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I have issues
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Discussion Starter #1
Group skills

First not sure if this is the right place for this, if not please move it where it should be.

Ok I was thinking about this recently, reevaluating what I alrady have set up in my group. And was wondering for those others here who have a group, or for those wanting to start a group. What would you consider to be a good group size and the skills needed?

As an example in my group there are 10 people.
Skills in this group include
1 doctor, MD
1 Dentist, general
3 paramedics, with more than 10 years experience each
1 RN with 6 years experience.
1 electrician
1 farmer/rancher
1 general contractor in home repair/construction
1 general electronics contractor.

Within these 10 several have military/LE experience. One with Ham radio communication experience. Some have welding and or machinist experience. One has experience with firearm repair, and ammunition manufacture. There are some kids included in the group but not in the above numbers.

Anyone with thoughts ideas or groups of their own?
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Honestly, that's pretty darn good collection of skills. If that was what you ended up with and no more you would be doing pretty well. But I'll try to help round out your dream team.

A engineer or two wouldn't hurt, preferably mechanical and/or industrial.

You might also look to reinforcing the welding and machinist skills with people who do it for a living. Vehicle mechanic would be handy as well.

You might also have all those medical folks take up the hobby of herbal medicine and foraging so they can extent their efficacy long past the time when modern supplies run out. They may already be doing this but you didn't mention it.

I also think you could stand to have a few more lower skill folks in the group. Youthful folks who can be trained and have the muscle needed to get stuff done. Life after any bad event is going to consist of a lot more labor intensive jobs.

Finally, you mention military experience, but have any of them had the skill training that comes from being a junior officer or senior noncom in infantry skills. There is a big difference in being part of the military/LE as opposed those who went to combat leadership school. You can have all the weaponry, nerve, and shooting skill in the world, but you still need proper tactics when facing organized opposition.

Again, your group might already have some of these skills that you didn't mention. I'm just going by what you put up.
 

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I have issues
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Discussion Starter #3
One of the kids is 15 about to turn 16. He is working part time now with a guy who is into auto mechanics and plumbing. He has been learning several skills that would come in handy. One of the men in my group was a squad leader, but that is about all the combat leadership there is. I am sure there are many areas for improvement, and that is one reason I posted this to get some ideas. Thanks.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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The army and marines do train all troops in the rudiments of unit tactics and keep piling on the training as they gain rank and billet, especially if they are in line units. But until either a junior officer is assigned to infantry officer school or a noncom in a line unit reaches staff rank and goes to infantry noncom school there is not a complete training regimen presented as a whole cohesive concept. Squad leaders do get some training but that is rarely beyond platoon level scope and only teaches tactics, not strategic planning. Even while platoon training might seem enough for your group it is really at company and battalion level where you learn to deal with complex situations and extensive contingency plans. It being assumed that higher command will simply order the necessary unit moves without explaining the why of everything. That works great if you have a larger unit and long chain of command, but to an isolated platoon they have to fall back on the special training the platoon commander and platoon sergeant received in a special school.

It's good you are bringing along the kids, but you might consider inviting some young vets fresh from their one-hitch enlistments. They won't know a lot like your other skilled professionals but they will bring much needed energy, strength, and enthusiasm to the group. You only need to ask your farmer/rancher about what I mean. Running a farm or ranch without modern fuel and electricity supplies is a bear of a job. There was a good reason that pioneers settling America went for big families. It took a decent sized mob working all day every day just to get the job done. If all of you are stuck dealing with subsistence then you don't have a lot of time leftover for higher order projects.

You seem to have a great brain trust in your group. Just looks like you could use a bit more brawn to assist it. Fortunately that is easier to remedy than finding the skill sets you already have.
 
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I have issues
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Discussion Starter #5
I know there are other things needed here, but for the time being this is what we have.
I was also thinking if there were other groups that would be close, or somewhat close if the groups could trade skill sets. I do think anything like that would be down the road so to speak after things settle down. But then there is always the hope that none of this will be needed, but just in case is why we all work on prepping anyway.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Well then, I revert to my first statement and say you already have a group you should be proud of. Few groups under 20 have that level of expertise, and that's not counting your medical training abundance.

My great grandfather was a country doctor who spent most of his actual money on supplies, but never wanted for anything. His town supported his living needs to ensure he stayed around.

You have the medical skill concentration to support a group of 100 or more. Actually, that medical group of yours is a bonafide cottage barter industry after any serious calamity. If you reached out to other groups in your close region you could rely on them to assist you simply to keep that medical expertise at their disposal. Also again why I mentioned self training in herbal medicine so that you could establish a long term medical clinic that doesn't burn through precious modern supplies rapidly.

A working medical clinic after SHTF would be worthy of a large community defense effort.
 

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I have issues
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Discussion Starter #7
The kids can help work garden areas and wives with whatever their skill/knowledge are in. I am a bit concerned with security. While this is not the smallest group I know of I still think there are limits of what can be covered. So your thoughts on younger ex military people will be looked into for sure.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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You could even combine that need with your existing practice, as well as a patriotic gesture as well. Simply ask your group of medical professionals to donate a little free time at your closest VA facility. Lots of them in Texas and all of them are bursting at the seams because of the great need for veteran care here. Texas has 1.7 million veterans. That's the second highest raw total behind California. It's also in the top 5 of states for veterans under 25 both in total and as a percentage of population.

Being a veteran using VA facilities in Texas I can attest to the great need for medical professionals donating any kind of time they can. It might even be tax deductible for your practice. The point being is that just working a half day a week at a facility would put you in contact with a dozen or more local vets each day. It would be a nice way to pre-evaluate those who might be worth approaching. Asking about a veteran's current life and lifestyle is part of a legitimate medical evaluation. That it might lead to a completely different conversation is merely incidental.

I won't ask what area of Texas you are in, but there are over a dozen major hospital systems with an additional 60 odd community clinics. There is always one somewhere near you.
 
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Good Luck TachMed

You will need it. What you will probably end up with is a dozen couch potatoes welfare receivers who don't have ONE CLUE as to what has happened or what to do. Even within select highly trained and educated people, (fire department, police, als ems, military) you will quickly find out that most folks are not clued in on prepping, preparing or general and specific mind trends after the SHTF. If only one out of your dream group has it together, you are still better off than most. Amazing anything today gets done at all. HB of CJ (old coot. retarded FF, PM, RN, etc..now silly old coot) :)
 

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I have issues
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Discussion Starter #10
You will need it. What you will probably end up with is a dozen couch potatoes welfare receivers who don't have ONE CLUE as to what has happened or what to do. Even within select highly trained and educated people, (fire department, police, als ems, military) you will quickly find out that most folks are not clued in on prepping, preparing or general and specific mind trends after the SHTF. If only one out of your dream group has it together, you are still better off than most. Amazing anything today gets done at all. HB of CJ (old coot. retarded FF, PM, RN, etc..now silly old coot) :)

While I will not go into specifics with what my group has done to this point, each has contributed very well to supplies, and prepping in general. Much of what we want at the BOL has already been built, and plans have been made to expand on what is done to this point. These people are highly motivated in part due to the political atmosphere we now find ourselves. But also because everyone knows something will most likely come in the near future that will need these preps. We have all been prepping much on our own for the last several years and some longer.
As far as couch potatoes, welfare receivers, not a one in the bunch thank you.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Yeah TachMed, I didn't buy into his prediction your crew would be couch potatoes. Your crew's professions don't lend themselves to laziness. If anything it would be the opposite, namely being distracted with a full schedule. But if they are committed and make a point to set aside time regularly then y'all should be good.
 

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You've got alot of medics - I would make sure they are able to do quite a bit of other skills, and are willing to garden, hunt, etc, and not sit around all day waiting for someone to get sick. Is the farmer/rancher a small homesteader, or what? There are alot of large 'ranches' that grow one crop, and would have no idea how to grow a real, food producing garden. I'd want another gardener, and add someone who is skilled at hunting and trapping, and someone who can cook, sew, and clean meats, etc.
 

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I have issues
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Discussion Starter #13
You've got alot of medics - I would make sure they are able to do quite a bit of other skills, and are willing to garden, hunt, etc, and not sit around all day waiting for someone to get sick. Is the farmer/rancher a small homesteader, or what? There are alot of large 'ranches' that grow one crop, and would have no idea how to grow a real, food producing garden. I'd want another gardener, and add someone who is skilled at hunting and trapping, and someone who can cook, sew, and clean meats, etc.
He is a medium sized farmer, rotates crops each year, but the principles are the same. There are several skills disbursed between the group other than medical. However I do know there is much more needed.
 

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Looks like a robust, skilled group. Something I did not see (may have missed it) is "CROSS-TRAINING." It will do no good if the Ham operator or the Doctor become incapacited and no one can step-in to fill the void. Obviously some skills cannot be easily transferred, but two is one and one is none ;)
 

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I have issues
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Discussion Starter #15
Looks like a robust, skilled group. Something I did not see (may have missed it) is "CROSS-TRAINING." It will do no good if the Ham operator or the Doctor become incapacited and no one can step-in to fill the void. Obviously some skills cannot be easily transferred, but two is one and one is none ;)
I agree 110% I do know the Dentist and Dr. work on that, since they are both very advanced in their fields. The other skills farming, construction and the like have been shared. We all get together as often as we can and work on things together at the BOL so skills are shared. I have learned me and electricity don't get along.
The HAM operator and one of the other medics are partners at their job and get together to talk on the radio so guess we might have that covered.
Other skills I know are lacking and need to be worked on.
 

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Green Thumb inclined
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What skills do you think a 5-8 person group would need for mid-long term survival if SHTF 1year+

Specifically those skills that don't require a degree or over 6 months regular training to prove proficient.
 

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Physical fitness (or otherwise the ability to be relied on to be usable for more than one thing, and manpower is only as good as your ability to use that manpower).
 

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Katniss
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In my humble opinion a frequently overlooked aspect of survival is the emotionally and psychologically preparing oneself for the hardships (neverending cold, heat, hunger, thirst and emotional trauma of the overall situation) plus the added basic emotional stress that such an extreme situation would cause to the average individual.

I heard on a movie one time that if you wait until an emergency happens to decide what to do, then you're already dead. You've got to be prepared emothionally beforehand to make the tough decisions whether to run or fight, travel or bunker down, who to include in your group and who to leave behind ... and possibly (in the most extreme circumstance, whether to kill in self defense or not.

Although, I believe the answer that you're looking for includes the long term survival skills including firestarting without a zippo lighter, field dressing a game animal, proficient trapping, hunting and fishing skills, making a permanent shelter, gardening, cooking over an open fire, and with a small group of 8 individuals, stealth and "laying low" - which is the best defense for a small group against criminal elements such as looters and marauders.
 

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Survivor
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Basic wound management and primary care are essential as everyone gets sick or injured. In addition to that is someone with basic maintenance skills such as simple plumbing, carpentry, mechanics, and tool use.

Everything breaks, and without the local wally world or doctors office open, you will have to fix it yourself.
 

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Shooting/tactics and medical

Most gunfights (civilian world) happen in under 4 seconds.

If your shot and have an arterial bleed your unconscious in under 90 seconds.

Learning to avoid getting shot and preserving life are THE most time sensitive skills.

You can go 3 days without water, 3 weeks without food.

You can purify water with many things
You can boil it, dig for it, collect it, get it from plants etc.

You can grow food, stockpile food, gather food, hunt food, trade for food, and buy food


But if your shot you have 90 seconds (or less) of concious life.

Know how to spend it wisely.

Beoyond that: it depends on:
1. What you call mid-long, and
2. What you put back.


If something happens for 2 years and you have 5 years of food... You don't need to grow food

If you have extra generator parts and fuel..... Or solar/wind/hydro you have less need of hand tools.

If you have mules you might not need a tractor....


Also, if you live in Fl you might not need the chainsaws and wood harvesting tools/skills you would need in NY

Too general

Instead: record what you use in 30 days.

Then stock up on it.

While this is happening do 6 months...

Then a year.

(you don't need firewood in summer, nor allergy pills in winter)

Find things to replace store bought needs (local raw honey rather than those sinus meds) etc

You'll know how to go from there.
 
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