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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Unlike many folks here, I know exactly what kind of disaster I'm preparing to survive.

I've been following earthquake activity worldwide for the last two years, with a particular focus on the Pacific Northwest because we are WAY overdue for our once-every-238-years "Cascadia Subduction Zone" mega-thrust earthquake.

Cascadia Subduction Zone mega-thrust earthquakes occur when the jagged Juan de Fuca plate off the coast of Washington and Oregon "subducts" under the North American continental plate. The average rate of subduction is about 3 to 4cm per year -- about as fast as your fingernails grow. Only, it doesn't subside at a smooth rate, but usually all at once in an enormous mega-thrust earthquake called a Cascadia Subduction Zone Event -- or CSZE, to save typing.

Because the CSZE mega-quake happens all along the coast all at once, the earthquake generated is felt along hundreds of miles of shoreline, and far inland. Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, Eugene, Medford, and Vancouver and Victoria BC are all at risk of severe damage during a subduction zone event.

I found this excellent BBC public-domain documentary on YouTube. It explains how the mechanism of CSZEs works, and discusses how scientists uncovered our past geologic history of mega-quakes. The only criticism I have of it is that it doesn't go far enough to describe the massive damage we can expect in the Pacific Northwest, nor does it describe any of the likely aftermath that will result from our severely damaged infrastructure.



As the documentary discusses, the last mega-quake here occurred at about 9pm on January 26th, 1700. It was about 9 on the Richter scale, the size of Japan's big quake last March. We know exactly what day it occurred because it generated a tsunami that wiped out Japanese fishing villages, so they wrote about it in their record-books.

What the documentary doesn't say is that the 312 quiet years since then are the longest period we've gone without a CSZE mega-quake since before the invention of the wheel.

See the time scale at the bottom of page 8 at the Oregon Department of Geology publication Cascadia Winter 2010

In those 312 years, at 3-4cm per year, the subduction zone has built up approximately 30 to 40 feet of unreleased stress between the two continental plates. When that stress releases, it will probably not do so instantaneously, in one massive jolt, but more like a zipper, starting at one end of the Juan de Fuca plate and moving 600 miles across the fault to the other end, resulting in violent shaking throughout the whole region that will last five minutes or more ... guaranteed to be the longest five minutes of our lives.

It's possible, even likely, that every city in Washington and Oregon will sustain major damage; that all the coastal towns will be utterly destroyed by both the tsunami, and by the six-to-ten foot coastal subsidence that will sink many of them below sea level; that all the primary transportation routes will be impassable due to fallen overpasses and destroyed bridges; and that perhaps fewer than 50% of the residents west of the Cascades will still have homes or adequate shelter after the quake.

But wait -- there's more.

There will be flooding. To understand why the flooding will be so horrifically disastrous, we need to go over some of the history of the Columbia River valley.

In May of 1948 the Columbia River watershed was so inundated with rain that on May 30th, even the Grand Coulee Dam could barely pass enough water through its enormous spillgates to keep the flood from over-topping the dam. It spilled more water in those 24 hours than it has at any other time in its history, resulting in heavy downstream flooding in Vanport City, which was on the north side of the city of Portland, Oregon. Vanport was destroyed when a section of dike collapsed, and 15 people were killed.

Subsequently, Congress passed the Flood Control Act of 1950 which mandated the construction of flood control dams in the Columbia River watershed; and in 1961 the US and Canada signed the Columbia River Treaty, under which Canada agreed to build several more flood control dams on Columbia River watershed tributaries in British Columbia.

So, there are now several massive flood-control dams in BC. Keenleyside Dam holds 7 million acre-feet of water; Corra Linn Dam holds back another 7 million acre-feet in Lake Kootenay; and Mica Dam holds back Lake Kinbasket's 20 million acre-feet of water.

There are many other dams in the region, but the three above are particularly dangerous because they are partially or entirely earth-filled dams. They were not constructed entirely of concrete, as the Grand Coulee and Hoover dams were, but are instead piles of dirt and rocks that are only partially covered and reinforced by concrete.

These dams are between 300 and 400 miles from the coast, but that is not far enough to completely isolate them from a magnitude 9+ subduction zone event. They will experience severe shaking for a period of 3-6 minutes, which will cause settling of their earth-fill barriers and some subsequent reduction of structural integrity.

If any one of these three dams are breached, the waters released will quickly scour away most of the remaining dam material. The billions of cubic feet of water that will pour through the valleys will smash trees which will then become battering rams against any obstacle in their path. Debris-filled flood-waters that can achieve speeds above 40 miles an hour will rush through the Columbia River valley, removing everything that stands in their way.

It is doubtful that even the Grand Coulee can stand against such a force; and when it falls, another 9 million acre-feet of water will be added to the deluge.

If all three dams plus Grand Coulee are breached, the total volume of water that will pour through the Columbia River valley will be more than 43 million acre-feet of water. The Columbia River gorge is only one or two miles wide in most places, with nearly vertical walls; it is not wide enough to hold that large a volume of water.

An acre-foot of water is 43,560 cubic feet -- literally an acre of water that's one foot deep.

A square mile is 640 acres.

If you had a giant swimming pool that was five miles long and five miles wide, and you filled it with 43 million acre-feet of water, it would be 2,687 feet deep. That's over 1/2 mile deep.

If your giant swimming pool is 10 miles wide and 10 miles long, 43 million acre-feet of water would fill it to a depth of 671 feet. That's deeper than most of the city of Portland. To give you an idea, the Portland Zoo is a few feet higher than 600 feet above sea level. Both the reservoirs on Mt. Tabor, which provide a major portion of the city's drinking water, are below 600 feet above sea level.

But wait: there's more.

Before the flood reaches the Pacific Ocean, it will have scoured the Columbia River valley clean of civilization as we know it. As soon as Lake Roosevelt overtops Grand Coulee Dam, the town of Mason City will disappear; then the torrent will overtop and destroy Chief Joseph Dam, Wells Dam, and Rocky Reach Dam before inundating the city of Wenatchee. The next dams to fall will be Rock Island, Wanapum, and Priest Rapids; and then the deluge will arrive at the Hanford Reservation.

Now, Hanford remains the single most radioactively polluted site in all of North America, in spite of billions of dollars already spent on the clean up. There are still over 170 huge underground single-walled storage tanks (of the size used to hold oil reserves at refineries, etc.) that have been leaking radioactive waste into the groundwater, and thence into the Columbia River. An aerial view of Hanford reveals patchy white zones; if you zoom in, these become visible as massive areas of leaching salts that are slowly flowing downhill, into the Columbia River...

... And then the deluge arrives.

Hanford disappears. The town disappears, the last remaining active nuclear plant disappears, and the poisoned, radioactive soil disappears. It is swept away with the river, to be deposited all along the downstream riverbanks and in the river delta... turning the most heavily polluted radioactive site in America into an environmental disaster of previously unimagined proportions.

More cities: After passing through and destroying the towns of Richland, Kennewick, Pasco, The Dalles, Hood River and Stevenson, the torrent of radioactive mud and debris blasts its way through and over Bonneville Dam, and heads for the really populated areas: Portland, Vancouver, and Longview.

On its way there, it will have destroyed over a dozen hydroelectric dams. The loss to our generation capacity will be catastrophic. Including Boundary dam on the Pend Oreille, the Western region will have lost total hydro-electric generation capacity of more than 21,000 mega-watts -- enough to power ten cities the size of Seattle -- representing trillions of dollars over a century of infrastructure investment.

But wait -- there's more.

There are additional earth-filled dams and older concrete dams on the western side of the Cascades. Hopefully most of them will survive the quake and its many aftershocks intact, but it is unrealistic to expect that all of them will survive. Almost certainly the majority of earth-filled dams will fail, because they are inherently vulnerable to damage by violent shaking.

There are also vulnerable dams in the Willamette River watershed. Above the college town of Eugene, Hills Creek Dam impounds 355,000 acre-feet of water; Lookout Point Dam holds 478,000 acre-feet; Cougar Dam holds 219,000 acre-feet; and Fern Ridge holds back at least 450,000 acre-feet. East of Sweet Home, Lebanon, and Corvallis, Green Peter Dam holds back 312,000 acre-feet; and east of Salem, Detroit Dam impounds 321,000 acre-feet. There are many other smaller dams, as well.

The good news is that except for a small dam at Willamette Falls in Oregon City/West Linn, none of the Willamette valley's major dams are on the Willamette itself; they are all on tributaries, with the result that if one dam breaks, it will not subsequently wash the other dams away.

The bad news is that nearly all the major towns and cities in Oregon are either in the Willamette valley or on the coast (which will be decimated by the tsunami and subsidence). And further, the majority of large dams are near the headwaters of the Willamette, south and east of Eugene. And of those dams, most are fill-type dams, either earth-fill or rock-fill.

So if only two large dams near Eugene are breached -- which is a conservative guess -- about a million acre-feet of water will pour through Eugene/Springfield, Santa Clara, Junction City, and Corvallis; then Albany, Salem, Keizer, McMinnville, and Woodburn; Newberg, Wilsonville, and West Linn/Oregon City; then Lake Oswego, Milwaukie, and finally Portland.

And once the flood has reached Portland, it won't drain quickly, because there is a bottleneck at St. John's Bridge where the river valley narrows between two plateaus. As has happened elsewhere in other dam-breaks, the debris will likely gather at the base of the bridge, further preventing the floodwaters from draining out of downtown Portland.

The time between when the Willamette dams breach until the flood reaches Portland will be approximately 2 to 3 hours -- about the same time the tsunami arrives up river from the Pacific. The flood from the Columbia valley probably won't arrive in full force until about five hours after that. So about the time the Willamette's floodwaters begin to recede, THEN the real flood arrives... and it will be at least twenty times larger than what Portland will have already survived.

But wait -- there's more:

In the USA, there are three main power grids -- the Eastern region, the Western region, and Texas. (Don't ask me why Texas has to have its own grid; it's just Texas.)

The reason that this thread is addressed to the entire Western Region -- WA OR CA ID MT WY UT CO NV AZ NM BC and AB -- is that all of those states plus the two Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Alberta are tied together in the Western Regional Power Grid which is overseen by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council -- the WECC.

Got that? We're all on the SAME grid.

On page 33 of the report linked above, you'll see a breakdown of planned WECC generation as of December 31, 2013. Hydropower is approximately 30% of all power generated, and most of those hydro-electric dams are located in Washington and Oregon, where they will be subject to violent shaking which NONE of them were engineered to withstand.

Western Washington and Oregon are also the sites of many coal and gas-fired power generation facilities, nearly all of which were also built before the area's seismic hazards were recognized.

The bottom line is that more than 43% of the the western region's electrical power is generated in the Pacific Northwest, and we use less than 25% of the grid's electricity. We export approximately 25,000 mega-watts of electricity to the other states in the grid year-round.

So, when the earthquake strikes, removing many of our hydro-electric dams and damaging countless other generation facilities, the Western grid will go down.

For those of you who live in western states more than 200 miles from the Coast, your first notification that the CSZE has occurred will be when your lights go out, which will happen almost instantaneously. Some time later, the tremors will arrive. They won't be as strong as they will be here, but you will probably feel them, and they will last for several minutes.

That will be your only warning that the power will not go back on again for a long time, possibly weeks.

You who live in the Northwest states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Utah should be aware that your electricity may not return for months or YEARS, until such time as we can rebuild and repair significant numbers of lost and damaged generation facilities. The Northwest grid can be isolated from the rest of the western grid, so that power in the other states may be restored with somewhat reduced generation capacity -- they'll have to suffer rolling blackouts for years to come -- but we in the Northwest will essentially be thrown to the dogs.

Our infrastructure will be profoundly damaged; our power generation capacity will be virtually gone; and before anyone can address the logistics of restoring our electrical power grid, we must first clean up the massive mess left behind by the largest earthquake in the history of the US.

Evacuation will be the only hope for those who have not prepped to live without power for months if not years... and it will take months to evacuate the millions of people who live here.

There will be many who will not be reached for aid or evacuation in time, due to the collapse of our transportation infrastructure. We are, after all, a land of many bridges.

-- Paravani
 

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I was just thinking about this earthquake in the last few days. As children growing up on the west side of Washington we were warned about it over and over. Now I live on the east side of the state, but have been wondering how it will affect life here. I knew the Puget Sound area is going to be in major trouble- we were always told in school the geography of the area will be dramatically altered. What I did not know was the information about the dams. Thank you!

Edited to add- please do continue when you feel like you can :)
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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Holy Moisture!

You posted all that at 0517 PST?

You've been up for a few hours, haven't you! :D:

(And I thought I started early!)

Yeah, this is sort of the Nightmare Scenario for the PNW.

The Red Cross is starting to pre-stage some disaster preparedness supplies at what used to be the Umatilla Chemical Weapons Depot in Oregon, partly in response to CSZE planning requirements:

http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-n...f/2012/05/umatilla_chemical_depot_transf.html

Here is a site with links to other regional and county WA and OR Emergency Preparedness Program sites:

http://www.csepp.net/

Sorta like "The Big One" in California, if it happens it will suck to be us.

OTOH, it may not happen for another 300 years - these events aren't consistently predictable.
 

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Unlike many folks here, I know exactly what kind of disaster I'm preparing to survive.

...

... but it can wait. I can only stand to tell so much of this at a time.

-- Paravani
Sounds like the making of a great disaster movie. You need to put a few characters into the outline that you have written.

There could be the crusty old fisherman on the coast of Oregon, The Gorgeous intelligent women that heads up a children's surgical ward in Portland who was recently divorced from her wimp of a husband. Of course the hero is a Geologist that is shunned by his fellow geologists for his warning of the coming disaster. Than there are the annoying but plucky children of the Dr. who spend their time whining because the smartphones quit working. They all survive due to incredible happenstance and movie magic.

You also need some minor characters that the audience can feel bad that they did not make it though also a few are ones the audience can feel good, since they are really bad people. Your outline leaves many exciting ways that the demise of these characters can be very dramatic. :cool:
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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Sounds like the making of a great disaster movie. You need to put a few characters into the outline that you have written.

There could be the crusty old fisherman on the coast of Oregon, The Gorgeous intelligent women that heads up a children's surgical ward in Portland who was recently divorced from her wimp of a husband. Of course the hero is a Geologist that is shunned by his fellow geologists for his warning of the coming disaster. Than there are the annoying but plucky children of the Dr. who spend their time whining because the smartphones quit working. They all survive due to incredible happenstance and movie magic.

You also need some minor characters that the audience can feel bad that they did not make it though also a few are ones the audience can feel good, since they are really bad people. Your outline leaves many exciting ways that the demise of these characters can be very dramatic. :cool:
I think I saw that movie, but it had Mount St. Helen's eruption in it. Or maybe it was asteroids.... :D:
 

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Good post. Ironic too, my wife, son and I just watched that EXACT same documentary two nights ago. (we were scrounging around for documentary's =) )

Too bad that BBC one left out the new Madrid thing, although they may have a second out there.

The real kicker is that people forget, and in the case of Cascadia didn't know. (although the indians did, and the japanese guy finding written records of the massive tsunami that spawned from it, combined with geographic evidence..) Things just aren't built for it up there. The New Madrid area they have no excuse for Memphis and other citys being like they are, that's just plain stupidity.

Both are overdue to go.
 

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Bloviator Sine Pari
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I've no doubt about your domino theory were a quake of that size and magnitude to hit, but I'm thinkin' the initial water flow isn't going to be quite as large as you calculated. It would be epically huge, but the entire contents of each reservoir doesn't all immediately evacuate the space at once. Still and all, that's just pickin' nits, 'cuz it would come, and it would remove all signs of man all of the way to the ocean no doubt.

The effect of ground shake on the earthen dams is predictably catastrophic, since the ground tends to act more like a liquid when vibrated.

You should probably contact FEMA/HLS on this issue. Washington's a "Blue" State, so I'm sure Yobo will do everything in his power (after all, he has made himself the all powerful Wizard) to see to it that these terrorists are appropriately investigated, detained and executed immediately. Just send them the drone vectors and they'll be on this like white on rice. :rolleyes:

Oh... wait a minute... I thought you said something about terrorists, but I'm looking again and I now see that you haven't included any in your scenario.
Look, I don't wanna be a Debbie Downer here but ya really need to re-work that whole "Natural Disaster" thing and find a "terror" angle, if'n ya wants the Ferals to fix it. They really don't do natural disasters all that well... just the unnatural ones that they create, and they really kind'a suck at that too. :(

Lampooning aside, I've spent a lotta time in the woods and on the water out that way, and the potential is definitely there. Hard to imagine that valley filling with water, but there's no question it would be biblical. I take it you'll be found elsewhere?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sounds like the making of a great disaster movie. You need to put a few characters into the outline that you have written.

There could be the crusty old fisherman on the coast of Oregon, The Gorgeous intelligent women that heads up a children's surgical ward in Portland who was recently divorced from her wimp of a husband. Of course the hero is a Geologist that is shunned by his fellow geologists for his warning of the coming disaster.
Hiya MattB4!

B4 when?

Seriously, that geologist hero won't be shunned by anyone. The CSZE might not be well known among average folks, but it's a gold-mine for geologists. The PTB in academia are just throwing money at geologists who want to study this area's seismic history and potential...

... Trouble is, it's awfully hard to find takers. A geologist really has to love, love, love earthquakes to stay around here for any length of time... and the geologists who live in other states call the ones who live here... uh, "stupid".

Anyway, I'll bet every one of 'em that does stay here is a prepper! :D:

-- Paravani
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Stupid, stupid, STUPID planning...

The Red Cross is starting to pre-stage some disaster preparedness supplies at what used to be the Umatilla Chemical Weapons Depot in Oregon, partly in response to CSZE planning requirements:

http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-n...f/2012/05/umatilla_chemical_depot_transf.html
Holy floodwaters, Batman! Those people are complete and total MORONS!

I just Googled Umatilla... and where is it?

You already knew the answer. That's right -- it's next to highway 82, in the gorge, on the banks of the Columbia River. :eek:

Our disaster supplies will disappear in the flood.

This is, however, completely predictable, since Portland's Office of Emergency Management is situated in downtown Portland, right on top of the Portland Fault, right below the West Hills landslide area, and right in the path of the Willamette floodwaters. :rolleyes:

So at least when our disaster supplies disappear, there will be no one left to tell us so, because all the people who are supposed to know where they are and what to do with them will be washed away before they are. :taped:

Holy Moisture!

You posted all that at 0517 PST?

You've been up for a few hours, haven't you! :D:

(And I thought I started early!)

Yeah, this is sort of the Nightmare Scenario for the PNW.
Well, ya know... once I started writing this post, it kept me awake just thinking about it.

Seriously... I've been meaning to post about this ever since I registered here... but it's kind of hard to face up to it long enough to write about it.

I'm only human... and the human response to disaster is denial. If I think about it too much, I freeze up and don't get anything done.

Here is a site with links to other regional and county WA and OR Emergency Preparedness Program sites:

http://www.csepp.net/
Thanks for the links.

I believe that the US Gubmint also sent us some earth-moving equipment 14 months ago, after that series of quakes off of Vancouver Island, BC. I saw about five miles of flat cars filled with military earth-movers -- bulldozers and plows, and backhoes, all in different shades of camo. The empty flat cars are still in the area, and they haven't been moved, so I'm thinking that the equipment is still here.

I hope so, anyway. It makes me feel better to think it's here.

Also, whenever someone posts about how "suspicious" they are that FEMA's buying up massive amounts of food, and they get all paranoid about FEMA camps... well, I just breathe a sigh of relief, 'cause I know why FEMA's buying all of that food, and I'M not going to feed all the sheeple who aren't prepping.


I've no doubt about your domino theory were a quake of that size and magnitude to hit, but I'm thinkin' the initial water flow isn't going to be quite as large as you calculated. It would be epically huge, but the entire contents of each reservoir doesn't all immediately evacuate the space at once. Still and all, that's just pickin' nits, 'cuz it would come, and it would remove all signs of man all of the way to the ocean no doubt.

The effect of ground shake on the earthen dams is predictably catastrophic, since the ground tends to act more like a liquid when vibrated.
Lampooning aside, I've spent a lotta time in the woods and on the water out that way, and the potential is definitely there. Hard to imagine that valley filling with water, but there's no question it would be biblical. I take it you'll be found elsewhere?
I didn't guesstimate on volumes of water held by individual dams -- that data is freely available on the web. As for how simultaneously it will arrive -- well, since the flood itself is the trigger that will breach dams on the way down the valley -- those that weren't already breached by the quake -- well, if that's the case, then the water will all arrive in a bunch, won't it?

I watched some films of dams breaking, and you'd be amazed how fast they empty out. The dams go from just having a crack to being completely gone in minutes or less -- it's truly appalling.

Also, the floodwaters won't be like rain floods -- they'll be more like a reverse tsunami, because they'll be filled with debris, and they'll be moving very fast.

Remember, that water will have a lot of kinetic energy. Lake Kinbasket is at 2450 feet above sea level; Kootenay Lake is at 1800 feet; Keenleyside Dam is at 1480 feet; Grand Coulee is at 1000 feet; and downtown Portland is only about 100 feet above sea level. So that water will have to convert all that potential energy into kinetic energy as it falls over a quarter mile in the process of flowing down the valley.

It is not a nice thing to think about.

Regardless of the danger, DH and I are still in the Pac NW, but up in the mountains next to a year-round creek, and prepping as best as anyone can. We can't move out of the area entirely because my DMIL is 93, lives on Whidbey, and loves her son, my DH. We have other family here, too; and we're both natives, come heck or high water. (Just a figure of speech -- we're not anywhere near the tsunami inundation area.)

-- Paravani
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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"It is not a nice thing to think about."

-- Paravani
Agreed. It's a little scary.

I found it interesting that TPTB were actively putting aside large amounts of logistics in emergency planning forward positioning. At least some groundwork is being laid.

Aside from that, if (just as you are staying put) a person is not planning on moving out of the area the only other prep is to be ready to evacuate in very short order! After the shaking dies down, if the sirens go off there won't be much time at all to head for higher ground.
 

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...
Seriously, that geologist hero won't be shunned by anyone. The CSZE might not be well known among average folks, but it's a gold-mine for geologists. ...

-- Paravani
The reality TV angle? :) Geologists mine for research money and strike it big with the Cascadia zone.

I just had a thought. I hope this does not happen on the 21st this month. The Mayan cult freaks will never let the rest of us live it down. Probably require a few virgin sacrifices (should have no problem with finding some amongst the followers).

Enough silliness. Like so many other potential geological disasters the areas in the NW are going to experience another big one. It is simply a matter of time. The world is a dangerous place and it behooves people to be prepared as much as possible. When you see the sea water run out to sea, it is time for you to run out.
 

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It's Survival Of
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This makes me happy to live where I currently do :thumb:

I probably need to dig a little deeper into the possibilities of what could happen here, but everything I read talks about catastrophe around me.

I'll probably live through the chaos around me just long enough to have to defend off the swarms of people running away, towards me!

I need to go pick up a few more of those 7.62 cases that are currently 50% off :eek:
 

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So, how does this react with the yellowstone super volcano and the new madrid fault line?

Is there a trigger effect?

How about the san andreas?

Do the dominos all fall at once and leave north america obliterated?
 

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There is no perfect place.

The geologic threat from this becomes one from the Yellowstone supervolcano as you move east. Further east is the New Madrid fault. The areas of the plains that are far enough away from this and the New Madrid fault not to be affected are still downwind from the Yellowstone volcano and have some of the strongest tornadoes on the planet and these happen every year.

Pick your poison. I wouldn't go and deliberately build a cabin on the slopes of Mount St. Helens, but I tend to be more concerned about how the godless urban dwellers of the pacific northwest will act when the grocery store shelves are empty and reality TV isn't being produced anymore.
 

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Tested in the Wilderness
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At first I thought this was ridiculous. I mean how can anyone say to not live in some of the most beautiful and most free states in these United States?

But now I think there should be more threads like this and Maybe more will stop fleeing from their state and taking over Colorado and even Wyoming.
Btw, Wyoming is worthless and desolate even though there is more wildlife than people.
I choose Wyoming as my BOL / remote mtn survival retreat but of course I must be crazy right? I also have a well stocked bunker - fallout - storm shelter which of course proves to the ones with "common sense" that people like me are crazy.

And my conclusion after this thread and so many other similar threads is of course everyone should stay out of the Pacific Northwest, CO, WY and all those remote mountain states.
Since of course the eastern seaboard and all big cities are Much safer to exist - I mean live in. :rolleyes::cool:
 

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And my conclusion after this thread and so many other similar threads is of course everyone should stay out of the Pacific Northwest, CO, WY and all those remote mountain states.
Since of course the eastern seaboard and all big cities are Much safer to exist - I mean live in. :rolleyes::cool:
Yes. Stay out of CO and WY... it's very dangerous here :D:
 

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Paravani's write up of the possible outcome of a major subduction zone quake of the coast of Oregon is well done. I am somewhat unsure that you would get a failure of the dams along the Columbia. It could however set off Mt. Rainier and St. Helens to erupt. Lahores and pryoclastic flows as well as ash fall would devastate local areas and the ash would carry to states adjacent, such as mentioned in the Threads headline.

Just like what happened to Japan, the possibility for a major strike fault leading to a Tsunami to hit the West coast is just a matter of when. The West has been without a major quake for quite a while now. Though there was a decent one in Alaska a week back.
 

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Oh boy. I just loved the way you sneered at everyone else on this forum by leading off with: "Unlike many others, "I" know exactly what kind of disaster I am preparing to survive".

Unfortunately, you DON'T know. Neither do the scientists. Neither do the producers of TV shows. No one does. No one KNOWS exactly what the future will bring. Yet, from the lofty heights of your two years of reading up on POSSIBILITIES (and watching TV), you have decided to favor us with your own personal vision of TEOTWAWKI. Complete with a poll. (Thank you, Karnak.) :rolleyes:

You are so obsessed with this earthquake scenario that you are ignoring MANY other possibilities that "could" also happen. That is what tunnel vision does to you. It sets you up to get blindsided by something you never factored in. While you are obsessing about the "big quake", something else is very likely to slam you right to the ground. Then you will be thinking: "How did THIS happen??"

But, why stop here with just a Northwest earthquake obsession?? Let's REALLY go for the gusto. Pull out all the stops. Think BIG. Obsess about a Yellowstone eruption in the Western U.S........which (according to the scientists) is due and overdue. The last major eruption from the Yellowstone volcano was 640,000 years ago. With smaller events at 70,000 and 3,500 years in the past. So, golly gee whiz.........are we READY for another one, or what???

Just think about what a dandy freak-out scenario THAT would be. The kill zone in the immediate area affected by the explosion would be gigantic. The ash from the explosion would destroy crop and farm production and pollute water supplies nationwide in America. Then, it would start travelling around the world. (The good news is that we wouldn't need an Ark, and we wouldn't need to run around rounding up all those pairs of animals. And drawing straws to see who is going to clean up that big mess in the bottom of the Ark.)

So, good-bye, America. We wouldn't even begin to recover for ten years. Maybe not even then. (You had better step it up on hoarding rice and beans.) Forget a water source. It's going to be polluted, anyway. Oh, wait. You can't go more than a few days without water. (And who has the space to store ten years worth of bottled water??) So, we are all DOOMED. Eventually. Almost nobody will get out of the Yellowstone scenario, alive. And, if they do, they will envy the dead.

Here's the real deal. There are NO perfect risk-free places to live. And, if you think there are......you are just deluding yourself. Everywhere you can go to live has some sort of weather-related disaster possibility. Mother Nature is just like that. She doesn't play any favorites. This is one of the few really fair situations in life. (Humans have a bad habit of strutting around, bragging about how we have "conquered Nature". Mother Nature just laughs and keeps sending us wake-up calls.)

The most likely "disasters" that have the biggest potential to personally affect you are major illness or serious accident injuries, job loss (with subsequent lack of success in finding new employment that pays enough to live on), or loss of your home (for a variety of reasons).

Any one (or more) of these can (and probably will) wreck you, financially. And, sadly, everyone on this board will experience at least one of these events in their lifetime. (Probably while we are still waiting for the BIG earthquake to occur.)

The up side to prepping for these smaller emergencies (although, admittedly, much less exciting than the Hollywood mega-disaster scenario) is that if you prep for these, you are also prepping for everything else, too.

And, maybe you might remember how to sleep at night, too. :D:
 

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The dams you mentioned in the upper Columbia drainage are all hundreds of miles away from a presumed epicenter off shore. Can you point to any other similar events world wide where failure has occurred? Did the 9.1 quake of 3/11 off Japan cause any dam failures? There must be a least a few within a several hundred mile radius of that epicenter. Surely there must be a quake that's happened some where in recent history close enough to at least one dam to provide some base data. New Zealand? Mexico? South America? :confused:

Evidence please.
 

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You are so obsessed with this earthquake scenario that you are ignoring MANY other possibilities that "could" also happen. That is what tunnel vision does to you. It sets you up to get blindsided by something you never factored in. While you are obsessing about the "big quake", something else is very likely to slam you right to the ground. Then you will be thinking: "How did THIS happen??"

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I think you might be guilty of overstating Paravani's reasoning as well as her state of preparing. I believe that anyone living on the West Coast should be ready for a major disruption from a earthquake. I saw several why I lived there from the '66 quake in Seattle to the Oakland quake in '89. I watched the results of the Northridge quake of 1994 on TV and had relatives that lived through it.

Earthquakes in that region are not a fantasy disaster scenario that happens every several hundred thousand years. If I still lived in the region I would constantly keep it in mind.
 
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