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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am starting to put together my (superior quality) vintage hand tools set. I just got my Stanley Brace, now looking for the set of bits. I know that a good set of saws, files, hammers, are going to be essential. Probably an Adze, as well as a couple of other things I can't think of.

If I get old school and wanted to build my cabin/barn what would I need?

Jerry D. Young, I KNOW you know!
 

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Here is a book you might be interested in: The New Traditional Woodworker: From Tool Set to Skill Set to Mind Set by Jim Tolpin.

I got this before my arthritis got so bad. Now I don't do any woodworking and was never more than DIY level at it, but this book is a great read even if you never touch a sanding block. I particularly like the emphasis on human powered tools. Rather than focusing on individual projects like a lot of books, this one focuses on knowledge about tools and techniques. The instructions for forming various types of low-hardware-required joins are particularly good I think with the spot shortages we're having. If you can't find the right size screws, there might be a traditional join that will work. He discusses possible sources for the more antique tools too. IMHO it's worth it to spend time and pay more for acquiring quality tools, as witness my beloved made-in-USA Stanley tape measure that's survived my bumbling novice attempts to reshape my world one inch at a time.

I love craft books, particularly human powered ones, so much that I sometimes read about crafts I don't do, just to get an eye for how sturdy and beautiful things are made so I know how to look for quality. I'm downsizing to live in a camper and this book gets a place, it's that good.

Wish you a wonderful cabin/barn raising. There's nothing more beautiful than a hand-hewn, sturdy beam that's been sweated on by someone who cares.
 

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Planes, hammers, saws, screwdrivers, awl, chisels and gouges, compass, scribe, ruler/tape (I like the old folding tapes), bits and braces, pliers and wrenches. Variances of each tool. I’m sure there is plenty more I’m forgetting.
 

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Draw knife, shingle froe, stone and file set.

And of course, the bench you build yourself..
Guy does a decent video but you DON’T acclimate wood like that. It should be stickers and as much weight as you have goes on top. I own a kiln and place at least 500lbs on the top slab and the bottom (I put the best quality stuff on the bottom) has around 8,000+ lbs. if you sticker and stack and add weights you won’t get as much cupping and can possibly remove some cupping and twisting. A dehumidifier and fan will dry it even more. In my kiln I take the wood down to 6% (less after the sanitation cycle) so when I make joints in wood and it reabsorbe natural humidity it locks those joints in very tightly.
 

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Just picked this up with a spare (replacement) blade. Made in Japan (good quality). Have their dovetail saw. Amazon, reduced price.

SUIZAN Japanese Ryoba Pull Saw 7 Inch Double Edge Hand Saw for Woodworking.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My brother is into woodworking in a big way, and he loves Two Cherries wood chisels, but I've priced them, and nope.

What I am wondering is should I specifically look for vintage tools. I honestly think that hand tools forty years ago were MUCH better quality than now. BUT, that might be my bias talking, why I come here for advice.

I agree, that book looks like a winner, and I will be looking for a copy.
 

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For new, I would look at Narex in the Czech Republic. I had to get some bent neck chisels for doing some very delicate plug work on a very old red oak hardwood floor and make it match. The Narex chisels did the job. Note: Had to finish sharpen them, as chisels were not ready-to-go out of the box. Not unusual. Have a complete set of Japanese waterstones for doing that work.

Would not buy CCC (Cheap Chinese C**p), as too much of it seems to be "butter steel". Otherwise it's cobble together sets of old US and English (Sheffield steel) chisels (I'm talking pre 1990 chisels), or very, very high end Japanese made chisels (SERIOUS $$$$).
 

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My brother is into woodworking in a big way, and he loves Two Cherries wood chisels, but I've priced them, and nope.

What I am wondering is should I specifically look for vintage tools. I honestly think that hand tools forty years ago were MUCH better quality than now. BUT, that might be my bias talking, why I come here for advice.

I agree, that book looks like a winner, and I will be looking for a copy.
Not 40 year old tools. More like 70-100 year old tools. 80’s tools is when China started importing cheap tools. Tools post WWI and WWII are good quality in general. They have to be to last that long.
 

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hammers and mallets >> there's a better one for each particular job ...

and - no such thing as toooooo many clamps - they are your best bud when you're a solo worker - bar, C, spring clamps ect ect
 

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hammers and mallets >> there's a better one for each particular job ...

and - no such thing as toooooo many clamps - they are your best bud when you're a solo worker - bar, C, spring clamps ect ect
Locking pliers are nice too. But not for old style tools. Yup, have your framing hammers, ball peen hammers, dead blow hammers, rubber hammers, leather hammers, wooden mallets, hand sledges, small sledge (4 lb) medium (8 lb) large (16 lb). Lots of variation of each of those. Then you have your blacksmith hammers. Just hammers can fill a tool box. Don’t forget wedges too!
 

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A very old friend of mine has his Grandfathers carpenters tool chest from when he was a shipwright in the Imperial German Navy. Circa 1890.

I've tried to get him to lay it out and photo it. A lot of the tools have hand carved handles, eg. the saws handles are all eagles heads. Just beautiful.

As I recall, it contained a framing saw, a cross-cut saw, a small framing saw, a miter saw and a scroll saw.
A complete set of wood chisels, up to @ 3" wide.
A hatchet, an offset handled axe, an adz, and an assortment of flat ended hatchets of several widths.
3 different sized mallets, and the neatest claw hammer you ever saw.
An assortment of files, saw sets, and 6 or 8 planes of different widths.
Hand made squares and levels.

I'm sure I'm missing some things, but with that he kept a clipper at sea.
 

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Over and Out
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I am starting to put together my (superior quality) vintage hand tools set...
I know it's been mentioned, but.. Just to second: Chisels, chisels, and Moar chisels!! (y) Invaluable for quality joinery..

Fwiw, I have done a good bit of shopping with These folks: Woodworking tools | Lamnia ..and have Always been pleased with the Quality & Longevity of the Swedish and Spanish tools.. FAR better than ANYthing produced by the 'Chinsese' :rolleyes: Adzes and draw-blades (for debarking, et al) start on Page 3, there, Iirc.. Friend of mine has These, and testifies they are Solid (for the Price..) MHG Timber Tools Chisels set, 5 pcs | Lamnia

..Also, they are the Only outlet (that I know of..) for my Personal-Fav Axes, 'Hachas Artesanas'.. Hachas Jauregi axes and Hatchets | Lamnia ..Spanish-steel at its Finest.. :cool:

Fwiw..
jd
 
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