Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I`m not to worried about salt I have a feeling the stuff lasts forever but I was more concerned about sugar. I want to put them in long term storage. Mylar bags and oxygen aborbers. Anyone know the shelf life stored like this? Any info would be great. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Considering salt is a rock I bet it has an infinite life. Bacteria wont spoil it, it'll kill 'em.

Sugar on the other hand...I would think it would spoil quick even in a mylar bag, but I'm not sure.
 

·
In memory of Rokitdog
Joined
·
14,951 Posts
Considering salt is a rock I bet it has an infinite life. Bacteria wont spoil it, it'll kill 'em.

Sugar on the other hand...I would think it would spoil quick even in a mylar bag, but I'm not sure.
Seems to me I read here that sugar is a natural preservative and not as prone to bacterial invasion as you might think! I may be wrong so I'll research it!

Edit... I looked around and found some info that sugar is a natural preservative to some extent. Not as much as honey but from what I gather it has anti-bacterial properties and should not spoil anytime soon! I was going through my inventory recently and found some sugar in a coffee can that was a good 15 years old and though it solidified into a brick no spoilage was evident and it tasted fine! Used it in my coffee!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,561 Posts
Mylar Not Necessary

Both salt and sugar will store indefinitely in mylar.
Don't use an an O2 absorber with the sugar. It will cause the sugar to turn into a brick.

Mylar not necesssary .... no need for 02 absorber ...... FOOD GRADE bucket with gasketed lid ....... keep it dry ...... will last longer than civilization
 

·
Firefighter 129
Joined
·
336 Posts
On a note about O2 absorbers. I use food grade Diatomaceous Earth instead of the O2 absorbers. DE is used in Bisquick and flour. It is all natural. I am using it in my heirloom seeds buckets. I want them to grow when I plant them. If I take all the oxygen out of the container they may not sprout. Check it out. I buy it at the feed store. Cheap and a little goes a long way. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatomaceous_earth
 

·
Got Preps?
Joined
·
303 Posts
At the Mormon food storage place, their chart says you can store sugar for 10 years. They sell it in #10 cans without o2 absorbers. It will probably last longer but that is their recommended storage time. We bought some last year from them with several items.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Salt From Deep Salt Mines Is Millions Of Years Old...And

Sugar if kept cool and dry will also last a very long time. The dryer the better as it keeps viruses, bacteria and cooties down. In SW Oregon way back in the 1850's salt and sugar traded ounce for ounce for gold dust.

Seems the sugar came from Hawaii and the salt from the tidal flats somewhere in the Burmuda area. Cheap ocean transport followed by expensive pack mules over the mountains. HB of CJ (old coot)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,917 Posts
I've seen people put a little rice in a salt shaker-I guess to keep it from clumping. Not sure if that means anything to us preppers(?)
My father ran a charter fishing boat since 1971 and this rice trick is a big thing in a very humid environment.

As everyone has already said salt and sugar are the easiest storage item. But don't use o2 absorbers like some have mentioned.

Airtight( or more specific, ant tight) container sugar will last 15+ years and if chiseled and regranuarilized pretty much for your lifetime. Salt can be stored the same way pretty much forever, you can pass it down to your grandkids.

If you have the room I would just keep storing salt when you think of it. The cheap bucket with cheap lid from walmart and you are good to go. Or my last 25 bag (they only cost 4.40 at smart and final or Costco) I put in 2 liter bottles. It may be worth something some day, if not your family will never have to worry about salt.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ballenxj

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I have read that honey (as a sugar substitute) has a great shelf life since its all natural. If I can find a link, I will be glad to post here if folks are interested?
 

·
Peas and Carrots!
Joined
·
36,851 Posts
I have read that honey (as a sugar substitute) has a great shelf life since its all natural. If I can find a link, I will be glad to post here if folks are interested?
Honey never goes bad unless it is put up in unclean containers. It may crystalize but that can be reversed by putting the container in warm water and stirring a few times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
I wouldn't store it in mylar but what ever you store it in you need to put a few grains (1/4 cup) of rice in the salt/ sugar to help keep it from clumping
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
I've seen people put a little rice in a salt shaker-I guess to keep it from clumping. Not sure if that means anything to us preppers(?)
Yes, I do it to mine and I don't have a problem with it clumping.

The thing is you really need to put rice in with the salt/sugar IF your storing them in plastic. Air tight or not moisture will get through not a lot but enough to make the salt turn into a brick unless you got something to absorb the moisture aka rice :thumb:
 

·
Grevcon 10
Joined
·
13,594 Posts
I have read that honey (as a sugar substitute) has a great shelf life since its all natural. If I can find a link, I will be glad to post here if folks are interested?
They've found honey in pyramids that was still good.

Bacteria can't get simple sugar crystals through their membranes without water to dissolve it, and from what I understand it even damages those membranes killing the bacteria. Keep it completely dry and it will last forever.

Salt, as someone said, is a mineral. It's essentially a type of sand that dissolves in water. It won't go bad any more than a rock will.
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top