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There are some video's on how to make your rat traps more effective for hunting. Drywall screws or nails on the bottom snapper edge and wire cage around the bait.Chaining them down to prevent dragging off trap also. I have a couple of old gopher traps too that still work .
 

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Are we are talking about survival for more than a week or two? Will you are going to have problems if your only option is food with ammo. How much ammo are you carrying?
Should we go with snares? Snares are like bullets, you get one shot with them. If you have 5 snares in your pack, then you have five meals. You won't be able to reuse any snares after a catch. They are a once and done item.
So what about traps?
Body Grip is one of the most popular and effective options. It will quickly crush the pest to death. It can be set in many different ways and baited to lure the rabbit. These types of traps are very effective. However, these may not be legal in your area.
One can use a live trap. Most places allow these traps. And you can practice with them now. However most people do not carry one of these around with them.
Finally there is the figure four deadfall trap. If you are in a wooded area you likely have the material to build one of these.

The point of this is you need a means of obtaining game without wasting all your ammo. So think of the game and fowl you will want to catch and how you can do it on a ongoing basis!
I think you are missing a great deal about traps and trapping.

A couple dozen steel foothold traps will hold a small to large animals and last for many decades if constant use. I still own some of the long spring and coil spring traps I bought with my fur checks in the late 1960s and 70s. I just retired my first Conibears purchased in 1976, because the trigger wires came loose.

You can add swivels to your cable snares. This will help prolong their life, but if you dont catch a coyote by the neck, they will still twist them up. So unless you are just snaring rabbits, the cable used for snaring is a consumable. I bought 500' of cable last summer.

Here is a list of steel traps available today:

The Weasel Trap The Number 0 long spring (3 1/2" Width) is the smallest size of steel foothold trap, and is intended for such small animals like Pine Martens, Squirrels, Rats, and Weasels. If the spring is of fair strength as is in the higher grades they may also be used for muskrat. They are used extensively by marten trappers in Alaska and the Rocky Mtns.

The Muskrat Trap The Number 1 long spring (4" Width) is known as the muskrat trap and is the best size for this animal. It is available as a stop loss or with double jaws to prevent twist offs. It is also used for Mink, Possum, Rabbits, Skunk, Squirrel, and Woodchuck.

The Mink Trap The Number 1 ½ coil spring (4 7/8" Width) is a very popular trap and their size and strength adapt them for general use in water sets. Known as the Mink trap, it is also used for Fox, Muskrat, Opossum, Raccoon and Skunk, and similar animals.

The Fox Trap The Bridger Number 1 3/4 coil spring (5 1/8" Width) was designed in response to the range expantion of Coyotes to farm country. It offers a reinforced frame, center mounted chain, offset jaws, and can be fitted with extra coil springs. Designed for Fox, Mink, and Raccoon, the larger size and strengh also makes it suitable for Badger, Bobcat, and Coyote.

The Coyote Trap The Number 2 coil spring (5 1/2" Width) round jaw was designed as a dry land predator trap. It has a strong frame and jaws, and is wide and strong enough to handle the large feet of Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, Fisher, and Red Fox.

The MB 550 RC coil spring is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. The heavy offset cast jaws have the same (5 1/2") jaw width as the #2 coil and a greater jaw length (6 1/4"). This allows the use of an oversized Paws I Trip Pan and a night latched dog. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The amount of pan force needed to trigger the MB 550 can be easily adjusted by bending the dog, making this trap suited for Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, Fisher, Fox, and Raccoon.

The Otter Trap The Victor Number 3 coil spring (5 7/8" Width) has been named the Otter trap, and it is the proper size to use for this animal. Like the MB 550, the jaws are longer than they are wide and this allows room for an oversized pan. It is available with forged offset jaws, a center mounted chain, and four coil springs. It is also well suited for Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, and Fisher: and other dry land predators.
The Sleepy Creek Number 3 double long spring (6" Width) is a widely used as a late season Bobcat and Coyote trap. It is the proper size and it's spring design allows it to function under freeze/thaw conditions. It is a very strong trap, and is suited for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, and Otter.

The Beaver Trap The Bridger/Northwoods (B/NW) Number 3 Coil Spring (6 1/2" Width) have reinforced base plates, a center mounted chain, crush proof swivels, and is available with offset jaws, and two additional coil springs. They are widely used for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, and Otter, and are strong enough for Panther and Wolves.
The MB Alpha #3 coil spring is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. The heavy offset cast jaws have the same jaw width as the MB 550. This trap uses a new dogless pan system. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The size and rugged construction of this trap makes it suited for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, Lynx, Otter, Panther, and Wolves.

The Wolf Trap The MB 750 Wolf coil spring (7 1/2" Width) is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. it features heavy offset jaws and a special dogless pan system that locks down both jaws. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The size and rugged construction of this trap makes it one of the premier traps for Panther, and Wolves.

Body Grip Traps: A third type of trap, the body grip, was designed by a Canadian man named Frank Conibear. It is a open square frame of heavy steel rods and is designed to capture the target animal by clamping down using a scissor action on the body, neck, and the head, effectively killing the animal out right. These traps are favored for water sets and will capture a swimming animal.

These Conibear traps were first produced and marketed by the Onieda Victor company and Victor brand body grip traps still bear the name of the original designer. Body grip traps produced by other companies are also commonly called Conibears, as a testimony to the genius of the original design.

Body grip traps sizes range from the Number 110 to Number 330. Number 110 (4.5" x 4.5") Marten, Mink, Muskrat, Opossum, Rabbit, Skunk, Squirrel, Large Fish. Number 150 (5" x 5") Mink, Muskrat, Nutria, Opossum, Rabbit, Raccoon, Skunk. Number 160 (6" x 6") double spring, Fisher, Nutria, Opossum, Raccoon, Skunk Number 220 (7" x 7") double spring, Badger, Bobcat, Fisher, Otter, Raccoon. Number 280 (8" x 8") double spring, Beaver, Lynx, Otter, Wolverene. Number 330 (10" x 10") double spring, Beaver, Lynx, Otter, Wolverene.

Dog Proof Raccoon Traps: This is a new category of steel trap featuring a fully enclosed trigger. It is designed to take advantage of the raccoon's tendency to reach into holes and pull out food items. But since domestic dogs lack this ability, it is almost completely dog proof. A wide variety of these trap designs are being developed and marketed. Most of them resemble a metal pipe or a discarded metal can.

**** Dagger - Overall design of the **** Dagger is okay. I am not particularly fond of how the jaw of the trap is exposed on half of the trap. This is location specific for me but my issue was with the angle stake on the trap I had a hard time getting the trap bedded firmly in the hard clay that we have in North Georgia.

Freedom Brand FB1 - I LOVE how easy this trap is to set. Just squeeze the solid plate in to the body of the trap and "click" its set. The only problem is, with the ease of setting comes some slightly more complicated mechanical features that need to be attended to. I wondered why I was having the trap cleaned out but not making any catches. Turns out these traps may need a little tweaking to get them to fire correctly. The good thing about them is that with a little adjusting they can be made to fire very easily, Clint Locklear has a great video on how to adjust these traps.

Z-Trap - By far my favorite dog proof trap that I tested last season. These traps are very similar in design to the Dukes. I like the spike stake, I'm not real crazy about the circle on the stake, but I imagine if you are setting them in soft ground that helps stabilize the trap. These are simple traps, there is no tweaking or adjusting, and my favorite feature is on the trigger. Where the trigger meets the dog on most traps everything is square, but on these traps the trigger portion is round. Such a genius, yet simple idea. That makes the trap so much easier to fire than if it were squared off. But its not so easy that you have a hair trigger trap that fires without even being touched.
 

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My reasoning is a bit different.
For ammo bulk , weight , velosity, an accuracy I chose 17 HMR.
In a post SHTF event medical help will be rare, any hit can be lethal, or at least seriously damaging.
That said, I can place better shots with my 17 than I can with any other gun I own, especially at significant distances.
The 17 is 1/5th the volume of a .223 so I can Cary more of them. The volume of tools and reloading gear one might need pales in comparison.
If I have sufficient ammo the last thing I’m worrying about is reloading, with so many other things to concern my self.
Most big game will have been taken by then so the greater problem is man and the very smallest game, which drops bigger guns out of the running.
For the sake of argument, I have a 45black powder Ruger revolver, for very close encounters.
So far as traps go, dad taught me how to make box traps in which anything can be caught humanely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
I think you are missing a great deal about traps and trapping.

A couple dozen steel foothold traps will hold a small to large animals and last for many decades if constant use. I still own some of the long spring and coil spring traps I bought with my fur checks in the late 1960s and 70s. I just retired my first Conibears purchased in 1976, because the trigger wires came loose.

You can add swivels to your cable snares. This will help prolong their life, but if you dont catch a coyote by the neck, they will still twist them up. So unless you are just snaring rabbits, the cable used for snaring is a consumable. I bought 500' of cable last summer.

Here is a list of steel traps available today:

The Weasel Trap The Number 0 long spring (3 1/2" Width) is the smallest size of steel foothold trap, and is intended for such small animals like Pine Martens, Squirrels, Rats, and Weasels. If the spring is of fair strength as is in the higher grades they may also be used for muskrat. They are used extensively by marten trappers in Alaska and the Rocky Mtns.

The Muskrat Trap The Number 1 long spring (3 1/2" Width) is known as the muskrat trap and is the best size for this animal. It is available as a stop loss or with double jaws to prevent twist offs. It is also used for Mink, Possum, Rabbits, Skunk, Squirrel, and Woodchuck.

The Mink Trap The Number 1 ½ coil spring (4 7/8" Width) is a very popular trap and their size and strength adapt them for general use in water sets. Known as the Mink trap, it is also used for Fox, Muskrat, Opossum, Raccoon and Skunk, and similar animals.

The Fox Trap The Bridger Number 1 3/4 coil spring (5 1/8" Width) was designed in response to the range expantion of Coyotes to farm country. It offers a reinforced frame, center mounted chain, offset jaws, and can be fitted with extra coil springs. Designed for Fox, Mink, and Raccoon, the larger size and strengh also makes it suitable for Badger, Bobcat, and Coyote.

The Coyote Trap The Number 2 coil spring (5 1/2" Width) round jaw was designed as a dry land predator trap. It has a strong frame and jaws, and is wide and strong enough to handle the large feet of Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, Fisher, and Red Fox.

The MB 550 RC coil spring is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. The heavy offset cast jaws have the same (5 1/2") jaw width as the #2 coil and a greater jaw length (6 1/4"). This allows the use of an oversized Paws I Trip Pan and a night latched dog. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The amount of pan force needed to trigger the MB 550 can be easily adjusted by bending the dog, making this trap suited for Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, Fisher, Fox, and Raccoon.

The Otter Trap The Victor Number 3 coil spring (5 7/8" Width) has been named the Otter trap, and it is the proper size to use for this animal. Like the MB 550, the jaws are longer than they are wide and this allows room for an oversized pan. It is available with forged offset jaws, a center mounted chain, and four coil springs. It is also well suited for Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, and Fisher: and other dry land predators.
The Sleepy Creek Number 3 double long spring (6" Width) is a widely used as a late season Bobcat and Coyote trap. It is the proper size and it's spring design allows it to function under freeze/thaw conditions. It is a very strong trap, and is suited for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, and Otter.

The Beaver Trap The Bridger/Northwoods (B/NW) Number 3 Coil Spring (6 1/2" Width) have reinforced base plates, a center mounted chain, crush proof swivels, and is available with offset jaws, and two additional coil springs. They are widely used for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, and Otter, and are strong enough for Panther and Wolves.
The MB Alpha #3 coil spring is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. The heavy offset cast jaws have the same jaw width as the MB 550. This trap uses a new dogless pan system. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The size and rugged construction of this trap makes it suited for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, Lynx, Otter, Panther, and Wolves.

The Wolf Trap The MB 750 Wolf coil spring (7 1/2" Width) is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. it features heavy offset jaws and a special dogless pan system that locks down both jaws. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The size and rugged construction of this trap makes it one of the premier traps for Panther, and Wolves.

Body Grip Traps: A third type of trap, the body grip, was designed by a Canadian man named Frank Conibear. It is a open square frame of heavy steel rods and is designed to capture the target animal by clamping down using a scissor action on the body, neck, and the head, effectively killing the animal out right. These traps are favored for water sets and will capture a swimming animal.

These Conibear traps were first produced and marketed by the Onieda Victor company and Victor brand body grip traps still bear the name of the original designer. Body grip traps produced by other companies are also commonly called Conibears, as a testimony to the genius of the original design.

Body grip traps sizes range from the Number 110 to Number 330. Number 110 (4.5" x 4.5") Marten, Mink, Muskrat, Opossum, Rabbit, Skunk, Squirrel, Large Fish. Number 150 (5" x 5") Mink, Muskrat, Nutria, Opossum, Rabbit, Raccoon, Skunk. Number 160 (6" x 6") double spring, Fisher, Nutria, Opossum, Raccoon, Skunk Number 220 (7" x 7") double spring, Badger, Bobcat, Fisher, Otter, Raccoon. Number 280 (8" x 8") double spring, Beaver, Lynx, Otter, Wolverene. Number 330 (10" x 10") double spring, Beaver, Lynx, Otter, Wolverene.

Dog Proof Raccoon Traps: This is a new category of steel trap featuring a fully enclosed trigger. It is designed to take advantage of the raccoon's tendency to reach into holes and pull out food items. But since domestic dogs lack this ability, it is almost completely dog proof. A wide variety of these trap designs are being developed and marketed. Most of them resemble a metal pipe or a discarded metal can.

** Dagger - Overall design of the ** Dagger is okay. I am not particularly fond of how the jaw of the trap is exposed on half of the trap. This is location specific for me but my issue was with the angle stake on the trap I had a hard time getting the trap bedded firmly in the hard clay that we have in North Georgia.

Freedom Brand FB1 - I LOVE how easy this trap is to set. Just squeeze the solid plate in to the body of the trap and "click" its set. The only problem is, with the ease of setting comes some slightly more complicated mechanical features that need to be attended to. I wondered why I was having the trap cleaned out but not making any catches. Turns out these traps may need a little tweaking to get them to fire correctly. The good thing about them is that with a little adjusting they can be made to fire very easily, Clint Locklear has a great video on how to adjust these traps.

Z-Trap - By far my favorite dog proof trap that I tested last season. These traps are very similar in design to the Dukes. I like the spike stake, I'm not real crazy about the circle on the stake, but I imagine if you are setting them in soft ground that helps stabilize the trap. These are simple traps, there is no tweaking or adjusting, and my favorite feature is on the trigger. Where the trigger meets the dog on most traps everything is square, but on these traps the trigger portion is round. Such a genius, yet simple idea. That makes the trap so much easier to fire than if it were squared off. But its not so easy that you have a hair trigger trap that fires without even being touched.
Thank you for the input. I was sort of assuming (wrongly) that most people were familiar with traps. I was also targeting the most common small game (rabbit and squirrel).
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
I think you are missing a great deal about traps and trapping.

A couple dozen steel foothold traps will hold a small to large animals and last for many decades if constant use. I still own some of the long spring and coil spring traps I bought with my fur checks in the late 1960s and 70s. I just retired my first Conibears purchased in 1976, because the trigger wires came loose.

You can add swivels to your cable snares. This will help prolong their life, but if you dont catch a coyote by the neck, they will still twist them up. So unless you are just snaring rabbits, the cable used for snaring is a consumable. I bought 500' of cable last summer.

Here is a list of steel traps available today:

The Weasel Trap The Number 0 long spring (3 1/2" Width) is the smallest size of steel foothold trap, and is intended for such small animals like Pine Martens, Squirrels, Rats, and Weasels. If the spring is of fair strength as is in the higher grades they may also be used for muskrat. They are used extensively by marten trappers in Alaska and the Rocky Mtns.

The Muskrat Trap The Number 1 long spring (3 1/2" Width) is known as the muskrat trap and is the best size for this animal. It is available as a stop loss or with double jaws to prevent twist offs. It is also used for Mink, Possum, Rabbits, Skunk, Squirrel, and Woodchuck.

The Mink Trap The Number 1 ½ coil spring (4 7/8" Width) is a very popular trap and their size and strength adapt them for general use in water sets. Known as the Mink trap, it is also used for Fox, Muskrat, Opossum, Raccoon and Skunk, and similar animals.

The Fox Trap The Bridger Number 1 3/4 coil spring (5 1/8" Width) was designed in response to the range expantion of Coyotes to farm country. It offers a reinforced frame, center mounted chain, offset jaws, and can be fitted with extra coil springs. Designed for Fox, Mink, and Raccoon, the larger size and strengh also makes it suitable for Badger, Bobcat, and Coyote.

The Coyote Trap The Number 2 coil spring (5 1/2" Width) round jaw was designed as a dry land predator trap. It has a strong frame and jaws, and is wide and strong enough to handle the large feet of Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, Fisher, and Red Fox.

The MB 550 RC coil spring is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. The heavy offset cast jaws have the same (5 1/2") jaw width as the #2 coil and a greater jaw length (6 1/4"). This allows the use of an oversized Paws I Trip Pan and a night latched dog. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The amount of pan force needed to trigger the MB 550 can be easily adjusted by bending the dog, making this trap suited for Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, Fisher, Fox, and Raccoon.

The Otter Trap The Victor Number 3 coil spring (5 7/8" Width) has been named the Otter trap, and it is the proper size to use for this animal. Like the MB 550, the jaws are longer than they are wide and this allows room for an oversized pan. It is available with forged offset jaws, a center mounted chain, and four coil springs. It is also well suited for Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, and Fisher: and other dry land predators.
The Sleepy Creek Number 3 double long spring (6" Width) is a widely used as a late season Bobcat and Coyote trap. It is the proper size and it's spring design allows it to function under freeze/thaw conditions. It is a very strong trap, and is suited for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, and Otter.

The Beaver Trap The Bridger/Northwoods (B/NW) Number 3 Coil Spring (6 1/2" Width) have reinforced base plates, a center mounted chain, crush proof swivels, and is available with offset jaws, and two additional coil springs. They are widely used for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, and Otter, and are strong enough for Panther and Wolves.
The MB Alpha #3 coil spring is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. The heavy offset cast jaws have the same jaw width as the MB 550. This trap uses a new dogless pan system. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The size and rugged construction of this trap makes it suited for Beaver, Bobcat, Coyote, Lynx, Otter, Panther, and Wolves.

The Wolf Trap The MB 750 Wolf coil spring (7 1/2" Width) is a new trap designed by Minnesota Trapline Products. it features heavy offset jaws and a special dogless pan system that locks down both jaws. The frame is double thickness and fitted with a center mounted chain, and crunch proof swivels. The size and rugged construction of this trap makes it one of the premier traps for Panther, and Wolves.

Body Grip Traps: A third type of trap, the body grip, was designed by a Canadian man named Frank Conibear. It is a open square frame of heavy steel rods and is designed to capture the target animal by clamping down using a scissor action on the body, neck, and the head, effectively killing the animal out right. These traps are favored for water sets and will capture a swimming animal.

These Conibear traps were first produced and marketed by the Onieda Victor company and Victor brand body grip traps still bear the name of the original designer. Body grip traps produced by other companies are also commonly called Conibears, as a testimony to the genius of the original design.

Body grip traps sizes range from the Number 110 to Number 330. Number 110 (4.5" x 4.5") Marten, Mink, Muskrat, Opossum, Rabbit, Skunk, Squirrel, Large Fish. Number 150 (5" x 5") Mink, Muskrat, Nutria, Opossum, Rabbit, Raccoon, Skunk. Number 160 (6" x 6") double spring, Fisher, Nutria, Opossum, Raccoon, Skunk Number 220 (7" x 7") double spring, Badger, Bobcat, Fisher, Otter, Raccoon. Number 280 (8" x 8") double spring, Beaver, Lynx, Otter, Wolverene. Number 330 (10" x 10") double spring, Beaver, Lynx, Otter, Wolverene.

Dog Proof Raccoon Traps: This is a new category of steel trap featuring a fully enclosed trigger. It is designed to take advantage of the raccoon's tendency to reach into holes and pull out food items. But since domestic dogs lack this ability, it is almost completely dog proof. A wide variety of these trap designs are being developed and marketed. Most of them resemble a metal pipe or a discarded metal can.

** Dagger - Overall design of the ** Dagger is okay. I am not particularly fond of how the jaw of the trap is exposed on half of the trap. This is location specific for me but my issue was with the angle stake on the trap I had a hard time getting the trap bedded firmly in the hard clay that we have in North Georgia.

Freedom Brand FB1 - I LOVE how easy this trap is to set. Just squeeze the solid plate in to the body of the trap and "click" its set. The only problem is, with the ease of setting comes some slightly more complicated mechanical features that need to be attended to. I wondered why I was having the trap cleaned out but not making any catches. Turns out these traps may need a little tweaking to get them to fire correctly. The good thing about them is that with a little adjusting they can be made to fire very easily, Clint Locklear has a great video on how to adjust these traps.

Z-Trap - By far my favorite dog proof trap that I tested last season. These traps are very similar in design to the Dukes. I like the spike stake, I'm not real crazy about the circle on the stake, but I imagine if you are setting them in soft ground that helps stabilize the trap. These are simple traps, there is no tweaking or adjusting, and my favorite feature is on the trigger. Where the trigger meets the dog on most traps everything is square, but on these traps the trigger portion is round. Such a genius, yet simple idea. That makes the trap so much easier to fire than if it were squared off. But its not so easy that you have a hair trigger trap that fires without even being touched.
I have used the Dog Proof Raccoon Traps myself. I bait with coke syrup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
This is really a paw trap. I leave them unset around the chicken coop with bait. Like I do with my live traps. Once I notice the bait is missing a few times I set the trap. These are easy to hide in leaves and such. Remember it is a paw trap and the raccoon will be pissed!!! So you have to dispatch them in a safe manner ASAP. Most come with a tool you will need to set and/or open the trap.

If you are eating raccoon some prefer the live trap so you can feed them for a few weeks to clean them out. Raccoon was once common in restaurants in parts of the USA. Have to practice hygiene due to raccoon round worm. Baylisascaris infection is caused by a roundworm found in raccoons. This roundworm can infect people as well as a variety of other animals, including dogs.

Despite the enthusiasm many American raccoon-eaters have for the taste of barbecued raccoon meat, it was actually certain Native-American tribes that first demonstrated their culinary talents for raccoon preparation. In fact it is surprisingly legal to capture and serve raccoon meat to people in restaurants.

As Luke Fater reports for Atlas Obscura, Native Americans and early American settlers relied on small game like raccoon and squirrels to supplement their diets. In the American South especially, raccoons were an important staple for enslaved individuals.
 

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A few 100mround could last a long time hunting deer/ bear .
I have reloadable 12 gauge and 20 gauge mag tech brass shells
I can shoot them in definitely
thousands of 22lr they can gather lots of meat .
I buy 6 boxes of Remington corlock for hunting every time I buy a rifle and I have 3/4 boxes left for all of them .
I reload 308 /22/250 45/70 and 30/30
I have lots of pistol ammo .
My go to food getter is a 30/30 20g savage v24 OU

l think a 357 lever action is a good all round , carry lots of ammo type gun
I will get one if the price comes down
 

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A few 100mround could last a long time hunting deer/ bear .
I have reloadable 12 gauge and 20 gauge mag tech brass shells
I can shoot them in definitely
thousands of 22lr they can gather lots of meat .
I buy 6 boxes of Remington corlock for hunting every time I buy a rifle and I have 3/4 boxes left for all of them .
I reload 308 /22/250 45/70 and 30/30
I have lots of pistol ammo .
My go to food getter is a 30/30 20g savage v24 OU

l think a 357 lever action is a good all round , carry lots of ammo type gun
I will get one if the price comes down
I have some brass 12 and 28 gauge shells but never loaded them. Mind a quick explanation on how you do it?
 

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for most I really don't think running out of ammo will be their first major obstacle, it will be that if feeding the masses with game and critters, most game populations will be decimated long long before running out of hunting ammo becomes even a remote concern.
 

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I use black power , pyrodex works good but I would split a case every 1 in 100 loads
I mostly use 11/8 oz dipper for powder or pyrodex the same charge for both .
They get primed with a regular primer can’t recall the size ? It could be a shot gun primer ?
I load a bunch at a time . I first use my oak block with 2 holes drilled in it , one to hold the shell and one so the old primer drops in to it , Clean them in a pot of hot water and soap with a brush and let them dry .
Once clean I could load them or run them thru a vibrator st make them shine .
Then prime them with a oak dowel that just fits in the case on the oak block .
Now take out your power and charge the shells ( seal up your powder and dont have any powder out while loading i use a glass measuring cup to spoon the powder out .
Run the dipper thru the powder the same way every time , don’t pack it , I just tap the shells on the table a few times to settle it .
I use 2 circle fly over shot cards , then circle fly fiber wads and shot.
Adjust the shot column to fill the case 3/16 from the top.
Add a over shot card to hold in the 11/8 oz of shot.
You can seal with water glass , tight bond water proof wood glue ,
Elmer’s glue , candle wax .
The wax work good if it’s cool and you don’t have to clean a ring on the case .
I tap the shell and compress the all the ingredients as I load with even pressure
glue holds better for hunting your shot column need to stay tight or you could have a. Explosion☹ .
When I load a batch I shoot 2 rounds out of the same barrel with a shell in the other chamber
just to make sure the recoil dosent move the load . This is a old 12g my buddy shot smokeless loads out of it , but I just use the black powder loads I have other doubles also
he gave me this before he passed .

Cabinetry Wood Floor Flooring Drawer
 

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I’ve never ran into a problem with the brass , its lo low pressure.
I mostly use it in one gun , if I was shooting it in different guns it could be a problem if the chambers where different.
I try not to resize if I don’t have to , even my Rifle rounds don’t get full length sizing most of the time.
45 70 gets neck sized and crimped with taper crimp for single shot hi wall , sharps ,
lever actions get a heavy roll crimp.
 

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I have some brass 12 and 28 gauge shells but never loaded them. Mind a quick explanation on how you do it?
One other thing all brass / paper/ plastic shells have a diffrent inside diameter so you need to be careful with wad/card selection .
Mag tech shells are very thin , I’ve seen other manufactures that make the cases as thick as plastic Remington cases and you could use modern powder load recipes , I’ve never tried it
but it would be nice .
 

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I remember reading stories about cities during economic collapses or during times of war, there was not a cat or dog or pigeon to be seen, they ate everything! In a true SHTF it will be the same, even in the countryside the animal populations will be severely depleted. You'd have to be Waaaaay out to have a good ongoing supply of natural game I expect.
 

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I use black power , pyrodex works good but I would split a case every 1 in 100 loads
I mostly use 11/8 oz dipper for powder or pyrodex the same charge for both .
They get primed with a regular primer can’t recall the size ? It could be a shot gun primer ?
I load a bunch at a time . I first use my oak block with 2 holes drilled in it , one to hold the shell and one so the old primer drops in to it , Clean them in a pot of hot water and soap with a brush and let them dry .
Once clean I could load them or run them thru a vibrator st make them shine .
Then prime them with a oak dowel that just fits in the case on the oak block .
Now take out your power and charge the shells ( seal up your powder and dont have any powder out while loading i use a glass measuring cup to spoon the powder out .
Run the dipper thru the powder the same way every time , don’t pack it , I just tap the shells on the table a few times to settle it .
I use 2 circle fly over shot cards , then circle fly fiber wads and shot.
Adjust the shot column to fill the case 3/16 from the top.
Add a over shot card to hold in the 11/8 oz of shot.
You can seal with water glass , tight bond water proof wood glue ,
Elmer’s glue , candle wax .
The wax work good if it’s cool and you don’t have to clean a ring on the case .
I tap the shell and compress the all the ingredients as I load with even pressure
glue holds better for hunting your shot column need to stay tight or you could have a. Explosion☹ .
When I load a batch I shoot 2 rounds out of the same barrel with a shell in the other chamber
just to make sure the recoil dosent move the load . This is a old 12g my buddy shot smokeless loads out of it , but I just use the black powder loads I have other doubles also
he gave me this before he passed .

View attachment 398363
Cool write up - could you post a pic of the priming setup? I assuming depriming is done with a pin punch?
 

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This is really a paw trap. I leave them unset around the chicken coop with bait. Like I do with my live traps. Once I notice the bait is missing a few times I set the trap. These are easy to hide in leaves and such. Remember it is a paw trap and the raccoon will be pissed!!! So you have to dispatch them in a safe manner ASAP. Most come with a tool you will need to set and/or open the trap.

If you are eating raccoon some prefer the live trap so you can feed them for a few weeks to clean them out. Raccoon was once common in restaurants in parts of the USA. Have to practice hygiene due to raccoon round worm. Baylisascaris infection is caused by a roundworm found in raccoons. This roundworm can infect people as well as a variety of other animals, including dogs.

Despite the enthusiasm many American raccoon-eaters have for the taste of barbecued raccoon meat, it was actually certain Native-American tribes that first demonstrated their culinary talents for raccoon preparation. In fact it is surprisingly legal to capture and serve raccoon meat to people in restaurants.

As Luke Fater reports for Atlas Obscura, Native Americans and early American settlers relied on small game like raccoon and squirrels to supplement their diets. In the American South especially, raccoons were an important staple for enslaved individuals.
There was a guy here in houston selling raccoon meat BBQ out of a store front. He was also selling moonshine , OXY , weed and an assortment of other drugs. It was “peak libertarian”.

I have also seen a guy in homestead selling raccoon BBQ out of pickup.
 

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1) I don't think anyone has said that trapping will be their sole source of food. If someone did, I missed it in this thread.
2) You are correct that one needs to have plenty of other options available to put food on the table.
3) Your premise that there will be nothing left to hunt or fish is probably correct for the vast majority of the world population. But not for everyone. There are still places where few humans tread and wildlife is abundant. Take the sportsman who fly in to bag game out of the equation and the herds will explode to pre-western contact level.

Nothing left to hunt ? I doubt it. Commercial hunting is what caused the deer population to fall , not the depression.

Also what is gonna cause SHTF and kill all the cows but leave the people ? I don’t see anybody hunting deer when cows and horses are walking around. And I don’t see many scenarios that reduce food availability without killing people other than an economic collapse , which will not last that long. How long did Russia’s take ?
 

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Rat traps are great for tree rats!!!
Pressure cooker squirrel is simple to make at home, in an old-school stovetop pressure cooker or in a countertop electric pressure cooker (instant pot).
I grew up on tree rats, and rabbit. Sun fish and perch. I do wish to know if fresh water clams in New England are edible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
I grew up on tree rats, and rabbit. Sun fish and perch. I do wish to know if fresh water clams in New England are edible.
Freshwater mussels are edible, too, but preparation and cooking is required. ... There are some 300 native species in North America, seven west of the Continental Divide, none in Hawaii though the later has one invasive species, the Asian Clam, which is a mussel.
 
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