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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought whole grain oats from the feed store. I was hoping to be able to put in mylar bags (with ox absorbers) and if food ever ran out eat and feed to animals. Now looking at them they look nothing like oat meal and after further research I don't know If I will be able to eat it. LOL. I did a few searches and did get much help. So are the whole oats a total waste?:confused: From what I read you have to boil them in water for 45 mins to eat. Thank You.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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There is not a darn thing wrong with whole oats, the only difference between them and what we buy as oatmeal is that oatmeal has been flattened with a pair of rollers. Flattening the oats makes it cook faster. You can buy a grain roller if you want, or you can run the oats through a grain grinder set loosely to produce oat flour for baking.

There is really nothing wrong with cooking them whole, oats can be added to soups and stews just like barley or rice. We keep whole oats for our horses and dogs and I have always considered them as part of my survival stocks.
 

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Oats are great food, as are all seeds. Like others said, run through a grain mill for a nutritional addition to regular flour in baking. You can make a hot cereal or porridge by grinding them coarsely, make crackers, pancakes, or fried oat cakes for breakfasts. Everything you can do with wheat, you can do with oats, except oats do not have gluten to make bread rise. Wheat does have gluten, so adding them together in baking will give you the right consistency for bread. The more you add to wheat in baking, the higher the nutritional level.
You have to store them the same as wheat because all seeds will get or already have weevils otherwise. Dry ice explained elsewhere is probably the best.
Remember that oats can also be planted for a continuing food supply for both man and animals, so they can play a valuable part in rebuilding later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, I though I was S O L. I hurried and put them in their mylar bags with oxygen absorbs because I could feel the ox absorbers getting hot. I hope just mylar and absorbers will do. Where can I get a cheep mill.
 

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Hulled or Unhulled?

If these oats still have their hulls on, they are probably suitable only for feeding to animals. They would be very very chewy if ground with the hulls still on.:xeye:
 

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PERMANENTLY REDACTED
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MOOO

Last time I checked feed store grain, there was a lot of chaff (husks/Hulls). Animals other than humans are OK with this, but it makes for nasty mush. Feed store grains are not certified fit for people, so you takes yer chances. But hey, what's a few Rat Turds...
OK, Here is the deal for making your own Oat Meal: http://www.kitchenkneads.com/index.php?module=store_listings&action=view_listing&listing=63
This puppy is one of my favorite pieces of preppie gear. It flat works...So with all the cash you saved buying goatmeal...Chuck out for this gizmo.
P.S. it will do other grains as well...
 

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If these oats still have their hulls on, they are probably suitable only for feeding to animals. They would be very very chewy if ground with the hulls still on.:xeye:
Depends on how coarse or fine you grind it. It can be made into a fine flour or anything above that. You can also winnow out the hulls if you crack the oats first. The hulls don't hurt anything if run through a grinder, even on a coarse setting.

You don't need a very expensive grinder. I've often found good grinders at yard sales. My favorite is one like this that I found for $2 at a yard sale:
http://www.877myjuicer.com/ViewProd...lME555byBacktoBasics/50.aspx?Category_ID=1022
 

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We got a bag of feed oats to use for fish chum and it got infested with weevles in short order, I mean tons of weeveles.
If well cooked the extra protien and oils would be welcomed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok, I have been buying veg oil for and gave 4 large bottles. Ok, so I will buy the grinder and I should be all set. I am going to buy more rice just to make sure.
 

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We got a bag of feed oats to use for fish chum and it got infested with weevles in short order, I mean tons of weeveles.
Well the wevels will be welcomed by the fish.

Pack grain in food grade plasitc and use dry ice (carbon dioxide) or Nitrogen to replace the air. Ganrantee no bugs will appear.

later
wayne
 

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I bought whole grain oats from the feed store. I was hoping to be able to put in mylar bags (with ox absorbers) and if food ever ran out eat and feed to animals. Now looking at them they look nothing like oat meal and after further research I don't know If I will be able to eat it. LOL. I did a few searches and did get much help. So are the whole oats a total waste?:confused: From what I read you have to boil them in water for 45 mins to eat. Thank You.
We get our wheat and yellow corn from the feed store. It's not a problem at all and the results are just fine. But, as someone else has said, whole oats from the feed store still have the hulls on them. I'm sure you've gotten the occasional errant oat hull in your oatmeal at some time and know what a pain that one small piece of hull is. Well, try multiplying that by thousands. You really need to get oat groats (dehulled) if you want to store oats for your own consumption. You can then grind 'em, roll 'em, or cut 'em. Don't waste you money and time on whole oats from the feed store.

gk
 

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Whole oats are what I buy.

Run them through a grist mill just to flatten them and break loose the hulls.

Winnow, and inspect to make sure it is clean.

Then you can cook them up in a porridge or grind to powder for breads, pasta or gravy.
 

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You shouldn't disparage groat porridge until you've tried it. Whole cooked oats are tastier and more filling than oatmeal, and have a chewy/crunchy texture that's quite appealing. I usually cook mine like rice: Bring water to a boil, dump in groats, return to boil before turning heat down and allowing to simmer covered until cooked; eat, especially with sugar and cream. You can also cook them overnight in a steel thermos, using 4 cups boiling water to one cup oats. Use a wide mouth thermos, though, otherwise you'll never get them out in an edible form (I speak from experience). Alton Brown (Good Eats, the Food Network) did a show on the virtues of oats (with some thumps for commerical oatmeal thrown in): here's a transcript, with recipes.

http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season5/Oat/OatTranscript.htm
 
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