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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new hear and this is probably a dumb question, but is there a place where I can buy a ready to go survival kit, or BOB as I have seen some call it? I am just now learning about this kind of stuff and I don't have the experience to build one on my own. Thanks.
 

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Last of the First Line
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A pre-packaged kit is most certainly not ideal. Sure - get one if you must, it's better than nothing.

But as soon as you can, start assembling your own. Do the research. Try stuff out, find out what's best for you.

I'd say find yourself a decent backpack, get a hydration bladder, a couple of bottles of water, a FA kit from Adventure Medical, couple of power bars, a decent knife (fixed or folding, your choice - hell, get one of each), a water purifier (those little bottles of chlorine/iodine tablets will do to start), a few different ways to start a fire + some tinder... And you'll be a lot better off than if you'd bought a pre-packaged kit.

Add to it as you can - with the best you can afford. Can't afford a $500 GPS doohickey? Get the best compass you can afford and a map.

Read - read - read... Find out as much as you can.

Pre-packaged survival kits are for people who want the feeling of security and safety without working for it. But they'll get a rude awakening when their mylar "space blanket" isn't the 3 bedroom pop-tent that they made it in their minds.
 

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You can google 72 hour kit.

I wouldn't though. Build your own. It ends up being cheaper and better. More tailored to you.
 

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Earthwalker.
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there a thousand post here on BOB kit,you are best to make your own and design it to your own needs.

use the search.:thumb:
 

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If you can build your own it is best. There are a lot of basic items that should be in any kit and you can find a lot of info on these on this forum. Your problem will be sifting through the thousands of opinions on what these items should be. First you have people like me who have been raised to survive and can walk off into the woods with nothing but a good knife and make it, and then there those who's basic BOB would take a one ton pickup to haul. You if you are short on time you may get frustrated with all the different opinions, but don't give up. You need to build this kit now. Good luck.
 

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I concur with the other posters here, BUILD YOUR OWN.

But if you got the money and you need something fast, check out this link. If nothing else use the list of items in this pack to start putting together your own.
http://beprepared.com/category.asp_Q_c_E_120_A_c2c_E_ln_A_name_E_EmergencyKitsandComponents

I recommend looking at the COMP II Emergency Kit. Not a bad assortment.
http://beprepared.com/product.asp?pn=K7 C820

I am also gonna post a list that Jerry Young put in a post a while back. VERY GOOD list.
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=30475&highlight=backpack




My version of the BOB/72 hour kit

Designed to get to help, or sustain me till help arrives based on 3-day time limit. Three days is kinda iffy now in some scenarios. Mostly I would need to add additional food (MRE's/Camper’s MH meals) and another water bladder to extend the time. This can be the base of further extended kits by adding items to the core group. I can’t carry much weight on my back, thus the game cart, which will allow me to add items if the situation calls for it. The item count is a little high, but most of the items are small and lightweight. Doesn’t weigh as much as you might think. <100# even with the game cart.

72 hour Bug-in/Bug-out Kit

Cabela’s game cart
Kifaru Marauder back pack
waterproof gear bag to carry water sensitive items
walking stick or hiking staff
sunglasses w/neck lanyard
2 bandanas
SAS survival manual
Glock 21SF
4 spare magazines in pouches
Cold Steel ODA field knife & sheath
Leatherman Surge
Wenger Survivor Swiss Army knife
small roll brass wire
small roll Gorilla duct tape
package medium large reusable zip ties
dozen nails/spikes
compass and local area map
Yaesu VR-500 multi-band radio w/extra batteries
whistle on neck lanyard
signal mirror
Garraty LED windup flashlight
Mini spray can of bright paint
Brunton butane lighter
lifeboat matches and tinder
Blast Match and tinder
piece of heavy plastic
2 GI ponchos w/1 liner
100 feet 550 cord
eight tent stakes
insect repellent
sun block
light sticks
candle lantern & candles
bottle Aqua Pura
Katadyn Hiker Pro water filter
hydration bladder
can/bottle opener
Tommy cooker & Trioxane fuel
GI stainless steel folding handle cup (for heating water)
German GI nesting eating utensils
large piece heavy duty foil
coffee/tea/hot chocolate/hot cider packets
12 Millennium ration bars
1 ½ pounds jerky
3 pounds gorp

spare keys
spare medications
spare glasses
packet of important papers
family photo marked w/names & relationships
health, illness, & medical information
phone list/contact list/rendezvous map & plan sheet
prescriptions
medical group card
Social Security card
driver's license
check book
credit card
plenty of cash
coins (for pay phones & vending machines)
personal ditty kit
change of underwear
2 changes heavy socks
spare shoe/boot laces
diary/journal w/pen
personal hygiene ditty
Camper’s toilet paper rolls
Camper’s soap
pack towel

first-aid kit
zip-lock bag
space blanket
mini-manual
fever thermometers (oral and/or forehead strip)
adhesive tape
alcohol wipes
aluminum foil (for sucking chest wounds)
triangle bandage
Ace Bandage
Band-aids (strips, finger tip, knuckle, butterfly strips, pads, eye)
gauze bandage rolls
sterile gauze pads
toothache ointment
ammonia capsules
first-aid ointment (Betadine or Triple Antibiotic ointment or similar)
petroleum jelly

(The following medications in single dose units/small quantity packaging)

electrolyte drink mix
Excedrin
Chloraseptic throat lozenges/cough drops
Day Quill caps
Night Quill caps
Alka Seltzer
Laxative (Dulcolax, Theralax, Bon-O-Lax)
Equate Larotadine allergy medication



Kept with backpack in their own ditty bags, donned as situation requires, put on the game cart, or leave behind

insulated underwear
ski mask
heavy boot socks
Carhartt arctic bibs
Carhartt arctic parka with hood
Neos insulated overboots or LaCrosse arctic paks
Wells Lamont insulated gloves
2 bandannas

light coveralls
hiking shoes
baseball cap or hat
2 bandannas

Tyvek hooded/booted overall
P-100 filter & safety goggles (or MSA Millennium CBRN respirator w/3 spare filters)
Nitrile gloves
Rubber garden boots
Roll duct tape
__________________
Jerry D Young
 

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Destroyer of Marxism.
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I'd build your own. For your specific needs. You can get good packs from Army Surplus stores. However, think about just how far you might have to travel on foot. If you have to go a considerable distance, you won't be going far trying to pack a box of MRE's, 2000 rounds of ammo, sleeping bag, tent, portable radio, flashlight extra batteries, shotgun, carbine, MBR, 2 handguns, extra clothes etc. Keep it simple, trained infantry legs don't carry as much crap as some of the people I've seen plan on carrying.
 

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I agree with the previous posts that it is much better to put your own kit togeather. In my experience, in the long run it will be less expensive than buying a prepackaged kit.

My first real kit was one that I purchased from a company in Alaska that specialized in survival kits for small aircraft, in Alaska they take this stuff quite seriously. It was quite expensive and reasonably well done but it was not as well done as it could have been. It had all of the necessary items but some of them were on the "cheap" side. Taking that kit and upgrading it and repackaging it did get me off to a good start, and I did learn a lot. But had I had access to a resource like this site at the time I could have saved my self some money and just put it togeather myself with out the "junk". Who knows that original kit could have been fine as it was, but I for one didn't want to take the chance on it, and I had the money available to do the upgrades.

If you don't have the time to do it your self a ready made kit is better than no kit. But if you are like me, you will not be satisfied with it.

Regards,

Kevin.
 

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It isn't all about the money either. Putting together your own kit will make you learn what you want from every item, and what a quality item is for each thing you need.

a space blanket is junk. Learning that, I found a sportsman's banket which is what a space blanket claims to be. I now have a useful piec of equipment in my BOB, not something close to tinfoil. http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...470305&cm_ite=0006243510214a&_requestid=94118

Each item is like this. It is worth your time to learn about knives. I bought my son a cheap one - he broke the screw off end within a week. The one in my bag is a LOT better.

the only shortcut I might take is to buy a Mountain House food kit. it depends though - are you sure you could get water? if not, you may want granola bars or coast guard approved rations.
 

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I also recommend putting your own together. Start with your local emergency management service or FEMA. Either should have info on their websites about what to include.

If you want a prepackaged kit, the Red Cross has some good basic ones to get you started.

I also like the Guardian survival kits.

Take a look. At the very least they should give you some ideas for what to include. Note that these are for "emergency/disaster preparation". For a "survival" kit, there are other things you will want and need to include.
 

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Destroyer of Marxism.
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a space blanket is junk. Learning that, I found a sportsman's banket which is what a space blanket claims to be. I now have a useful piec of equipment in my BOB, not something close to tinfoil. http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...470305&cm_ite=0006243510214a&_requestid=94118

Each item is like this. It is worth your time to learn about knives. I bought my son a cheap one - he broke the screw off end within a week. The one in my bag is a LOT better.

the only shortcut I might take is to buy a Mountain House food kit. it depends though - are you sure you could get water? if not, you may want granola bars or coast guard approved rations.
Thanks for the info on those space blankets. I could see them being useful if you needed rescue after geting lost, to signal aircraft though. I have IR strobes as well for night time.

I still don't know about carrying a lot of food. Freeze dried would be good, it's light. Hopefully you have a well stocked retreat, otherwise I'd stay home. The "living off the land" arguement is made elsewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you all for your help. From doing searches on this forum I found there are so many opinions on this subject it is mind boggling. It would seem that everyone has a different opinion on what needs to be in a BOB. I looked at that kit on ebay that was posted by Victor B (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MESE:IT&ih=011). What is wrong with a kit like that? It looks like it has all the basics.
 

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Going Postal
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You probably have all the basics around your house right now. I know I did when I started. Think water, defense, food. shelter/clothing. You should have some of all of that right now. Put it together in one spot and put it in something to carry it all with.

Ideal? No, but its a start.
 

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Advice on BOB

Remember the adage of KISS. Start small, maybe purchase a pre-packaged one to start with, lor look around the house to see what you have in comparison to lists. See what you have, add to it,then take it for a spin on a weekend. See what falls apart, what you need, what you don't. Years of camping as a kid with more than I needed was a good teaching lesson in weight, hiking up mountains in the rain with canned goods as a kid and forgetting the can opener.
It will most likely come down to you. Preferences and finances, all I can suggest is go out with it in all kinds of weather, even test it by leaving it out overnight in a rainstorm. That was one of my big learning lessons. Some 'waterproof' gear is anything but, or is such for a short time. A good quality bag is important! I have yet to find the primo one I want. Camelbak sells great ones for a price. I try to stress test gear a bit to see what needs work. Most people I know make mods to gear. You'll rarely get anything over the counter that will be the 'ultimate' piece of gear.
The usage, environment, and your bodytype will become factors as well as weight of gear and your physical condition. For a newbie I'd recommend staying away from most Coghlan gear except for consumables. Some of their products, from experience, fall apart quickly.
For starters I recommend at least a MiniMaglite, an Old timer folding knife or Spyderco, Benchmade or Kershaw folder, a Kabar or Cold Steel fixed blade, and a CRKT (Columbia River Knife Co) Stiff KISS. They KISS are no longer produced, if you're lucky to fing one, get it. I went through 3. Maybe 4. One of the best utility blades around, and inexpensive as well. The new model based on them is the KISS Flasher. I plan on one of those babies!
Don't forget good quality boots! And socks! In the race to get gear, some times that is overlooked. You can't carry the best BOB in the world if your feet are shredded (I've had the experience, it's no fun). Don't skimp on boots! Columbia, Danner, Vasque all have amazing features. GoreTex is good. Get something with arch and ankle support (again, experience! I had a pair of Martens that had no lateral support and twisted an ankle at work. In the boonies I would have been in trouble).
For now I hope this helps. Best regards, WWE.
 

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I will build you a custom BoB. Most of the pre-made kits are half junk. I am in the process of building a website for our survival business. One of the things we will do is to make custom kits for people. These are well thought out and designed for the individual. Instead of the cheap junk, we use the right gear for the job. It makes it a little more expensive, but very necessary.
 

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Most of the commercial kits like Walmarts are made up of low end products that you can do a better job of putting together. The main reason to build your own BOB and contents is to get you to make a plan. You have to do some work. You have to commit to paper what you are going to do and where you are going to go. Your survival is many times dependent on your mind not your kit. Take time to design your kit to go along with your plan. It takes time. Use it wisely.
 

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Most of the commercial kits like Walmarts are made up of low end products that you can do a better job of putting together. The main reason to build your own BOB and contents is to get you to make a plan. You have to do some work. You have to commit to paper what you are going to do and where you are going to go. Your survival is many times dependent on your mind not your kit. Take time to design your kit to go along with your plan. It takes time. Use it wisely.
This is good advice. Half the advantage of making a kit is taking the time to think about what you need and knowing exactly what you have and how to use it.
 

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+1 to most of the replies already here. It helps to look at pre-packaged kits or the contents others have included, but I'd use that for reference, and design your own kit to meet your specific needs.

Even more important - and where many people fail - is in USING the kit before you're put in a position to have to. That's the only way you're going to know if the items you packaged work as intended. It will also help you to better discern what should stay, what should go, and what additional items you may need. Next time you go hiking, or for a 1-2 day camp... bring it along... see if it works. You can always drive to WalMart & McD's if it doesn't cut the mustard now. Can't say that for sure when you need it.
 
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