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But why a baldric rig for a 22 ounce Busse Battlesaw chopper, and not for a 40 ounce 1911 auto empty? Knives are always much lighter than any handgun... The 10" Lile Rambo "Mission" weights the same as an empty SW J frame 5 shot .38 that's often seen as an ankle holster back up...

That being said, I am revising my opinion of Hollow Grinds after much testing...: This is for reasons that are... Complicated...: I've found that using a Hollow Grind while chopping probably leads to a faster continuous micro-burr, even with correct use without any side loads: I think the thinner edge of a Hollow Grind hits "softer" into wood, but this also means the edge is less stable on entry, and this leads to a faster "burr" formation, caused by a less steady course of the edge inside the wood at the moment of impact. Full Flat Grinds are more resistant to this "burr" because the constant "widening" of the blade stabilizes it more as it penetrates: It runs straighter into the wood... I don't like Convex Grinds for multiple reasons, but they would, in theory, have the same advantage as Full Flat Grinds (along with less sticking, but at the unacceptable cost -for me- of being duller generally: I won't go into that).

This has to be tempered by FFGs, in my other observations, being less tolerant at the edge of accidentally applying side loads, because the "shoulders" of the edge are less "prominent" on FFGs, for the same edge angle, than on Hollow Grinds. Prominent "shoulders" take the lateral load off the apex more, reducing gross apex warping... For similar reasons, comparably thin convex edges also suffer more from side loads: Here my INFI Busse Battlesaw at around 15 dps final, very mild use:

View attachment 377765

So microscopic apex burr from normal "competent" chopping: Flat Grinds better.
Accidental side loads while carelessly twisting knife: Less major edge apex warping for Hollow Grinds, due to the more acute/prominent edge shoulders taking the load away from the apex.

Combining a Full Flat Grind and 420J improves "normal" (no accidental side-twist) edge holding when chopping, because 420J loses its micro-apex faster, so there is no "burr" to bend and make a "lever" for a higher and higher bend on the rest of the edge, acting like a microlever to keep warping the edge more and more for each hit. Plus, the Full Flat Grind also runs into the wood straighter! This explains why FFG profiles in Taiwanese 420J seemed to hold up so well, being reluctant to make that continuous misaligned bent "lip" that gets taller and taller with each hit.

However, if I mishandled the 420J FFG knife, and put side loads on it, then the apex would fare worse than a similar Hollow Grind. This due both to the softer 420J steel and the lesser edge shoulders of a FFG. It is complicated, but I hope it makes sense.
Gaton, what angle did you give it there? seems like it fold all over the edge like paper! cant remember ever seeing that with any knife.
 

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Gaton, what angle did you give it there? seems like it fold all over the edge like paper! cant remember ever seeing that with any knife.
That Battlesaw was a convex and wasn't even that sharp... I have far thinner knives, that suffer no damage from the same wood chopping work: This Battlesaw would barely slice meat, and had a final apex angle that was at least 15 dps. However 15 dps on a convex is weak because a convex edge gets "pinched" by the wood closer to the edge. 15 dps on a Full Flat Grind V-edge is stronger than 15 dps on a Convex. 15 dps on a Hollow Sabre Grind is stronger than 15 dps on a Full Flat Grind V-edge... The knife just below is a 12 dps Full Flat Grind V-edge(!) in 5160, and has suffered no damage from far more work than the Battlesaw.

With hardly any change in appearance, the knife was later opened to 20 dps, but to me 20 dps is just dull: It is after all a 40 degree inclusive wedge... Half of a square corner practically...

I would say the failure in the photo is 50% due to the Convex Grind, always weaker at the same angle than a V-edge, and 50% due to the INFI steel. Maybe it would work better at 20 dps, but if another knife can take even 12 dps, why bother?

The behaviour of grind types vary considerably. If we assume all edge bases as 0.020" (the Busse above was thicker than the knife below, at the same height for height distance from the apex), the hollow grind at 15 dps will take more accidental twisting and rolling without curling the edge in severe localised "spots". This is because the Hollow Grind makes the V-Edge shoulders "stick out" more, which protects the weaker edge apex from the "wood pinching". But the Full Flat Grind is better at preventing micro-edge rolling when chopping, because it enters the wood and "stays straighter" as it sinks into the wood. I used to prefer the greater tolerance of Hollow Grinds to lateral twisting, but I now prefer the better edge holding (or lack of micro-burr forming) of Full Flat Grinds with separate V-edges. Yes the grind type greatly affects the edge-holding... For chopping purposes, the convex on knives is not great, but it does share the FFG "no micro apex-rolling" advantage, without the tendency to stick. But equally sharp Convex (at the apex) is always weaker to twisting... The Convex just adds metal exactly where you try to remove it when you sharpen, if it is going to be strong enough, and then this added metal gives the wood more "hold" to twist it, so it has to be even thicker still...
 

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If I was planning on going in to the woods, or up against a foe or wild animal, I'd carry at least 2 or 3 knives because one knife isn't capable of doing everything.
You're preaching to the choir! My only addition is that you can do just about "everything" with one knife, it most certainly won't be very efficient at some tasks. I've seen a folder used to "chop" a tree down and I've personally scaled and gutted hand-sized pan fish with a kukri. Neither are the optimum tool for the job, but the skill of the user/problem solver can make it work, even if it's not the most efficient.

It always comes down to matching skill and experience with how much weight do you want to carry for a collection of more efficient tools. I think most of us could list what we would like to have and what would be our minimum choices for maximum utility, versatility, and efficiency.

ROCK6
 

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Survival knife has multiple meanings these days. You have the knife making industry catagory of the Survival knife which just means that one tool option to do all you needs of a knife whether its chop cut carve skin or process wood. Then you have he real life meaning of a survival knife which is the knife you have on you at a time when a survival situation arises.Two very different things.
 

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As others have said, the term always makes me think of the hollow handle ones so popular in the 80's. First piece of prepper equipment I bought with my own money was one. Still have it. Still works....

Now the term means to me a knife I would be ok with taking into the wild as my "only knife".
 
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I agree Writer's Block. My original post years ago I listed the Cold Steel Oda knife (A close copy of the Randall Made R-1. I had and still have two) as that type of knife. The one, that if I had no other knife, I would want with me in the field. That has changed now. Partly because the Oda is no longer in production, and the Ontario Knife Company OKC-3S US Marine Issue bayonet is. It fulfills the same functions as the Oda, plus a couple more. It does those better than the Oda, though the Odas still do a couple of things better than the OKC-3S, though the OKC-3S does do a few of the things the Oda does better than the Oda does.

The Odas are in additional first-line kits because they are as good as they are and I certainly still trust them to do what I need to do, if they were the only knife I had with me in the field.

Just my opinion.
 
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