Survivalist Forum banner

Where do you live?

  • Washington State

    Votes: 92 9.3%
  • Oregon

    Votes: 64 6.4%
  • California

    Votes: 119 12.0%
  • Idaho or Montana

    Votes: 49 4.9%
  • Wyoming or Utah

    Votes: 38 3.8%
  • Arizona or Nevada

    Votes: 64 6.4%
  • Colorado or New Mexico

    Votes: 68 6.8%
  • British Columbia, Canada

    Votes: 16 1.6%
  • Alberta, Canada

    Votes: 15 1.5%
  • Somewhere -- Anywhere! -- Else

    Votes: 484 48.7%
281 - 300 of 334 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,011 Posts
Compared to other major cities in the USA, the Seattle area definitely has more citizens who are in tuned with nature, going solar, raising livestock, gardening etc. It is still a metropolitan, but I would say it is on the top of the list among similar sized cities. Probably won't let when the zombies come.
And they do it because they like it, not because it is hip to post on Facebook or talk about at dinner parties (San Fran).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
I think Washington is a close resemblance to Montana except the saltwater. But I have camped and lived most of my life here in Washington and I think it has a plethora of options and living post SHTF. You just gotta know outdoors set skills of living on the outdoors. If you grew up in the city, you are maybe some ppl, behind the 8 ball and need to learn these post haste. I won't be leaving unless it's a last resort to head to any of the two mtn ranges.
 

·
Bushidoka
Joined
·
2,902 Posts
Cascading Dam Failures Would be More than a Footnote...

But much less than a foregone conclusion. I gather the Columbia dam failure scenario has not been assessed by qualified experts in the light of the relatively new knowledge about the increased risk of a CSZ MegaQuake.

Of course, none of the 11 or so US dams on the Columbia built before the 1980's would have contemplated the risk of a Mag 9 earthquake, either.

Now that the risk to more distant infrastructure is more fully understood, I think it's commendable to raise the possibility of a cascading dam failure so it can be fully evaluated and action taken.

However in describing the present situation, it seems fair to point out 3 qualifying or mitigating factors, discussed and documented in more detail below.

1. The operators of Grand Coulee Dam apparently claim to have evaluated the possibility of upstream dam failures and concluded that Grand Coulee itself can withstand the force of upstream dam failure, though the increased flow would overwhelm some downstream dams.

2. Information about earthen dams north of the border on the Columbia appears to be substantially incorrect. Of the 3 Canadian dams directly upstream from Grand Coulee on the Columbia, the middle one is the 175 m high 1.2 MAF concrete--not earth fill-- Revelstoke Dam at Revelstoke BC completed in 1984 (unrelated to the Columbia River Treaty). (The Corra Linn dam referred to is on the Kootenay, not the Columbia, and is described in Wikipedia as a concrete gravity dam.)

3. Distant dam failures do, at least, give advance warning: Residents immediately downstream may not get enough time to evacuate, but even at the unlikely average flow rate of 40 mph, it would still take more than 20 hours for the crest to cover the 800+ miles--and take out 11 more major dams!--between the uppermost dams on the Columbia and the major population centres around Portland. Likewise the power grid will have some time to anticipate and respond to successive outages.

There will be flooding. To understand why the flooding will be so horrifically disastrous, we need to go over some of the history of the Columbia River valley....

So, there are now several massive flood-control dams in BC. Keenleyside Dam holds 7 million acre-feet of water; Corra Linn Dam holds back another 7 million acre-feet in Lake Kootenay; and Mica Dam holds back Lake Kinbasket's 20 million acre-feet of water.

There are many other dams in the region, but the three above are particularly dangerous because they are partially or entirely earth-filled dams. They were not constructed entirely of concrete, as the Grand Coulee and Hoover dams were, but are instead piles of dirt and rocks that are only partially covered and reinforced by concrete.

These dams are between 300 and 400 miles from the coast, but that is not far enough to completely isolate them from a magnitude 9+ subduction zone event. They will experience severe shaking for a period of 3-6 minutes, which will cause settling of their earth-fill barriers and some subsequent reduction of structural integrity.

If any one of these three dams are breached, the waters released will quickly scour away most of the remaining dam material. The billions of cubic feet of water that will pour through the valleys will smash trees which will then become battering rams against any obstacle in their path. Debris-filled flood-waters that can achieve speeds above 40 miles an hour will rush through the Columbia River valley, removing everything that stands in their way.

It is doubtful that even the Grand Coulee can stand against such a force; and when it falls, another 9 million acre-feet of water will be added to the deluge.

1. Can Grand Coulee withstand one or more dam failures upstream?

Despite what I think has been a pretty thorough Google search for technical material or assessments of the cascading dam failure scenario for the Upper Columbia, I haven't found anything more than a few comments.

I realize the seismic risk of the inland northwest has only recently been revised upward, and I assume that none of the dams on the Columbia above the 75 mile portion called the Columbia Gorge was constructed with the higher earthquake risk in mind.

Intriguingly I did find there has been some fairly recent consideration of dam failures above Grand Coulee where it is specifically claimed that the failure of the upstream dams in BC would not threaten Grand Coulee itself, though the increased flow could damage some smaller dams below:

Dam Breach Assessment
With help from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and using all available flood data and postulated flooding events, Columbia Generating Station’s designers ensured it was sited far enough inland from the Columbia River and elevated high enough to avoid any potential flood scenario associated with the Columbia River. This includes a breach of the Grand Coulee Dam and the subsequent failure of the earthen portions of all downstream dams and release of their storage pools.

Additionally, river flows analyzed for a postulated Grand Coulee Dam breach were four to five times greater than those expected from a seismic event failure of Grand Coulee.

According to Grand Coulee officials, the likelihood of dam failure, particularly due to overtopping, is highly unlikely. Grand Coulee operators have run emergency action exercises with scenarios involving the failure of upstream dams in Canada that send a high flow over the spillways – 400 to 500,000 cubic feet per second. Though it would overwhelm the capacity of downstream dams, Grand Coulee is designed to handle up to 1,545,000 cubic feet per second through the dam structure (including the power plant) and over its spillways, without overtopping.


Dams on the Columbia River (click to enlarge) (map shows dams from Mica, Revelstoke and Keenleyside in BC to Bonneville above Portland)

In April 2011, at the request of Energy Northwest, the Bureau of Reclamation reviewed previous river flood modeling and re-validated that flood waters from a postulated Grand Coulee Dam failure would not be high enough to reach any Columbia Generating Station safety-related structures.

http://www.energy-northwest.com/ourenergyprojects/Columbia/Pages/Flooding-Safety.aspx

Is anyone aware of any more recent or contrary hydrologic engineering studies of this specific dam failure scenario?


2. Not All Dams Upstream From Grand Coulee are "Earthen"

There are only 3 Canadian dams on the Columbia itself. Besides the concrete Revelstoke Dam, the older Mica Dam some 90 miles upriver from Revelstoke is indeed one of the largest earthfill dams in the world, but it is said to be built on bedrock and has been extensively upgraded with internal concrete turbine channels & spillways, as well as the original exterior facing. Its capacity is quoted as 12MAF live capacity + 8MAF from the pre-existing lake McNaughten. The much lower and older Keenleyside Dam downstream is also earthfill & concrete, and has had concrete improvements and sidechannels added.

The Kootenay tributary of the Columbia flows north from Montana into BC before flowing into the Columbia at Castlegar. Besides the somewhat obsolete Corra Linn dam (which does hold back Lake Kootenay, but no longer regulates lake levels since the construction of the Duncan and Libbey Dams) there appear to be at least 4 other Canadian dams on the Kootenay: Brilliant (no info), Upper Bonnington (concrete gravity), Lower Bonnington (no info), South Slocan (no info). Duncan Dam on the Duncan River above Kootenay Lake is an earthfill dam built as part of the Columbia River Treaty.

Whether any of these dams will behave like "piles of dirt and rocks that are only partially covered and reinforced by concrete" in the event of a Mag 9 event off the coast and several mountain ranges away, I don't know. But it does seem like a reasonable question.


I didn't guesstimate on volumes of water held by individual dams -- that data is freely available on the web. As for how simultaneously it will arrive -- well, since the flood itself is the trigger that will breach dams on the way down the valley -- those that weren't already breached by the quake -- well, if that's the case, then the water will all arrive in a bunch, won't it?

I watched some films of dams breaking, and you'd be amazed how fast they empty out. The dams go from just having a crack to being completely gone in minutes or less -- it's truly appalling.

Also, the floodwaters won't be like rain floods -- they'll be more like a reverse tsunami, because they'll be filled with debris, and they'll be moving very fast.

Remember, that water will have a lot of kinetic energy. Lake Kinbasket is at 2450 feet above sea level; Kootenay Lake is at 1800 feet; Keenleyside Dam is at 1480 feet; Grand Coulee is at 1000 feet; and downtown Portland is only about 100 feet above sea level. So that water will have to convert all that potential energy into kinetic energy as it falls over a quarter mile in the process of flowing down the valley.
3. Dam Failures Will Afford Warning to Distant Downstream Populations
Fair enough, a failure of any of the major dams has the potential to trigger cascading dam failures to become a reverse tsunami, and there is certainly a lot of potential energy poised above the Columbia basin. But the whole Columbia River is more than 1200 miles long: It will take some time to come down. And whether or not communication infrastructure is operating normally, the potential for cascading failures and consequential flooding will be known and tracked from the time of the first failure.

...
BELOW is the shake map for last year's 9.0 Sendai Japan quake. (USGS link to map here)

The scale at the bottom (that's hard to see) is 100km, so the parallelogram is about 140x280 km, or 100x200 miles. Tokyo is the black smudge just north of the little pocket bay below the lower left-hand corner of the parallelogram. It's over 200 miles away from the epicenter, and it experienced very-strong-to-severe shaking.

This paragraph is a classic example of denial and wishful thinking. 200, 300, or 400 miles away from a 9+ quake is not far enough. There is a substantial risk that earth-fill or rock-fill dams will breach during or shortly after the CSZE. There is also a large risk of landslides that create breaching waves within dam reservoirs.

The 9.0 quake off the coast of Sendai was strongly felt in Tokyo more than 200 miles away. You can find lots of Tokyo earthquake footage on YouTube, including footage of soil liquefaction, the main mechanism by which earth-filled dams fail.

"Estimations" don't cut it when people's lives are at stake. I'm certain that anyone in one of the affected areas will want to see data and calculations before they will feel safe. I know that I personally will continue to warn people of the risk unless and until I see very convincing evidence that there is no risk of dams breaching.

The shake map below of the magnitude 8.8 mega-thrust earthquake off the coast of Chile on February 27, 2010 gives a better approximation of what we can expect from a Cascadia event. Of course, because the Juan de Fuca plate tends to slip all along its 600-mile length rather than at just one point as seen in this shake-map, the magnitude of the quake shown is smaller than the one we are expecting. However, it is still the same type of quake, so it is useful for study.

Note that strong-to-very-strong shaking was felt over 400 miles away from the epicenter. I want to stress again that this is probably a much weaker quake than we can expect the Cascadia Subduction Zone event to be.
I looked more closely at the Google terrain map, and you're right, the depot isn't IN the gorge. The Army depot is 2 miles away from the gorge, on a plateau at 500 feet. The river at that spot is about 280 feet above sea level, so the depot is about 220 feet above the river level past McNary Dam.

The gorge itself is only about one mile wide there, so let's do the math.

If Keenleyside Dam breaches but the other two big flood-control dams hold, then 7 million acre-feet of water filled with uprooted-tree battering rams will rush towards Grand Coulee Dam, which will be overtopped and very likely be battered apart. Grand Coulee holds another 9 million acre-feet. So, not counting the water from the other dams that will be battered apart before reaching Umatilla, that's 16 million acre-feet.

So, let's say the flood is 50 miles long and two miles wide -- the gorge narrows to just one mile in many places, but at Umatilla it's nearly two miles wide. So we have an area of 50 x 2 = 100 square miles.

16,000,000 ac-ft / 640 ac/sq-mi / 100 sq-mi = 250 feet of water.

The depot is at 220 feet, so it would be below the level of water even in this best-case scenario. It's "best-case" because the other two dams in BC will almost certainly fail as well in a full-length subduction zone event with a magnitude of 9+.

As my first post states, all three earthen dams in BC plus Grand Coulee hold 43 million acre-feet of water. How much water can the Columbia gorge hold?

Best-case scenario: if the gorge were 2 miles wide everywhere (it isn't) and 400 miles long (guesstimate) in Washington State, and 1/10 mile deep (about right, more or less, in deepest places) it would hold 80 cubic miles of water -- or 80 x 640 ac/mi x 5280 ft/mile = 270 million ac-ft of water.

So we're good... except that the gorge isn't currently empty. There's already water being stored in it, behind a series of dams. Also, it isn't 2 miles wide in a lot of places... and particularly at the Army depot in Umatilla, it's only 220 feet deep... and we're probably not going to see the water peacefully, evenly spread out over the entire length of the gorge.

The gorge is essentially a very long, skinny bowl with uneven edges... tilted towards the ocean. The top of Grand Coulee is at 1000 feet above sea level; the bottom is at about 450 feet. The top of McNary Dam is at about 400 feet -- which means that all of Grand Coulee -- every drop of that 9 million gallons -- is going to flow over the top of McNary Dam IF McNary doesn't breach (which it will).

How deep will the water be? A lot depends on how spread out the flood is. If it's all bunched together over a 100 mile long stretch of river, which is really closer to 1.5 miles wide, then 43,000,000 ac-ft / 640 ac/mi / 150 mi = 447 feet deep

That's 447 feet of flood water ADDED to the height of any water that is already there. So McNary Dam, at 400 feet altitude... PLUS 447 additional feet of water ... means that at 500 feet altitude, the Army storage depot with Red Cross emergency supplies is going to be under at least 250 feet of water.

Thanks for the opportunity to exercise my calculator.-- Paravani
Yes, you understand exactly. There IS no "invisible wall" holding the water back anywhere. It's water -- a lot of water, miles of water, more water than you can imagine -- and not just water, either. It's water filled with whole trees and houses and cars and dam debris and radioactive waste, probably on fire at some point, like a reverse tsunami coming down the Columbia rather than coming up the Columbia from the ocean.

It's going to go everywhere, because it's more water than the gorge can reasonably hold. Look at Google maps, and select "terrain" from the drop-down menu -- that will show you the topographic map. You'll have to look carefully at the elevations to see just where the water goes, but I think that it will overflow the gorge at Wenatchee, just past Grand Coulee.

If all three of the big flood control dams breach at the same time, during the mega-quake rather than after it, the flood will arrive downstream (Hanford, Kennewick, Umatilla, Portland, etc.) in three surges: first, the 16 million acre-feet from Keenleyside plus Grand Coulee; about an hour later, the additional 7 million acre-feet from Corra Linn; and maybe nine to twelve hours after that, the 20 million acre-feet from Kinbasket Lake, which is held by Mica Dam. Although these will come to Umatilla as surges, there is a bottle-neck where the walls of the gorge are tall and steep between Umatilla and the Dalles; this will slow the passage of water so that it begins to collect in the "bowl" in which Umatilla sits. For this reason, it is likely to reach North Portland in a steady stream that continues for perhaps 24 hours or longer.

That's my guess, anyway. Really, the problem needs a hydrological engineer to study it more thoroughly. I'm just an electrical engineer who knows more about how dams work than how they breach. -- Paravani
While it’s fine to dramatize the possibilities, I take it we just don't know what the distant effects of a Mag 9 quake will be in the inland Northwest up to the Continental Divide.

We don't know how vulnerable any of the dams are. We don't know what the shape of a resulting flood would be (though the rest of the Columbia Valley, the 1000 or so miles above the 75 mile portion of the Gorge (where it passes through the Cascade range) seems much wider to me than Parvani's guestimates). And we don't know how well the western electrical grid could respond to successive shut-downs.

So, yes, the problem needs a lot more than for one hydrological engineer to study it more thoroughly. But that would be a start!
 

·
Jihaadi GoBOOM
Joined
·
5,365 Posts
I don't know what the results would be, but I know what they have been.

My dad was in this one. It's not nice to mess with mother nature...
 

Attachments

·
KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
Joined
·
7,982 Posts
The Cascadia Zone is way overdue and has been getting a lot of attention lately....if/when it goes it will be one of THOSE Events...Everything will change from that day on...for everybody...not just the PNW..like the New Madrid...whichever one goes first will be THE one
 

·
25 Or 6 to 4
Joined
·
8,006 Posts
I had a dream a couple of years ago. The kind that sticks with you. Most of the people were gone around the sound. Not sure if it was a die off or they just left. Whatever had happened the roads we all long gone. Broken up. I made my living walking back and forth over the mts in summer. I made $2,000 for the whole year. one trip over and one trip back. It was a very large amount for then. Most would make 50 or 100 per year. There was mid size or 3 day pack and I took mail and things. The people put small dry bags in it till it was full. The mts were broken up, and there were cracks and slides and floods on a gigantic scale. The wasn't really any trail that stayed very long before it eroded away or the land shifted. In the east they had been at war for some time. Didn't appear to be a govt thing. More like an organized land and power grab and resistance. On that side, for one day when the mail and things came they stopped fighting as they each had a part of it and they both had to pay for the return trip. They came together and drank and got the next trip ready. Then everyone split up and went their way.

Had a half dozen primitive station camps and had supplies cached close to each. The trip took a lot longer because I had to hunt and trap and fish along the way for food. There was a canner at one and I made jars that were kept in stashes because the land was so unstable it might be difficult to find food. I'm not sure if there were no planes. no plane noise, and no where left to land one I think. This trip was a little different. Normal procedure was to walk till there was a crack you couldn't cross and fall a tree across it and scoot across. lather rinse repeat a dozen or so times. Most of the log crossings would still be there but some would be gone and a route change in order. My family lived in a valley on the high side that wasn't touched. There was a tiny village with about 10 people. Tiny houses in rows facing the main dirt road. Chapel,main gathering hall,distillery for beer wine and spirits that also heated the water for the showers. we sold showers and clean drinking water. small bar. barn and forged metal shop. And of course a crappy post office and tiny store where you could buy a sewing needle or other such things. The road didn't go anywhere. It was only in the town. trails connected to each end of that strip of road leading to other small settlements about a day away each. Or not at all in winter. Our town was just called junction. They moved the trails there when the distillery went in. I think the others were called bearings and willishter. Those were the names on the dry bags

I seemed to be the only on making any money and I used it to get supplies and pay the berry pickers/gatherers and pay for store stock. The idea of money seemed like we were just going though the motions to hold on to a dead thing. But we did need it to trade with the other little villages. That year was very different. Had made the trip over and back. fall was setting in. A man came on a horse about 4 weeks after I was back. He said he had an emergency trip and had a package. It looked like two kilo package of drugs. I wasnt much interested. I told him full price, because I had to carry food to make it back before the snows. It was already twice as dangerous because the rains had started and everything was shifting again. He said it had to get through and it was a serious delivery. The trip was uneventful.on the other side I was met. They opened it and it was bag after bag of medicinal herbs and several bottle of oils they were padding. They told me an epidemic broke out and everyone had stopped fighting and most were dying or gone. I told them I would come back next summer and see if we needed to make the trip anymore. Then I woke up in the bed of my tiny house, got dressed and went and walked down the trail and really did wake up then.

Some of the mts were normal and most looked like the middle picture in the bottom row above.

That was a really freaky dream. I hope it means the opposite.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
Discussion Starter · #289 ·
West Coast Carbon Monoxide Spike

Hello People!

Long time, no post.

This week I'd like to update this thread with information about a huge carbon monoxide spike on the west coast. The spike was far too large to be human made, and it followed the contours of the coastal subduction zone.

You can see it at this link here. This site is totally interactive, so you can zoom in, zoom out, rotate the globe to view the CO levels elsewhere, and step forward or back in time.

http://earth.nullschool.net/#2016/0...ographic=-99.66,41.00,1106/loc=-92.491,19.848

Click on "earth" to bring up the menu. On the "Control" line, click "Now" to view current conditions. Click on the single arrows to go backwards or forwards three hours (forwards from now will show you projected conditions). Click the double arrows to step 24 hours at a time.

Comments are welcome and encouraged.
 

·
All over Europe
Joined
·
3,360 Posts
Hello People!

Long time, no post.

This week I'd like to update this thread with information about a huge carbon monoxide spike on the west coast. The spike was far too large to be human made, and it followed the contours of the coastal subduction zone.

You can see it at this link here. This site is totally interactive, so you can zoom in, zoom out, rotate the globe to view the CO levels elsewhere, and step forward or back in time.

http://earth.nullschool.net/#2016/0...ographic=-99.66,41.00,1106/loc=-92.491,19.848


Click on "earth" to bring up the menu. On the "Control" line, click "Now" to view current conditions. Click on the single arrows to go backwards or forwards three hours (forwards from now will show you projected conditions). Click the double arrows to step 24 hours at a time.

Comments are welcome and encouraged.
How about a post saying I'm absolutely delighted to see/read you back here. As ever, your post is timely and informative. You have been sorely missed!
 

·
Senior Jr Member
Joined
·
436 Posts
Looks like they now say there was a glitch and there is no other evidence to collaborate it.
If this was true, high CO2 levels would mean what? What is this a precursor to?
Welcome back Paravani!

Hmmm, does someone keep adding more states to the title of this thread? Looks like pretty much all of the Pacific Northwest and central states, but I done see the Dakota's listed or those states in tornado alley.
If SHTF those people living on the east coast with your strong winds, hurricanes and high water flooding - there won't be any insurance companies coming along to give you money to rebuild, or many folks sending money through PayPal - I don't think...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Too funny, I haven't been on this board in years but after seeing people reposting the articles about the carbon monoxide levels, I decided to look up this thread again and reread what you said about the dams.

I spent the last 2 days trying to verify the information about the carbon monoxide. Many of the articles were really sketchy looking and alarmist. The data might be legit, but it doesn't necessarily mean that it's an upcoming earthquake. One Seattle seismologist's take on it: http://mynorthwest.com/11/2923602/S...zes-false-earthquake-reports-unlikely-stories

The original source has made many claims before that were based on some pretty bad science. That being said, it was a good reminder to go over our emergency plan here.
 

·
Dismember
Joined
·
1,970 Posts
Hi, Paravani!

I haven't been around until recently, either. I'm really glad this was bumped, since it's one of the most thought provoking threads, ever.

Knowing that a West Coast event impacts everyone, I've always been concerned, but pretty smug about our "private", (most of) Texas power grid.

I just realized, looking at the maps, that millions of scared and hungry refugees would becoming right to my doorstep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
So, if the western grid crashes, my wireless internet won't work and I won't be able to read what you guys post.
Interesting reading, and much food for thought.........
Thanks, guys.
Finally, some common sense. While some of the information provided may be factual, there seems to be a high degree of fear mongering going on here. Something which is not taken much into effect is the terrain, its like if the dams go some expect everything west and south would be inundated with water, we are not Japan, mountains rise thousands of feet right off the coast, we have deep gorges and valleys which the water would settle and lose steam. I live in the area, I am high up, would I be effected? Probably yes if I wanted to go somewhere or the quake took out my home, but I would survive just fine most likely. You can throw a dart at a map of the world, every single area, you will find a scenario which would be bad for where you are living, perhaps we should all be living on the space station in that case. Now lets look at the positives. Abundance of food and animals, low population density, plenty of fresh water, decent survival climate, decent growing seasons, mountainous terrain etc. I will take all that over the threat of a quake as a downside, I would not be devastated by floods, tsunamis, or power going down at all. It would be a tragedy for sure, low lying areas would be hard hit, but there is not a place in this world which is completely safe from everything, and most of these states/provinces have very little low lying area when you look at the topographical maps.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
Discussion Starter · #297 ·
For several years running, the south, midwest, and the east have experienced severe hurricanes and harsh winter storms.

As a result, many (far too many!) are moving to the Pacific Northwest, which has a far milder climate than the rest of the nation in both summer and winter.

So it's time to resurrect this thread, to remind you and them that not everything about the area also known as "Cascadia" is mild and welcoming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,988 Posts
Wow.

That was alot.

When it comes to the electrical side of things, you have to remember that between the left coast and say for simple actions, the west Texas border running due north to Canada eh as the outlying region of the western grid.
There are some concepts here that are a bit muddled.
There are many multiple electrical generating stations between here and there. in New Mexico alone we already have around 20 solar generating plants, about 30,000 acres (distributed in sections ) all over the state of wind energy production, coal fire generators and some geothermal generators.
So unless the shaking hits REALLY hard, the NM grid I think would definitely hit a bump, but not shut down. Plus all the states in between that have the same and add in nuclear generation and voila, you have plenty of unaffected grid. In fact we generate so much electricity, were selling it to CALIFORNIA! But alas, those neat little electrons buzzing about in them thar wires above your head may actually be pushing this diatribe right now, its simply the credits sold to CA. You cant really tag an electron as one going to CA or NJ or Timbucktoo for that matter.

That's simply not how that works.
Makes a great Hollyweird story, but Pierce Brosnan and Linda Hamilton are getting long on the tooth for this sort of thing.



To the earthen dam aspect we have seen this occur many repeated times throughout history in the left states and some areas in the midwest and especially along the Missouri/Mississippi rivers. anyone remember the 1990's or for that matter the flooding of (I think) 1986 or so?

I live in an area that could potentially be devastated if any subduction occurs with the fault line that sits just a few miles that also happens to be the western boundary of the Jemez Super Volcano Complex. Plus add in one of the longest earthen dam in the US is just a few miles up the road from me.

But alas I live about 100 feet higher than the river.

My family lives almost exclusively within the Lake Washington area between Issaquah and Seattle. there you have not one but THREE possible volcanoes including one due for a major pop. that being Mt. Rienere.

But alas, I am not concerned.

Can something go horribly wrong? Absolutely. But they are not worried, they have faith, and know when the time is up, there is NOTHING they can do about it.
They just live their lives without fear.
 

·
Retired curmudgeon
Joined
·
19,404 Posts
As a result, many (far too many!) are moving to the Pacific Northwest, which has a far milder climate than the rest of the nation in both summer and winter.
Leftist magnet. Works for me. (y)

But alas, I am not concerned.
I live near the Wasatch fault. In my entire life I've experienced maybe 3 earthquakes of which I either slept through or thought is was my dad coming down the basement stairs.

This is a far bigger threat to life and limb than a once every 100,000 years earthquake.

 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
Discussion Starter · #300 ·
Lagnar, your posts would make a lot more sense if you ever bothered to read just the FIRST post in a thread.

Lazy lazy lazy.

The Cascadia Subduction Zone has ruptured 41 times over the last 10, 000 years, producing a megathrust quake of magnitude 8 to 9+ about once every 238 years, on average.

However, it has ruptured more frequently over the last 5,000 years, producing a megathrust quake about every 210 years.

The last rupture was in January of 1700, over 321 years ago... So we're "overdue" by 83 to 111 years.
 
281 - 300 of 334 Posts
Top