt air tight like you think (leek), i really dont think plastic will break down,specially being kept in a cool dry place, even if it is out in the elements,most plactic will last for centries.

why do you think ppl put stuff in zip lock baggies or food saver bags for long term. i could be wrong, but as long as it is food grade plastic is should be fine.

as long as you freeze your beans for 2-3 days to kill any bugs that may be in the bag. i think it will be ok
 

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useing maylar bags is just for extra protection incase your bucket isnt air tight like you think (leek), i really dont think plastic will break down,specially being kept in a cool dry place, even if it is out in the elements,most plactic will last for centries.

why do you think ppl put stuff in zip lock baggies or food saver bags for long term. i could be wrong, but as long as it is food grade plastic is should be fine.

as long as you freeze your beans for 2-3 days to kill any bugs that may be in the bag. i think it will be ok
I'm no expert, but i tend to agree. I also think we may be using this stuff sooner rather than later, so it may not matter.
 

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Few days ago I was going through some of the cabinets in the kitchen and found a box of pintos that I bought back in '99 getting ready for Y2K. I didn't really expect it to be there to tell the truth but since I found it I cooked some of them for that days meal. Even after about 3 hours of cooking they were still hard and practically unedible. My conclusion was that if a package isn't airtight then the shelf life is probably under 5 years at best. I just left them in the hot pan overnight and eventually they softened up but still were nowhere near where they should 've been taste wise if stored properly.
 

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I have had the same question in my mind too....I think you guys have explained it well enough to me that it makes more sense......and I can explain it to the Mrs.....
 

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From what I understand, over long term the packaging will break down and the toxins of the plastics will leech into the food. The original packaging isn't made for LTS. I may be off by a bit but thats the general ideal. Even when you buy food grade buckets for LTS its highly recommended if not the standard to use oxygen absorbers and a mylar bag as a liner in the bucket.
nonsense. the original packaging is flimsy, fragile and lets in light.
bugs and moisture will get into your beans.
 

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This brings up a question in my mind, and I don't know where else to ask... forgive if it's seen as a hijack...

My MIL always heat-seals her 'mylar' snack bags, until the munchies are finally gone. (NOT vaccuuming, just sealing).
It really works !!
So, I've wondered if a cleaned out munchie bag could be used, merely sealed,
around store-bought rice or bean packaging, and extend shelf-life ??
Hey, I'm an unabashed second-user, and if that could help keep buggies out until I eventually use the stuff, why not ?

Whatcha think ??
 

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Discussion Starter #10
nonsense. the original packaging is flimsy, fragile and lets in light.
bugs and moisture will get into your beans.
That's not the question presented in the thread. The question is *when storing inside a 5 gallon pail* which is itself sealed people say to remove the food from the original packaging. I was curious as to why.
 

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That's not the question presented in the thread. The question is *when storing inside a 5 gallon pail* which is itself sealed people say to remove the food from the original packaging. I was curious as to why.
i assumed people were buying in bulk when doing the bucket thing, my bad.
 

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Few days ago I was going through some of the cabinets in the kitchen and found a box of pintos that I bought back in '99 getting ready for Y2K. I didn't really expect it to be there to tell the truth but since I found it I cooked some of them for that days meal. Even after about 3 hours of cooking they were still hard and practically unedible. My conclusion was that if a package isn't airtight then the shelf life is probably under 5 years at best. I just left them in the hot pan overnight and eventually they softened up but still were nowhere near where they should 've been taste wise if stored properly.
6 months ago i found a stash of beans that i stash for y2k (9 yrs old)in an air tight bucket and they 2 was hard. i had to cook them about 6 hrs in a crock pot,and they was still a little hard but had softened up some, if i had cooked them another 2-4 hrs they would have been fine. they was still soft enough to eat, but you could tell they just wasnt quite done.

another problem i didnt know where to store them so i had them stored next to my water heater so they was near heat :eek: BIG no,no. also the seal had been opened about 4 years ago. when i got married my wife had found them ,we had used about 1/2 the bucket, then forgot about them until i found them again. at that time they tasted just fine just like new beans.

that is when she opened my bucket of flour :eek: the flour seemed to be a bit flat, but we used it just fine :thumb: for frying not for bakeing. we use all of it then (4yrs ago ,which made it 5yrs old at the time) it was stored the same way near the water heater in an air tight bucket no vacuum seal. no problem with taste it was just fine ,just seemed like it wasnt fluffy more flat, kinda hard to explan.
 

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This brings up a question in my mind, and I don't know where else to ask... forgive if it's seen as a hijack...

My MIL always heat-seals her 'mylar' snack bags, until the munchies are finally gone. (NOT vaccuuming, just sealing).
It really works !!
So, I've wondered if a cleaned out munchie bag could be used, merely sealed,
around store-bought rice or bean packaging, and extend shelf-life ??
Hey, I'm an unabashed second-user, and if that could help keep buggies out until I eventually use the stuff, why not ?

Whatcha think ??
it will work but you need to freeze the beans/ rice 1st to kill the bugs. its a good idea to vacuum pack them

the y2k bean i mentioned in the post above wasnt vacuumed sealed. they was just fine until i had reopened them and used 1/2 of them ,and let them set for 4 more years ,and let more air into the container.they was ok just needed extended time to cook.
which i did in later cookings. it didnt taste as good as fresh beans do, but you can eat them. :thumb:
 

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OT: What to do with old beans

Hi,

I have done this with old chick peas and old black beans, and canning the beans really works. Other than transforming old hard beans into perfectly good beans this method has the added benefit of leaving you with beans that are instantly available for quick meals, all you have to do is open the jar, no soaking.

This method was not my idea, I found it at Back Woods Home, I have cut and pasted the reference for you.

Regards,

Kevin.



"Old dried beans



I’ve had pretty good luck with those old beans by soaking them in boiling water overnight (pour boiling water on the dry beans, then let sit overnight in a cool place), then rinsing, using fresh water, boiling them for an hour, and packing them into canning jars to within an inch of the top, pouring the water on to within an inch of the top, adding ½ tsp. salt to pints, 1 tsp. to quarts, then pressure canning them at 10 pounds pressure for 75 minutes for pints or 90 minutes for quarts. (If you live at an altitude above 1,000 feet, consult your canning manual for directions on adjusting your pressure to suit your altitude, if necessary.)

The pre-soaking, boiling, and pressure canning seems to help a great deal. If they still seem tough, pulse through a blender before you use them to make kind of a bean mash; it’s good in most recipes calling for pintos, including refried beans.

Another way to use them is to make bean flour out of them. Run them through your flour mill or meat grinder to chop them fine, then whiz them in your blender to make bean flour. You can use this in a variety of recipes. It thickens gravies and makes dandy refried beans when you add boiling water and simmer with spices in a pot on the back of the wood stove or in the oven. I’m sure a slow cooker would work too.

— Jackie"

From Back Woods Home
http://www.backwoodshome.com/advice/aj107.html
 

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Another way to use them is to make bean flour out of them. Run them through your flour mill or meat grinder to chop them fine, then whiz them in your blender to make bean flour. You can use this in a variety of recipes. It thickens gravies and makes dandy refried beans when you add boiling water and simmer with spices in a pot on the back of the wood stove or in the oven. I’m sure a slow cooker would work too.
No reason you couldn't make "bean bread" with the flour ? Yes?
 
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