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Discussion Starter #1
I just had a fever, pretty obvious just putting hand on brow. I do have a few lcd strip thermometers. I have thought about getting an electronic thermometer but have heard of problems with reliability. Is that the kind to get or a no contact thermometer? Or do you even need one? Is it important just in knowing if you have a very high fever? Or if you have susceptible people around like small kids or diabetics?
 

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I can't stand the electric ones and have replaced the couple I had with the old fashioned glass ones in sturdy storage tubes.
I do have the strip type in all my first aid kits, though.

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There are so many options. I think you get what you pay for, though.

I have an infrared thermometer for cooking, and when I’ve compared it to various regular thermometers in liquids or the surface of things, it’s pretty accurate. I even tried it inside my mouth, it was less than a degree off vs the regular thermometer. And instant.
 

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Which makes me wonder how significant is 1 degree difference? What are you looking for, just a high temperature or rapid rise or what?

Also where you take temperature on body can be significantly different.
 

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Which makes me wonder how significant is 1 degree difference? What are you looking for, just a high temperature or rapid rise or what?

Also where you take temperature on body can be significantly different.
On average, the 98.6F number is a degree too high. The standard was set all the way back in the Civil War. There was a lot more mild fevers back then before we had vaccines and pediatrics reduce the amount of generalized low grade fevers. We also live more sedentary lives now. No one has made a serious effort to update the standard and too many have come to accept 98.6F.

Fact is that 97.5F is really the right normal temp for most of us.
 

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If it’s good to search, then it’s possible, thanks for the link.
What? There are no links in this thread and your post makes no sense because of that.
 

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We have at least a couple of the older high quality thermometers! If I really wanted another one I’d likely look for a used one on eBay or somewhere.

All that being said we never really use one since it really would not change what we’re going to do!

Someone is sick and feels hot ok go to work!

Now beyond a certain limit I’d likely check out of curiosity, but it still wouldn’t change what I was going to do!

SD
 

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I didn’t know you could still buy mercury thermometers.
You have to know where to look. Hospitals replaced theirs with alcohol-filled units decades ago, and of course use electronic therms only these days. Mercury is a silver color, the alcohol-filled models have a red liquid (colored for visual clarity).

I have a few mercury yet somewhere, more alcohol filled, and use under-the-tongue predictive electronic models for routine use.

1 degree difference can and does matter. For a toddler a 104 temp is tolerable, but for you and I it means we need to get really serious about addressing it. But the difference between 100 and 101 is still fairly negligible for either age group.

RR
 

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We've got a Welch Allyn electronic version. It was very expensive. This is the same stuff that's in the doctor's office. When one of the kids was little, we had a bit of a problem and needed to do somewhat frequent assessments of various sorts at home. (Fortunately, all that's in the past.) Anyway, the "cheap" drugstore stuff, (even $20 or more though),was not accurate or precise. We knew this by comparing the units to each other and a calibrated unit at docs. This expensive thing was much closer. Nothing is perfect it seems, but this high end unit was within a couple tenths of a point of the others on a consistent basis. So even if the actual number was slightly off, we believe it's reasonably precise and we could always trust directional trends.

We have a plain old thermometer, (no idea what's in it, but I don't think it's mercury), but mostly we use the expensive one. (Because we have it.) The probe covers are a few bucks for a bunch of boxes of them. (I think it was like $15 and we'll likely not have to buy these again - we hope - for the rest of our lives.)

Not everyone can drop $150 on a thermometer. I get that. But when you need truly medical grade at home when a little kid is involved, you make it happen. For general day-to-day, likely overkill. I'm just responding with all this for those that can afford it... it does seem the best and that's what the thread is about, so just thought I'd add our experience with it.
 

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We've got a Welch Allyn electronic version. It was very expensive. This is the same stuff that's in the doctor's office. When one of the kids was little, we had a bit of a problem and needed to do somewhat frequent assessments of various sorts at home.....
Calibrated it lately?
 

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Calibrated it lately?
Nope. We no longer have the same need we did. But that's a great point. I think what I'll do is bring it to the next family Dr. appointment and check it against their gear. If it's off by too much, (maybe a few tenths I suppose), I'd have to find out how to get that done. Thanks for pointing that out.
 
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