Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
"Through a glass, darkly"
Joined
·
1,948 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes, this does have to do with preparedness, and survival.

I haven’t seen much reference on the boards to cooking equipment. There is lots of advice on how to gather, or catch, a meal, but not much on what to do then.

Improvising in the field is fine, but if you had to grab ONE cooking device, what would it be?
My choice is simple: a wok.

Where the wok came from is clouded in mystery, and history, but my guess is that the basic shape originated in several cultures. Around the same time people figured how to make weapons out of metal, they applied the skill to the kitchen.

The design of the wok is tailor made for survival. It was made to cook fast, over high heat, with a limited amount of fuel available. I’ve seen Southeast Asians cook a complete meal in a wok using no more that 4 chunks of charcoal, each the size of your fist.

In my estimation, a single wok, two standard utensils, a steaming rack (or bamboo steamer basket), and possibly a lid, can do the job of a half-dozen “modern” pots and pans. The only thing you might want besides your wok, would be another wok, in a different size.

Think wok, think Chinese stir-fry. But wait, there’s more! Imagination is the only thing limiting the use of a wok.

  1. Boiling: Boiling water, soups, or rice.
  2. Braising: Braised dishes are commonly made using woks, especially when reducing sauces.
  3. Deep frying: High heat, more oil, no brainer.
  4. Steaming: Water in the bottom, a rack, or steaming basket of the proper diameter to raise it above water level.
  5. Stewing: Like soups, a wok is perfect for stews of all kinds. Brown your meat, pour in the liquid, reduce the heat and go.
  6. Other: Fry your sausage, scramble your eggs, make crepes, you'll come up with something else, I'm sure.
Trivia: The modern “gold pan” was largely based upon the woks used by the Chinese railroad gangs at the beginning of the California Gold Rush. Everyone was trying to placer mine with rockers, sluices, and even carved wooden bowls. Then somebody noticed the Chinese workers were gathering more gold using their cooking woks.
 

·
"Through a glass, darkly"
Joined
·
1,948 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you never heard of a wok....

Probably unnecessary, but here's a few pix of woks, and equipment:
Cookware and bakeware Wok Karahi Metal
Traditional wok
Cookware and bakeware Sauté pan Frying pan Wok Saucepan
Handle of either hollow metal, or wood
Kitchen utensil Tool Ladle Scoop Metal
Spatula
Product Kitchen utensil
Strainer
Food steamer Dim sum Cuisine Food Dish
Bamboo steamers (can also use metal rack)
 

·
RESET CONGRESS!!
Joined
·
9,462 Posts
A wok is a necessity. lol You can do so much with one, including carrying water and washing up. I've been working on learning to cook oriental foods for about the last year. Sauces are still a problem, but I'm improving. You can cook healthily with a wok. Less oil, less need for lots of meat. lots of veggies and rice. Cheaper too. I can think of no downside. Heck, I may make a wok hat too. lol
 

·
Here's my safety Sir
Joined
·
14,677 Posts
as long as i dont have to carry it my choice is cast iron cook ware.
seems nothing cooks in the flavor like the old iron.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
A wok is a necessity. lol You can do so much with one, including carrying water and washing up. I've been working on learning to cook oriental foods for about the last year. Sauces are still a problem, but I'm improving. You can cook healthily with a wok. Less oil, less need for lots of meat. lots of veggies and rice. Cheaper too. I can think of no downside. Heck, I may make a wok hat too. lol
Better than tinfoil.........
 

·
I have control issues
Joined
·
7,112 Posts
I HAVE to agree with the cast iron! I have barious size skillet, but if limited to only ONE, I would have to go with my cast iron "chicken fryer". Not only for frying, I also use it as my pot for making chili, spaghetti sauce, etc. Not only that, but since using the cast iron, I have NEVER had a problem with iron deficiency, even without taking supplements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,497 Posts
couldnt agree more, woks are about all we use for cooking.

They are very multi functional.

Cast iron is also great, but as far as size compared to weight, I would prefer a wok. You can get some heavy duty ones that don't weigh as much as a medium size cast iron pan. Plus boiling water in a cast iron pan is more difficult as they are often much more shallow than a wok.
 

·
Bleach blonde on fire :p
Joined
·
6,173 Posts
Cast iron is the only things I own! I went through my fair share of "non stick" pans (10 in 3 years) and finally found that the only thing that was non stick was cast iron.:thumb:


The pots and pans on there are nested together, some of the pans have smaller pans under them. I have 52 pieces in all (some of them are duplicates just in case something breaks).
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
wok is a great cooking tool if you have really high heat.
if I won't have any gas burner to cook, then its won't be all that great.
For cooking on open fire, what material can withstand multiple usage without burning through? Cast iron? Is enamel coated ones any more durable?
Who sells a quality stuff, not Chinese made specials.
Anyone use wood burning kitchen stove any more?
They are pretty few pennies, but since I have wood supply, it would be great way to cook.
 

·
"Through a glass, darkly"
Joined
·
1,948 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Cast iron is the only things I own! I went through my fair share of "non stick" pans (10 in 3 years) and finally found that the only thing that was non stick was cast iron.:thumb:

The pots and pans on there are nested together, some of the pans have smaller pans under them. I have 52 pieces in all (some of them are duplicates just in case something breaks).
Nice set!!!! BTW, how in the h*** can you "break" a cast iron pan/pot? :D:
Anyway, after spending years nurturing the seasoning of a fine cast iron pan, I would not want to boil water in it. That's what cast iron kettles are for.
Okay, now we have a 14" cast iron pan, and a 10" cast iron kettle. I just weighed mine and that equals 16.9 pounds. My 14" wok weighs 4 pounds.

Don't get me wrong. I'm a tried and true fan of cast iron. I own over a dozen pieces, including 2 Dutch ovens. But if I had to grab a pack, throw it on my back and head for the hills...my Dutch oven would be left in the dust, and my wok would be IN the pack.
 

·
"Through a glass, darkly"
Joined
·
1,948 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
wok is a great cooking tool if you have really high heat.
if I won't have any gas burner to cook, then its won't be all that great.
For cooking on open fire, what material can withstand multiple usage without burning through? Cast iron? Is enamel coated ones any more durable?
Who sells a quality stuff, not Chinese made specials.
I didn't mean for this to get into a political type argument about cast iron and iron woks. LOL. The wok has been around for about 2,000 years. As I said in the OP, a couple chunks of charcoal can cook a meal. No need to buck out a 6' log, just to make a cooking fire. A wok doesn't absolutely need extreme heat. It's made out of carbon steel. Sure you can melt a wok in a bonfire, I can do the same to my tire rims! Point is, if fuel is limited, you could cook with a wok on the charred remains of yesterday's fire, before you could get a cast iron pan hot enough to fry an egg.

All that aside, I have a friend who will absolutely refuse to eat anything that even sounds Oriental, let along looks, or is cooked that way. I understand there are plenty of people who would reject the whole idea that the Asians might have come up with something practical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
don't get me wrong please, I am an Asian.
I just had too many cheaply made Chinese stuff that don't hold up.
I am willing to pay more for quality products.
Thanks to this thread, I am looking for a good axe to chop up my wood. Is Snow& Neally's axe a good product anyone?
 

·
"Through a glass, darkly"
Joined
·
1,948 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
don't get me wrong please, I am an Asian.
I just had too many cheaply made Chinese stuff that don't hold up.
I am willing to pay more for quality products.
Thanks to this thread, I am looking for a good axe to chop up my wood. Is Snow& Neally's axe a good product anyone?
The wok I'm using right now was given to me in 1979 by a Japanese woman in Anchorage. I have no idea where it was made. The commercial hand-hammered woks I've seen in restaurant supply houses seem to be better quality than the one I have, and they still sell for under $30.

As for the axe queston, could you pop over to this thread, and I'm sure you'll get some answers, including mine: ;)

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showpost.php?p=609327&postcount=1
 
  • Like
Reactions: jungwoo

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
i use my cast iron pans to make bread,meatloaf and about anything else ,works over a stove or wood fire or coals get the right pan cover and you can bake bead over coals, just one pan can do about anything ,and easy to clean, if you hit some one in the head with it would knock them silly.
 

·
Bleach blonde on fire :p
Joined
·
6,173 Posts
Nice set!!!! BTW, how in the h*** can you "break" a cast iron pan/pot? :D:
Anyway, after spending years nurturing the seasoning of a fine cast iron pan, I would not want to boil water in it. That's what cast iron kettles are for.
Okay, now we have a 14" cast iron pan, and a 10" cast iron kettle. I just weighed mine and that equals 16.9 pounds. My 14" wok weighs 4 pounds.

Don't get me wrong. I'm a tried and true fan of cast iron. I own over a dozen pieces, including 2 Dutch ovens. But if I had to grab a pack, throw it on my back and head for the hills...my Dutch oven would be left in the dust, and my wok would be IN the pack.
You can break a cast iron pan or pot by dropping it or putting a cool substance in it when it is hot. I have never broken one but it could happen:upsidedown:. If nothin happens I just have extras to cook with.:thumb: I boil water in mine all the time, never has hurt the seasoning.

I have seen a cast iron wok like pan in a outdoors store at some point but I don't remeber where it was. Would that be the best of both worlds?

I found ithttp://www.lodgemfg.com/Logic-specialty-items.asp
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 40 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top