Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been in the process of making multiple bags, 72 hour bag, general survival buttpack for hikes, etc, a rubbermade tote with supplies for leaving in a car, basic bags for both of my vehicles, also some small amounts being saved for prepping for saying in my house in an emergency. This is a large amount of gear and food, and can get confusing. I have 2 questions, for those that have multiple bags, do you have a system of keeping everything organized, keeping the right items in the right packs, etc. Also, how do you know if your getting to the point where your pretty much set to go and anything else would really be a waste of money, until you use it and have to replace. There is just so much stuff out there that could be considered a bob, or survival item...you could spend a fortune.(And Im not even talking about long term prepping which is its own subject all together). I am investigating respirators and crowbars now which I never thought about until I read something on line...it seems like the more I read, the more I want to add, thus the more money I spend. I know everyone customizes things to their own needs but when is enough enough??I want to be properly prepared, but dont want to go broke.
 

·
Wendigo244
Joined
·
103 Posts
That might be the best question I have seen posted on this site.

I think there are two ways to look at that.

1. There really is no overkill. <<< (note the period) If something huge ever did go down where you needed absolutely everything you have just to survive you would find that the lint in you clothes dryer has value. Everything that you had from that point in time on would be considered a non renewable resource. And with that being said, it would always be better to have more.

However..

The flip side to that coin would say, Have only what you need to survive. Leaves less to lose, break , be stolen, have parts for, or more importantly just not be there when you have come to count on it. (I.E. Have A box of lighters/matches but no flint/firesteel. Have 3 radios, 6 flashlights and a box of batteries and not one crank style of either. Have 5 different guns with 200 rounds each, instead of 2 guns with 5000 rounds each... I'm sure you see what i'm getting at.

I think it all comes down to what kind of a lifestyle you Choose to live should life as you know it change so dramatically that the world you knew is no longer recognizable. Would you have to move, keep moving? Stay where yo are? can you take it with you? Would you ultimatley be force to live without it any way? If so did you need it to begin with?

Not much of an answer I know,
But if you want my personal opnion, I read about too much Gimmicky crap that people on this site feel they must have. A tack vest for each gun, a different water filter for each bag, 6 different knives to do the same thing... And the vast majority of it still sparkels without so much as a frayed thread of a sploch of ground in dirt.

So my opnion... Have what ya need, know it works, get out there and survive. Know you can... Don't think you can... because having alot of gear makes you overconfident. Survival happens more often the not when you have nothing.

Pardon my spelling.
 

·
... --- ...
Joined
·
14,874 Posts
My family has been discussing this,as well. On one hand, we don't want to have little or no cash around, having blown it all on canned goods and Silver Eagles, yet if some major calamity goes down, we're afraid to get stuck holding a bunch or worthless or devalued dollars. It's the old when-to-hold-'em,when-to-fold-'em conundrum.
One thing I've been doing for a while now, is building a stash of the vital comforts that I use daily, and wouldn't want to sacrifice. Buying while they're cheap, I've accumulated a healthy personal stash of my favorite deodorants, razors, shampoo,etc.
Another good way to kill two birds, so to speak, is buying and rotating gas. I keep 4 or 5 gas cans full, using and re-filling periodically.That way I stay prepped, but I'm not spending the money and just burying it in a closet.
Other than that, I guess it's just a gamble. But everytime I see the latest economic headlines, it re-enforces my belief that all this can't go on much longer, and I go buy another handful of Silver Eagles or case of canned goods.:D:
 

·
Just throw in an onion
Joined
·
163 Posts
As long as you keep your head and think before you buy I must agree with point one. There really is no overkill. <<< (note the period)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
So my opnion... Have what ya need, know it works, get out there and survive. Know you can... Don't think you can... because having alot of gear makes you overconfident. Survival happens more often the not when you have nothing.

Pardon my spelling.
Well said, Wendigo. Having a lot of gear/preps can make you let your guard down a bit. I have found that after a 'prep' shopping trip, I come home and have a contented feeling as I stock my shelves or add to the BOB. Then, I wake up the next day and read about South Dakota farmers and their lack of crops for 2009 or about people stampeding an employee to get the best bargain of the day at Wal-Mart. You always have to be alert and your quote reminded me to not be complacement- ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
That might be the best question I have seen posted on this site.

<SNIP>

I think it all comes down to what kind of a lifestyle you Choose to live should life as you know it change so dramatically that the world you knew is no longer recognizable. Would you have to move, keep moving? Stay where you are? can you take it with you? Would you ultimatley be force to live without it any way? If so did you need it to begin with?

Very well said. I think this is a great way to judge your contents and where you're spending your money. Perosnally, I know that if push comes to shove, I can give up some perks of modern life (computers, cell phones, internet, electricity, TV, etc.) but there are a few that I would miss (books, music). Whenever I go camping, I try to live on the simple things I bring with me. Granted thats only for a few days, but at least it gives me an idea if I'm missing something vital or if I'm overloading myself on the things I think I need. I usually find that I'm much happier with less stuff camping than when I come home to my "luxuries".

Also, I think as long as you keep rotating your stuff and using it, its not like you wasted money and just left the stuff to sit there and rot.
 

·
trois pour cent
Joined
·
5,942 Posts
Just keep your perspective.
Have a plan based on priorities.
And like the others said, make sure you are not wasting money on gimmicks. The basics are the most important.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
742 Posts
Here's how I look at it:

The probability of a actually experiencing a SHTF scenario is small --smaller than the probability of an expensive illness or an untimely death. Essentially, when you prep you're paying an insurance premium for a SHTF scenario. So price it accordingly. Maybe spend half as much on prepping as you spend on health or life insurance. And, set in advance your prepping goal so when you hit your goal you know it. I think something like $50 to $100 a month set aside for prepping is probably about right for the average person if you have the discipline to do it every month. And three years of saving is probably enough to make you more prepared than 99.99% of the people out there.
 

·
Super Moderator
Psalm 34:4
Joined
·
23,558 Posts
3 meals per day, per person for X amount of days.

if you have a family of 4 and you want to be sure they will survive for a year that's comes to.... 4380 meals. Even if you cut back to 1 meal a day for your family of 4 it comes to 1460 meals. That's a lot of canned goods. If your planning on long term survival you must have a large storage space for cans of food or learn to garden and hunt to supplement your preps.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
371 Posts
Basically, I ask myself This question: How much can I carry on my person? This whittles down my options significantly; therefore, I can buy Quality, and not look back.

I've procured or am procuring:

A tent for 2 (6lbs.), -20 degree sleeping bag, backpack (3lbs.).
Ka-Bar machete (5lbs.)
One-handed firesteel (in case I break my arm) x2 or with matches/10 bic lighters - 10,000 strikes will last me 30 years. Eventually I could learn to make fire like the Indians did. (1lbs.)
A quality metal pot or pan (4lbs.)
A quality water carrying bottle or pack (this is tricky - Do I Really need all the filtration/iodine crap? because, that stuff runs out or is tough to keep clean eventually). (2lbs.)
An A2 or S1 Fallkniven knife (4lbs.)
A small knife (2lbs.)
A multi-purpose knife (2lbs.)
Knife sharpener x2 (2lbs.)
600 ft. of parachord (4lbs.)
The warmest quality parka or clothes imaginable (10lbs.)
A Brunton mirrored compass (1lbs.)
All manner of easy-to-grow or preferable seeds. (1lbs.)


Anything else like a bow, gun, ammo, or fishing rod, would weigh me down or be awkward to carry beyond my tolerance.

It would be nice to carry a .44 magnum but a few boxes of ammo is soooo heavy. Which begs the question from my novice survival mind, How does one make gunpower from nature? If not that big a deal, then a Lee Loader might be a good investment here.

How exactly does one dehydrate/smoke/cure/preserve deer meat or other in nature?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just keep your perspective.
Have a plan based on priorities.
And like the others said, make sure you are not wasting money on gimmicks. The basics are the most important.
maybe it would be good to get a discussion going on some of the gimmicks out there. There are some companies out there that are selling absolute sheit, and although most on here are wise enough to filter the crap, some folks are not.
 

·
To secure peace is to...
Joined
·
4,194 Posts
To each his own.

I've set aside a small monthly budget for my gear. I will spend it, because it is small and would probably be wasted otherwise on something that won't help me survive at some point. Making some preparations are better than making none at all. Again, to each his own...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
If you invest all your money in physical goods you can't go wrong.
Say all your money went into the stuff you use everyday- clothes, food, ammo(train to win:)), car parts, tools, your home, water, etc. and you have no traditional investments. If you have everything paid off you will have everything you need to retire.
Compare food prices of ten years ago and stock prices of 10 years ago- Your investment would have been very wise.
Even if the markets are doing good you can't lose by investing in stuff.
Bypass Wall St and buy what you really need now. Good times bad times you win. 10,000 nails? The value will go up with commodities but when shtf you'll be the winner over someone who got gold, even more so than stocks.
 

·
.
Joined
·
531 Posts
I have 2 bags set up.

The BOB in my car. Has everything I need for 3 days of good survival, but could be extended to 7 days of reasonable survival if needed. Food, at least a reasonable shelter and water. It's as much equipment as I can fit in it and still keeping it fairly lightweight (25 pounds or under if I can) It's set for a quick GTFO now scenario where I don't think I'd be able to get home and get the rest of it or get stranded somewhere.

I also have a bag set up for having time to get home and pick it, the dog and the rest of the gear up. This one is more along the lines of long term or possibly never coming home again. It's got heavier gear, more clothes and extreme cold weather gear.

Honestly I think it's mostly personal preference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have 2 bags set up.

The BOB in my car. Has everything I need for 3 days of good survival, but could be extended to 7 days of reasonable survival if needed. Food, at least a reasonable shelter and water. It's as much equipment as I can fit in it and still keeping it fairly lightweight (25 pounds or under if I can) It's set for a quick GTFO now scenario where I don't think I'd be able to get home and get the rest of it or get stranded somewhere.

I also have a bag set up for having time to get home and pick it, the dog and the rest of the gear up. This one is more along the lines of long term or possibly never coming home again. It's got heavier gear, more clothes and extreme cold weather gear.

Honestly I think it's mostly personal preference.
mk can you give us a better idea of what you have in this bag??
 

·
.
Joined
·
531 Posts
mk can you give us a better idea of what you have in this bag??
Sure. As I said, this one is the bag where I don't care about weight as opposed to the BOB in my car. A lot of items I have in my BOB, but some are larger. Others just redundancy. You'll see those when I say extra or more. :D:

In it, I keep a

Hatchet
Small set of camp pots / pans
The 'large' knife (Cold Steel ODA)
Boots
Heavyweight poly long underwear
Balaclava / heavy knit hat / heavy gloves / heavy poly socks
Fleece pullover.
Folding shovel.
Another full bag of lint.
An extra set of ACU's.
Another bag of chemical lights.
3 1qt canteens.
An additional 100' of 550 paracord.
Soap / toiletpaper
Full size binoculars
Two 2.5 gallon collapsible water containers
Another waterproof container of matches.
Tactical vest
Nylon drop leg holster
More Long burning candles
Another much larger first aid kit.
A 3rd compass
More Wetfire tinder

That's all I can really think of at the moment. I have more I plan to add, which may require either a bigger bag or a second larger one. This current one I have is set up on a shelf so all I have to do is back the car in, up the trunk, dump it in and go. There are a few other things on the shelf as well. Tent, big container of dog food, 5 cases of MRE's etc.

The long term filled 5 gallon buckets of food are mostly all up at the BOL already.
 

·
I have nothing to say
Joined
·
501 Posts
I look at prepping as a wealth building strategy that is an alternative to investing in the stock market or buying whole/variable life insurance and bonds. I don't really have any fantasies about bugging out with what I can carry on my back, I will be bugging in at home with whatever I have stockpiled and I plan on being comfortable and well supplied.

To meet that goal, I buy things cheap and stack 'em deep. I have a comfortable three month food supply in my house right now for my girlfriend and myself. We have TP, razors, toothpaste, propane for cooking and boiling water, on and on. I doubt I have more than $2K in preps right now, but it's nice to know that the $2K I've invested would definitely cover my daily activities for several months. It's kind of like having money in the bank, but without market risk.

I'm not bugging out, I'm bugging in. The only portable kit I need is one designed to get me home.

Since my strategy is bugging in and living comfortably, I'm not really sure there's a ceiling in what I can invest in and not waste money. I can buy another jar of peanut butter, another bag of tea lights, another bag of matchbooks, another backgammon board or chess strategy book, another set of rechargeable batteries, another battery for my UPS, another tank of propane, another case of tuna... when is that investment going to go bad? Years? Decades?

Something I've found interesting is that now that I have a stockpile, I wait for sales. Tuna's not on sale this week at Albertson's... guess I'll skip it. Barillio pasta is 2 for 1? Ten boxes of angel hair, please. No sauce for sale? Oh well, Hunt's canned tomatoes were 10 for $10 a couple weeks ago so I doubt I'll be hurting for sauce any time soon. Dry beans are 10% off? I'll skip it. Turkey breast on sale 50% off post-Thanksgiving? I have a vacuum sealer that's dying for a workout, maybe that turkey will be a nice surprise this spring. Cream of mushroom soup, 20 cans for $10? 80 cans please. Buy it cheap and stack it deep.

What's really nice about this strategy is that I can ALWAYS pick up a 50 pound bag of rice to stretch my basics, and it will go well. When asparagus goes on sale at half off, I dig out my 2 for 1 Barillia pasta, a little olive oil I picked up on the cheap a while ago, some garlic I grew in my little garden this year, and one expensive heirloom tomato on full price from the store. Tell me that doesn't sound good.

A couple years ago I was buying backpacks and KaBars and **** like that, but now I approach preparedness as an alternative to investing in the stock market. I can buy cheap when things go on sale and store them appropriately for long term use, and stretch my today dollars as far as I can.

I didn't pick up a pressure canner this Thanksgiving, for which I'm kicking myself. Turkey was on sale for 29 cents a pound, I could have canned a hundred quarts of turkey and been wildly ahead of the game. That could have been a year's worth of protein for 10% of the normal price of healthy meat. I would have LOVED to pick up a couple days of overtime this week.

This works for anything, though. Next up for me is storing high quality wool socks when they go on sale. I will certainly pick up extra pairs of shoes or jeans or Dickies when they go on 50% off and add them to the rotation. How do you overspend on good quality wool socks? I can vacuum seal brand new pairs of wool socks and store them that way for twenty years and use them when I need them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,153 Posts
+1 Peak Oil.
If we do this right, we should be saving money on food. We are still using Tomato Puree bought at $0.50 per can and pasta bought at $0.50 per box. As we have replenished recently shelves, I just bought two cases (12 per case) of tomato puree on sale for $1.00 per can on past at .69 per box. Same is true for tuna, still stocked on our shelves at $0.79 per can, now selling on sale for $1.09 per can. We just buy like 10 times more than we would normally when things are on sale and rotate. Canned veggies always go on sale around this time of year so stock up. Razors, shaving cream, paper products, toothpaste, eetc. all with coupons. Nice point about the roughtly $2,000 spent on supplies, but if you use the stuff and don't waste, its $2,100 total you won't spend over several months. Rest of supplies are your batteries, garden supplies, guns and ammo. Don't go nuts there and you should be in shape. Add a generator, gasoline storage, radios, water storage etc. and you'll be in 100%. Next add alternate power starting with D.C. batteris, and go from their. At the same time, work on you and your skills, #1 being keeping in shape, rest getting yourself educated and mentally prepared.
 

·
I'll fix it
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
My family mainly eats fresh perishable foods. I found most my canned goods do not get used so, I give them to the food bank when they approach expiration. I have been concentrating on products designed for long term storage. I am trying to find new areas for storage to keep the house from being cluttered.
I think if your at the point where your tripping over your supplies or have no more storage space you have reached your limit.
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top