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Leave Me Alone
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When I was younger, I had the privilege of knowing my Great-Grandfather. He was a hard nosed World War 1 veteran, who had lived through trench warfare, gas attacks, continuous bombardment by artillery for days at a time and other horrendous conditions of the soldier in the Great War. I remember the scars he had over his body, but a clear mind and a determined strength. He taught me valuable skills in the woods and around his small farm and cabin. My Great Grandmother had died years earlier. I would sometimes spend weeks or even summers with him and would be his shadow everyday.
I used to laugh when friends would all get together to go deer hunting. All of these great white hunter types would show up in camo from head to toe, 3 wheelers (at that time), 1500 dollar rifles with 800 dollar scopes with 15 power magnification, deer scent or scent cover up and deer stands up in the trees. He would chuckle and shake his head, "You guys spend 10,000 dollars a year to go out and try to kill a deer, that is if you finally manage to kill a deer." He wore kakhi pants or jeans with a plaid flannel shirt, laced up brown leather military boots with his pants legs bloused into them to keep the crud and bugs out, an old military campaign hat (smokey the bear). He would sit on a folded blanket leaning against a tree, smoking cigars, eating spam, and shooting an old Springfield 1903 Military Issue Rifle with standard sights and hit anything within 150 yards. He ALWAYS got a deer and stocked his freezer and jerky supply. Meanwhile the great white hunters were shooting at Bambi and missing with their big dollar rifles while soaked in deer **** cover up scents. :D:
This man taught me so much about scavenging that he learned on the battlefield, when food was scarce and people were wanting to shoot you while you looked for food. He taught me about the basics of carrying emergency gear. We would also go camping with everything we needed in a small pack on our backs, and a couple of rifles.
I read alot of books, watch alot of videos, and seek advice from those more experienced than I. My Dad and Grandfathers taught me alot, but I will never forget, nor could I ever put a value on the knowlege given to me by a hardnosed old soldier who taught me what it was like to live with very little and enjoy it. I still have his old Soldier Springfield Rifle, his Old worn military sheath knife and an oiled canvass shoulder bag he always carried in the woods on those hunting trips. He taught me that no matter what guns you have, a man should always have these 4 guns in his personal armory. A Springfield 03 or 03A3, John Brownings Automatic Shotgun (A5), John Brownings 1911 45 Auto Pistol, and a good 22 rifle. To this day, I would never be without them. What a guy! :thumb:
 

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Sounds absolutely amazing. Unfortunately I was born and raised, and currently live in, a suburban environment, so I've never been fortunate enough to have the experience of silently walking through a forest with my grandfather or father looking for deer. My father does take me fishing and shooting when we are up in the mountains during the summer, so everything I've learned about fishing and shooting, I've learned from him. It's too bad we've never gone hunting together.

My grandparents moved to America during WWII. They were living in Latvia when the SHTF, and my grandfather was actually drafted to both the German Army and the Soviet Army throughout the course of the war. He has told me stories that I'd expect to see in a WWII movie. I don't think my grandparents have any sort of artifact from their youth, not even a single photograph. All my grandfather has is a small piece of debris buried in the skin between his index finger and thumb, where a piece of shrapnel passed through.
 

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I participate regularly in WWII Tactical Reenactments and learn alot about moving, firing, thriving, and surviving. Half the guys in the hobby are ex military or even active. I reccomend it.
 

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My Grandfather and Father both were avid backwoodsmen. As far back as I can remember I've been taught to love and respect nature and all she has to offer. Learning the skills of Trapping, Hunting and fishing is just a way of life for me. Primitive skills, ( I wont call them survival skills), Because these were skills passed down to me that were just an everyday way of life. These skills used to be common skills. My Grandfather taught me things that were passed to him by his father and grandfather, and so my father. Unfortunatly the heritage stops with me as I was never blessed with children to pass this knowledge to. I do however pass on some tidbits to friends here and there. Its been a wonderful life and am still amazed and awed by nature and her ways and still have much to learn. The day I stop learning will be a good day to die.
 

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Guess most of us had a Grandfather that was wise in the woods way. Mine was a farmer and had to feed his family with is strong back and a single shot .22 and a old double barrel 12 gauge. I got to spend time with him enough that he taught me to drive his old pickup and chew Beechnut tobacco. But he and Dad taught us boys to garden, hunt and fish. But I dare say that I have had many mentors through the years. I have been lucky enough to befriend many great fisherman, and hunters. Good gardeners and people that could can and preserve food that gave me proper instruction.

I in my old age am now still in a learning process and am now having to impart some of what I have learned to the younger generation. We all have some knowledge that is useful to hand down at any age. But the older and wiser should be listen to very carefully before some of there knowlege is lost forever.

The Wood Duck
 

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Adaptable.
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My dad was a Korean war marine, a construction worker and prospector. He started me. Then I became a cub scout then later a boy scout. Spent high school years working on computers during the week and wandering the nearby national forest on weekends. Joined the army, and surprised myself by finishing ranger school. Got into endurance racing and through hiking, hitchhiked the south, and met slot of people who knew way more than me. Stayed camping and hiking, and set out in 2006 to go land shopping on foot. It took less than 300 miles.

Now I live on a very remote, mountanous 44 acres, building a house and playing. I work for the owners of a 168 acre ranch that is being reclaimed as a wildlife preserve. My employers are quite smart and teach me lots, and our few dozen volunteers often teach me quite a bit.

Of course I read alot, but I don't feel that I really learn anything until I can do it in reality, so outdoors books today are just big catalogs of ideas to try.

I think the most important thing I've done in my education is to remember that everyone has something to teach you, and the only challenge is convincing them to.
 

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Wide awake
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1) My mother who is a survivalist who doesn't even know what a survivalist is. When my father left when I was younger, I watched her go to great lengths to feed her family. Today at 65 yrs old, she's still splitting firewood, raising crops, and doing more heavy lifting than most men I know. When I go home and try to help ease the burde, she gets mad at me for assuming she can't make it on her own.
2) The Marine Corps. I learned to hunt (though not animals), survive in the cold and heat, plan, and go without the comforts of life. May the Corps never reflect the decay that has overtaken American society.
3) People like all of you. I have learned so much from you here at survivalboards its incredible.

______________________________________________

"Civilize the mind, but make savage the body."
 

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wide awake
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I was fortunate enough to grow up being around my great-grandparents quite often. They both lived through the Great Depression, and were God-fearing, practical, honest people. Mammaw cooked three meals a day, and she and Pappaw had a large garden, chicken houses and cattle, canned every summer, etc. They raised my mom, and she always gardened and canned, even when we lived in the city. Being frugal and making the best from what you have has always been a way of life in my family. The older I've gotten, the more I realize the knowledge they blessed me with is absolutely priceless. I don't think I'll ever be able to live up to the example they set.
 

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The skills and knowledge here are an irreplaceable resource. May we all not only continue to learn, but pay it forward by teaching what we know to those who want to learn.
 

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My Grandfather lived in Russia during the Russian revolution. He and his brother were out hunting boar on horse back. They brought their kill home, only to find out the revolutionary solders had come through their village and killed my Grandfathers' family.

So he and his brother took off after these solders. The solders broke up into 2 groups and headed in different directions.

So my grandfather went after one group and his brother went after the other group. His brother killed the men in the one group, but was caught later and hung by his neck until he was dead.

My Grandfather killed all but one out of the group he was chasing. He was never able to find that last solder.

There was a warent in Russia on him for treason until the day he died. He never did get to go back home.

But he was a wonderful Grandfather.
 

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Warning: EXPLOSIVE!
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My family has been from backwoods Maine for a long time, (My euro side around 1550... native American side... who knows) I got away from the backwoods for a while in my early 20's and forgot alot of things about wild yummies...lol... I have put myself back in touch with my primal side and have relearned almost everything and picked up a little more info along the way.
I continue to be a spongue about anything to do with wilderness survival. I took a class a few years ago with an "outdoor survival expert". 90% of the info and hands on was stuff I already knew... He saw me eating some weeds during the outdoor part of the trek... And asked what the hell are those and how do you know they are not poison... My reply was I dont know what they are called but, I've been eating these things all of my life...as many generations before me...
 

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Most of my survival minded thinking came from my grandfather, he told me the only reason the family made it through the depression was because he and the rest of the family planned ahead, and lived a meager existence, like most people of that era. Basic weapon instruction was given to me by my father (vietnam era marine). I was raised around firearms. We fished when ever we could. All of my uncles were military vets. Talk about a colorful childhood. They would all get soused and grab me and show me how to ''snoop and poop'' without getting caught. Taught me about fire, water, knifes. Hell I've been carrying a knife since I was 6 years old. I've lived in many climates of this nation and have picked up different skills from the different areas. I've hiked up the side of Mt.white, I've forged across rivers in the backlands of idaho, Camped and hiked 18 miles through death valley in june. I am currently getting back into the rugged way of life and I have a few books on order that I'm going to weed through to refresh what I've forgotten.
 

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To secure peace is to...
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1) I grew up near some old-timers who were old school garderners and I learned a lot about gardening and canning from them.

2) I have hunted deer, turkey, dove, squirrels, and coyote for years.

3) I have fished since I was old enough to walk and fish at least once a week now.

4) I have been an avid backpacker for years and still take several trips a year.

5) I love shooting and own multiple firearms and a large undisclosed number of rounds for each.

6) Lastly, to continue my "education" I have been reading online articles and plan on buying some good books to supplement my survival education.
 

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Knocked Down But Up Again
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I learned unimaginable amounts of knowledge from my grandmother. She was nine years old during the Great Depression and was already on her own because her step-father didn't want her around. Any little girl who can make a living for herself at the age of nine and doing it during the Depression is someone you pay attention to.

I'd like to go back in time and kick the spit out of my grandmother's mother, but that is a different thread altogether.
 

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My father is retired Army, he taught me how to hunt, fish, shoot guns, how to be silent in the woods, how to box, how to sharpen knives, etc. My brother was in the police force and was a firefighter, he taught me more advanced shooting techniques, basic CQC, basic medical knowledge, basic fire fighting. They sparked my interests and I progressed on my own.
 

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Back when dinosaurs roamed the earth :) I was certified as both a Master Gardener and a Master Food Preserver through my county extension service here in Oregon, repaying my training by committing to 60 hours minimum community service and education at such events as 4-H meets, county fairs, and public gardening seminars. It was an exceptional learning and teaching experience to add to my family knowledge of farming, food preservation, and self-sufficiency. I still use this knowledge gained to share with others and to prep.

I just checked to see if these programs are still being offered in my state, and this is a current list:

* Master Gardeners
* 4-H Youth
* Family Community Education (study groups)
* Master Food Preservers
* Family Community Leadership
* Food and Nutrition Educators
* Master Recyclers
* Master Woodland Managers
* Parent Educators
* Master Anglers
* County Advisory Councils

You can see the possibilities...If you're not familiar with your county's Extension Service, you might give them a call to see if similar programs are offered in your area. Great networking possibilities with like-minded people, too!
 

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st.regis reservation here.Got drooped in the Adirondacks with a book a matches and knife 5 days later here my grand dad came and got me. Made a throwing stick and ate rabbit
 
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