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My garden was a 100% failure this year due to the odd weather we had here in the south at the beginning of summer. Too much rain and my entire garden was flooded for 7+ days which killed everything but the weeds. Disgruntled I've mowed the whole thing and am preparing to begin again with all raised beds and also plan to use the square foot gardening method since I'm only growing for myself.

My question is this, how can I find out what to grow when in my area? I have a farmer's almanac but it isn't near as helpful as I remember it being in the 80's, it looks as if it has sold out to 90% advertising / 10% info. I've scoured the internet and still haven't found a good source for this information. Does anyone have any good suggestions on where I could find this info? As it stands the only thing I seem to be able to grow is Polk (Poke) Salad......

Thanks in advance for any help!
 

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Never Abducted
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You could try some bush beans, cukes, zucchini. If you can find any tomato plants at a nursery, I think you might still have time. Try and find a website for a university or agricultural school in your state or area. These are often good sources of information.Good luck, have fun, and don't give up. It's all a learning experience.
 

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Prepared Firebird
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Welcome to the world of gardening. Bad years do happen. Unfortunately.

This is why the old-timers (in your grandparents' generation and earlier) canned, preserved, dried, hunted, and otherwise squirreled up every food item they could get their hands on. They were prepping, before prepping even had a label. Because they knew from experience that the bad harvest years would come along with sickening regularity. Drought, blistering heat, insects, plant diseases, hail, and excess rain are always waiting in the wings to stage a repeat visit.

As others have said, you might still be able to get some sort of harvest by buying started plants from a nursery or garden center. And, next year, don't put all your eggs in one basket. Stagger your plantings at one or two-week intervals, using just part of your seeds at a time.

Also, since you are only growing for one person, I would seriously consider the option of also doing at least a small amount of container gardening. If you have some of your veggies, etc. in containers, you won't be wiped out by a loss of your outdoor plantings in the ground. The nice thing about pots is that you can move them inside if the weather doesn't cooperate. Buy some of those nifty plant saucers on wheels for the containers. Then, you can roll them around, easily, to wherever you want them to be.
 

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Weed 'em and reap
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My garden was a 100% failure this year due to the odd weather we had here in the south at the beginning of summer. Too much rain and my entire garden was flooded for 7+ days which killed everything but the weeds. Disgruntled I've mowed the whole thing and am preparing to begin again with all raised beds and also plan to use the square foot gardening method since I'm only growing for myself.

My question is this, how can I find out what to grow when in my area? I have a farmer's almanac but it isn't near as helpful as I remember it being in the 80's, it looks as if it has sold out to 90% advertising / 10% info. I've scoured the internet and still haven't found a good source for this information. Does anyone have any good suggestions on where I could find this info? As it stands the only thing I seem to be able to grow is Polk (Poke) Salad......

Thanks in advance for any help!
Most people out there only garden in the summer, but spring and fall are at least as important, if not more. Anyone can grow food in the summer, and the stores all sell started plants and a variety of gadgets, knick-knacks, and other money wasting crap that makes people pay a lot of money for the privilege of doing work.

Do remember that the garden is a "time-share" for plants, not a "summer vacation home".

You should be planting lettuce and other greens, peas, etc, as soon as the soil can be worked. Even earlier if you start them in a cold frame.

Start your summer veg 6-10 weeks before last frost.

At midsummer, plant your fall crops like broccoli, which can be harvested fresh from the garden straight up through November or december where you live.

The key is that most fall/winter crops don't start or grow when it gets cold, they just hang out and survive, waiting to be picked fresh. A cold frame will extend the season a few weeks on either end. In a high tunnel, you can eat fresh year-round. There is a guy in Maine named Eliot Coleman who wrote a few books about how he eats all winter from an unheated greenhouse.
 

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Just the facts, Ma'am.
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Disgruntled I've mowed the whole thing and am preparing to begin again with all raised beds and also plan to use the square foot gardening method since I'm only growing for myself.

My question is this, how can I find out what to grow when in my area?
I was going to direct you to the Square Foot Gardening book. Mel has a chart in it (at least in the new book) that shows when and if it is from seed or transplant. All you need to know is your first frost date and your last frost date. But that Burpee link someone posted is awesome!
 

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Farming is always a gamble, your raised beds will help with the water problem you had,
remember the dates on all the charts are only a guide, I use a thermometer and go by soil temp, I don't care what the calender says if the ground is too cold don't plant. your seeds won't germinate and rot if the ground is too cold, you are better off planting a week late than a week too early, and nothing says you have to plant all at once, if you are planting 9 tomatoes, you can do 3 a week for 3 weeks. your zone is also just a guide a few miles can make a big difference, are you on top of the hill or the bottom, north side or south, talk to growers in your area, they would know best. good luck.
 

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what to grow

My garden was a 100% failure this year due to the odd weather we had here in the south at the beginning of summer. Too much rain and my entire garden was flooded for 7+ days which killed everything but the weeds. Disgruntled I've mowed the whole thing and am preparing to begin again with all raised beds and also plan to use the square foot gardening method since I'm only growing for myself.

My question is this, how can I find out what to grow when in my area? I have a farmer's almanac but it isn't near as helpful as I remember it being in the 80's, it looks as if it has sold out to 90% advertising / 10% info. I've scoured the internet and still haven't found a good source for this information. Does anyone have any good suggestions on where I could find this info? As it stands the only thing I seem to be able to grow is Polk (Poke) Salad......

Thanks in advance for any help!
I used to live in the Pinson Valley(North Central) area of Alabama,I don't know where you are in relation to there. But the one thing I know is that if I planted my garden before Good Friday it was a failure, either frost or spring rain took it out.As for what vegetables to plant. Check with the folks at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens,they have some master gardener folks that can give you a lot of info.Also check and find out what your local Talk-Radio station is. There is a couple of Gardening shows that come on Saturday Mornings.that you can call in and get info.
Here is what I did and had good results.
I would plow/till up my ground about 2 weeks before Good Friday,put out my Garden Lime, then a week later I would set my rows and get my hills for squash and cucumbers ready.then in another week I would put down my granulated fertilizer in the rows and hills (wet it down good)most of the time the rain wet it for me.Then the week following Good Friday I would relay my rows(if the rain) did any damage and plant.As for what to plant I planted Tomatoes,Yellow Squash,Green Squash,Purple Hull Peas,Cucumbers,Bell Peppers.Okra,Eggplants,Radishes,carrots,pumpkins,Pole Beans,The list could go on.But you get the idea of the variety.But it isn't too late to start getting ready for a Fall garden,In fact at the end of August if you have your plot ready,would be a good time for winter onions, cabbage,Broccoli, potatoes,parsnips collard/turnip/mustard greens.Good Luck:thumb:

No White Flags Above My Door
Daveeds


PS: As dumb as this may sound one year I had a flooding problem,What I did was use a set of post hole diggers and dug some deep holes in between the rows to allow the water to move away from the plants.it seemed to help.
 

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I lost all my corn to the heat, they're in the shade half the day too:xeye: Also had some watermelons bust because of the rain. If I didn't have pesticide, I would've lost the tomatoes to caterpillars.

First year of gardening was rough lol.
 
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