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devil's advocate
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
And how many?
I'll be wearing sandals, (because I always do) probably Keen hybrids (if my new pair works out.. otherwise, back to Tevas) and it'll be mild or warm during the day, (edit: It'll be in California) probably not much rain.

I'm sort of short on socks in general, and most of mine are cotton. (I wear them all the time in the city or on walks and camping, except when it rains.) Some are a thicker wool blend. What else would you recommend getting? Do you know of any good types of light or cool socks that are also durable/long-lasting? And ones that won't be unpleasant if they get damp?
I plan to wear socks most of the time.

Thanks!

PS This will be my first backpacking trip. (Wish me luck. :3 )
 

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Sorry, but this sounds like a disaster waiting to happen.

If you could provide us with more details about the trip itself, your feet, your shoes, and previous distances walked in these "sandals", someone might be able to make a semi-guess as to what you'll need.

As for how many to pack? Depends on how many socks you'll go through in a day. Then it's simple math now isn't it?

:)
 

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Clothing sales always has a great selection but I don't think you have one of those.
Cabelas is good. Any polypropylene, wool, acrylic or synthetic sock will do. Double layers are nice.
 

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I no longer day hike in sandal or low cut hikers since receiving to many knee injuries. I prefer smartwool socks for there breathablity factor. Rule of thumb is carry two pairs. Let one pair dry on the outside of your pack while you wear the other. Since they are mostly wool they dry faster and seem to stink less. Yes,cool breathable wool. Cotton is like a tissue on your foot. no way.
 

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Wool, wool, and wool are my recommendations; Three pair at a minumum, if you run below that take you least wet and used pair and keep them against your chest, they'll dry pretty quick and you can put them back on.

From NOLS:

Dry your socks

Drying socks is a continual activity on wilderness trips. During the day we stick wet socks into our shirts to dry them against the skin, and likewise at night drape them over our chest and belly in our sleeping bags. We'll hang them in the sun and dry them over a fire. Keep one pair of dry socks in a dry place such as in a sleeping bag or a small plastic bag.

Sleep with warm, dry feet

Sleeping in dry feet is very helpful, but there is a false impression that this offers complete protection. People coping with multi-day wet cold conditions have developed immersion foot by hiking for a single day in wet socks. A single night of sleeping in cool wet socks has undone weeks of vigilant attention. Not only should we go to bed with warm dry feet, they need to stay that way all night long.
 

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Nice hiking shoes by Columbia and old man type polyester socks. The shoes are excellent and the socks wick away more moisture than anything else.

The shoe style depends upon weather conditions, of course...
 

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devil's advocate
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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry, but this sounds like a disaster waiting to happen.

If you could provide us with more details about the trip itself, your feet, your shoes, and previous distances walked in these "sandals", someone might be able to make a semi-guess as to what you'll need.

As for how many to pack? Depends on how many socks you'll go through in a day. Then it's simple math now isn't it?

:)
We're going to be backpacking in Desolation, which is in California near Lake Tahoe. It's sort of a foresty mountainy area with big flat boulders. That's really all I know.

I've worn nothing but Teva sandals for 12 years, and done all my camping and hiking in them with no problems. I'm switching to Keens (They've got a covered toe, but the rest is more open like a sandal.) because they seem very durable, and living in the city wore my current Tevas out really fast. (I walk everywhere.) I will have a couple months to test them before the trip. I don't want to wear regular shoes or boots because I hate having hot, sweaty feet.
 

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devil's advocate
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Discussion Starter #8
I no longer day hike in sandal or low cut hikers since receiving to many knee injuries. I prefer smartwool socks for there breathablity factor. Rule of thumb is carry two pairs. Let one pair dry on the outside of your pack while you wear the other. Since they are mostly wool they dry faster and seem to stink less. Yes,cool breathable wool. Cotton is like a tissue on your foot. no way.
I've never had a knee injury of any kind, really. Could you explain to me why it's more of a problem with sandals?

Thanks for the sock advice!
 

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devil's advocate
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Discussion Starter #9
Wool, wool, and wool are my recommendations; Three pair at a minumum, if you run below that take you least wet and used pair and keep them against your chest, they'll dry pretty quick and you can put them back on.

From NOLS:

Dry your socks

Drying socks is a continual activity on wilderness trips. During the day we stick wet socks into our shirts to dry them against the skin, and likewise at night drape them over our chest and belly in our sleeping bags. We'll hang them in the sun and dry them over a fire. Keep one pair of dry socks in a dry place such as in a sleeping bag or a small plastic bag.

Sleep with warm, dry feet

Sleeping in dry feet is very helpful, but there is a false impression that this offers complete protection. People coping with multi-day wet cold conditions have developed immersion foot by hiking for a single day in wet socks. A single night of sleeping in cool wet socks has undone weeks of vigilant attention. Not only should we go to bed with warm dry feet, they need to stay that way all night long.
Thank you, and thanks for the NOLS advice!
I do hate having damp feet, so I'm sure I'll have no problem following it. :B
 

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Here's Johnny!
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Did you end up getting these: ?



If you did, you won't need to break those in at all. I'm not real sure that they could really broken in anyway.

Socks?

Don't be afraid to spend a little dough on some good socks. ($15-$20/pr) My rec? SMARTWOOL for backpacking. These are by far, the most comfortable pairs of backpacking socks that I own. (I even wear 'em with my Keen Newports too) :thumb:

 

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devil's advocate
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Discussion Starter #11
Did you end up getting these: ?



If you did, you won't need to break those in at all. I'm not real sure that they could really broken in anyway.

Socks?

Don't be afraid to spend a little dough on some good socks. ($15-$20/pr) My rec? SMARTWOOL for backpacking. These are by far, the most comfortable pairs of backpacking socks that I own. (I even wear 'em with my Keen Newports too) :thumb:

Thanks! I didn't get those exact Keens, I got the Venice style. (I read several very good reports, and no negative ones, so I'm optimistic.)
I think a couple people have mentioned the smartwool socks now, I'll definitely check them out. :3
 

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trois pour cent
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I highly recommend the smart wools. Wool holds up well. Insulates even when wet. Does not stink. The smart wools come in various thickness so pick what suits you.

As for hiking in sandals, some people can get away with it. But it increases your risk of plantar fasciitis and and ankle injury. Either of which can make it tough to get home. And P.F. can take a couple of years or more to heal, making your life miserable in the meantime.

From a survival standpoint if nothing else, it really might be better to put your feet in sturdier gear.

I carry my sandals clipped to the outside of my pack and change into them when I make camp or for river crossings. Switched from Tevas and Chaco's to Keen's for the increased arch support and the toe guard.
 

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Here's Johnny!
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I carry my sandals clipped to the outside of my pack and change into them when I make camp or for river crossings.
Me too. A couple of years ago, though I actually hiked 15 miles in a pr of Crocs! :xeye:

We're going to be backpacking in Desolation, which is in California near Lake Tahoe. It's sort of a foresty mountainy area with big flat boulders. That's really all I know.
Watch your ankles. Sprained or broken ankles and be a bad way to end a backpacking trip quickly! I was looking at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desolation_Wilderness That place looks amazing! Probably not a place I'd wear my Keens, but then again, my ankles are weak. I'd have to boot up for sure!

We were on this trail 3 yrs ago:


Can you imagine 18 miles of that? My ankles were wrapped with Coban 3M, boots laced to give ankle support and still thought my ankles were going to snap! :eek: Not fun. But Desolation looks much less 'rocky'.
 

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devil's advocate
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Discussion Starter #14
Me too. A couple of years ago, though I actually hiked 15 miles in a pr of Crocs! :xeye:



Watch your ankles. Sprained or broken ankles and be a bad way to end a backpacking trip quickly! I was looking at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desolation_Wilderness That place looks amazing! Probably not a place I'd wear my Keens, but then again, my ankles are weak. I'd have to boot up for sure!

We were on this trail 3 yrs ago:


Can you imagine 18 miles of that? My ankles were wrapped with Coban 3M, boots laced to give ankle support and still thought my ankles were going to snap! :eek: Not fun. But Desolation looks much less 'rocky'.
Wow! For that, yes, I might wear boots. I haven't ever had ankle problems though, so I'm not too worried about Desolation. (I'll watch out for everything that's been mentioned, though.) It won't be very intense hiking, either, considering the people I'll be with.

And hey, what's the big deal with Crocs? I haven't actually tried them. They must be more comfortable than they look, yes? :B
 

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Me too. A couple of years ago, though I actually hiked 15 miles in a pr of Crocs! :xeye:



Watch your ankles. Sprained or broken ankles and be a bad way to end a backpacking trip quickly! I was looking at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desolation_Wilderness That place looks amazing! Probably not a place I'd wear my Keens, but then again, my ankles are weak. I'd have to boot up for sure!

We were on this trail 3 yrs ago:


Can you imagine 18 miles of that? My ankles were wrapped with Coban 3M, boots laced to give ankle support and still thought my ankles were going to snap! :eek: Not fun. But Desolation looks much less 'rocky'.
Any man that can go 15 miles in crocs ....... :thumb:
Me? I've had one ankle completely rebuilt, several long rehabs from plantar fasciitiis and a torn ACL. I'm healthy as a horse now but with that in my past I make sure I'm wearing the footgear that is most likely to get me home under my own power. I'm even choosy about my house slippers.:D:

Chilkoot Trail, AK
 

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Here's Johnny!
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And hey, what's the big deal with Crocs? I haven't actually tried them. They must be more comfortable than they look, yes? :B
That statement could've been mine a few years ago! I mean ... Look at these ugly-ass shoes:



Yes! They are much more comfortable than they look! Those little 'nobbies' in the shoe totally massage your feet tho'. I've found that they are really better 'camp shoes' than hikers. But it was nice to see that they were comfortable enough to get the job done that day! (And yet another pair of shoe/sandals that are just as comfortable while wearing socks.)

:D:
 

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We're going to be backpacking in Desolation, which is in California near Lake Tahoe. It's sort of a foresty mountainy area with big flat boulders. That's really all I know.

I've worn nothing but Teva sandals for 12 years, and done all my camping and hiking in them with no problems. I'm switching to Keens (They've got a covered toe, but the rest is more open like a sandal.) because they seem very durable, and living in the city wore my current Tevas out really fast. (I walk everywhere.) I will have a couple months to test them before the trip. I don't want to wear regular shoes or boots because I hate having hot, sweaty feet.
To each their own, but...

I would suggest you consider a like hiking boot for additional ankle support. People who dress for comfort and "minimal gear" often find themselves in trouble when things don't go to plan - they are unprepared. Many people could do with just sandals, but you should know your own abilities better than anyone online, and can make the judgment call as to what footwear would be needed.

Option 1: What you have - Sandals.
The whole point of sandals for you, is heat management (right?) So on that, I would question whether you need socks at all, but since you want to be prepared, I would suggest a lightweight wool sock, or sports sock (nothing 100% cotton though).

Option 2: Hiking boots.
If you decide you'll be better off with additional foot/ankle support then you want to make sure your feet don't overheat; even in the winter season. A 2 pair sock system would be best imho. A base layer to wick away the sweat and provide a slick surface to slide against the outer layer (so no friction blisters arise), and an outer layer to allow good airflow (or best airflow) and cushioning.

There is a great deal of information already on the web about hiking socks, for all sorts of activities and intensity levels.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=good+hiking+sock&btnG=Google+Search&meta=

:)
 

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devil's advocate
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Discussion Starter #19
To each their own, but...

I would suggest you consider a like hiking boot for additional ankle support. People who dress for comfort and "minimal gear" often find themselves in trouble when things don't go to plan - they are unprepared. Many people could do with just sandals, but you should know your own abilities better than anyone online, and can make the judgment call as to what footwear would be needed.

Option 1: What you have - Sandals.
The whole point of sandals for you, is heat management (right?) So on that, I would question whether you need socks at all, but since you want to be prepared, I would suggest a lightweight wool sock, or sports sock (nothing 100% cotton though).

Option 2: Hiking boots.
If you decide you'll be better off with additional foot/ankle support then you want to make sure your feet don't overheat; even in the winter season. A 2 pair sock system would be best imho. A base layer to wick away the sweat and provide a slick surface to slide against the outer layer (so no friction blisters arise), and an outer layer to allow good airflow (or best airflow) and cushioning.

There is a great deal of information already on the web about hiking socks, for all sorts of activities and intensity levels.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=good+hiking+sock&btnG=Google+Search&meta=

:)
I'll consider bringing my boots, and I'll be closely analyzing the performance of my new sandals in the weeks before the trip, but for me, sandals are the default walking/hiking/everything shoe, rather than the exception, and I've read many reports of successful backpacking trips in them. :3

But thank you for your concern and all the advice, it's been very helpful. I think I know what kind of things to look for in a hiking sock now. :3
 

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I'll consider bringing my boots, and I'll be closely analyzing the performance of my new sandals in the weeks before the trip, but for me, sandals are the default walking/hiking/everything shoe, rather than the exception, and I've read many reports of successful backpacking trips in them. :3

But thank you for your concern and all the advice, it's been very helpful. I think I know what kind of things to look for in a hiking sock now. :3
Eh, no problem. I'm interested in hearing how your feet hold out during this trip, as the more I read about these hiking-sandals, particularly KEEN Footwear, the more I think about getting a pair for the warmer months.

Desolation looks awesome! :cool:
 
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