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Funerals are there, of course, for earthly friends and family. However, beyond that what happens on Sunday morning? Nothing? An inclusion in the announcements of the person’s passing? Something else?

Two Sundays in a row now we’ve memorialized members who have reposed in a very profound way in a special way at the end of the liturgy.
 

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Announcement in the bulletin. If there is a particular need, it is sometimes printed, but the need is usually passed via elders, deacons, deaconnesses, and mission groups.

Prayers for surviving family and friends during the service. Some churches do this for a whole month, and others only one week.

The Pastor visits the family as soon as he is notified of the death and makes arrangements for an elder, deacon, or deaconness to be the point of contact/coordinator for anything that may arise. The assignment generally lasts a year and the point of contact is listed in the bulletin with the notice of passing in the bulletin and on the bulletin board.

Also... the congregation helps the survivors with whatever. Cleaning, cleaning out, yardwork, laundry, to/from cleaners, child and elder sitting, food, funeral/interrment arrangements, flowers, etc., etc., etc. A couple of members *guard* the house during funeral, visitation, etc. so bad stuff doesn't happen.

At one church I used to go to that had an attached church cemetery, the Pastor and immediate surviving family (only) would go out to the grave after the first regular Sunday service after the burial.
 

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We usually bury them here.... Though it has been a few decades since I have been "in" a church, could have changed but I really doubt it.
 

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Confessional Lutherans provide a reverent, solemn burial of the dead:

We do NOT permit eulogies as they focus on the life of the deceased rather than the blessings of Christ, and often are lacking in accuracy respecting the life of the deceased.

We do NOT have slide shows of the deceased, but preach the Gospel of Christ crucified and risen.

We DO talk about the blessings God worked through the life of the deceased and of how the faith of the deceased was enriched by the Word and Sacraments of God.

We do talk about the deceased having been a sinner (as are all men) and that his/her sins were forgiven through the suffering and death of Christ.

We DO talk about the baptism of the deceased having been completed by his/her death and about the sure and certain hope of eternal life with Christ, and the reunion of loved ones in the life to come.

We DO pray for the families of the deceased (not the deceased as he/she no longer requires our prayers) during the Sunday morning services and often provide meals to the families following the death of a loved one. If there are special needs of the families, the congregation does the best it can to meet them.
 

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Burials or cremations, with a service at the church and/or at the chapel at the crematorium. Burials are more problematic, as the population becomes more mobile and people are less likely to maintain a grave. Also many graveyards are full and we have pressure on land. At my local church marked graves inside the church date back to 1325, and every new grave outside uncovers human remains, which then have to be re-interred.

We do have eulogies and pray for the soul of the departed, and for comfort for their family left behind. We also have a service on All Souls Day, to pray for them.
 

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Funerals are there, of course, for earthly friends and family. However, beyond that what happens on Sunday morning? Nothing? An inclusion in the announcements of the person’s passing? Something else?

Two Sundays in a row now we’ve memorialized members who have reposed in a very profound way in a special way at the end of the liturgy.
I assume that your priest held a Panikhida (Service for the Dead) after Divine Liturgy.

Recognizing that the soul doesn't have the easiest road to heaven the Orthodox Church has a set schedule to help it along. The funeral service and burial begins the process. Since the soul remains earthbound for 40 days we have a special Panikhida at the 40 day mark after the body died. In six months there is another Panikhida, and finally one at the one year anniversary.

Of course, any parishioner can request that the priest pray for their departed relatives and friends during the Divine Liturgy by providing a list of names to the starosta (Church elder). With a little advance notice a "Panikhida" can be ordered for after the Divine Liturgy.

While the grief and suffering of the departed's survivors is not ignored and they are emotionally cared for by the parish, the main concern is for the journey of the soul of the deceased to G-d.
 

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Confessional Lutherans provide a reverent, solemn burial of the dead ... We DO pray for the families of the deceased (not the deceased as he/she no longer requires our prayers) ...
Sometimes I wonder if my conversion to Catholicism was at least in part to pray for my deceased loved ones and long-departed ancestors. If St. Paul can do it, so can we:

May the Lord grant mercy to the household of Onesiphorus, for he often refreshed me; he was not ashamed of my chains, but when he arrived in Rome he searched for me eagerly and found me - may the Lord grant him to find mercy from the Lord on that Day -- and you well know all the service he rendered at Ephesus. (2 Timothy 1:16-18)
 

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Panikhida / Orthodox Service for the Dead / English

PANIKHIDA / ORTHODOX SERVICE FOR THE DEAD / ENGLISH
St. Nicholas Orthodox Church, Mogadore, OH

 

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Blessing the Graves

BTW, I should mention the Orthodox practice of blessing the graves of our relatives and friends who have fallen asleep in the Lord.

On the Tuesday of the second week after Holy Pascha (Easter) Orthodox Christians go to the cemetery to bless the graves of their relatives and friends. Some bless the graves two days earlier on St. Thomas Sunday (the Sunday after Holy Pascha).

The Russians, Ukrainians, and Byelorussians call this day "Радоница / Radonitsa" which means "Day of Rejoicing." Among the people it is commonly referred to as "Красная горка /Krasnaya gorka" which means "The Beautiful Sorrow."

We pack food and drink and go to the cemetery where a number of priests will be present to do the blessing of the graves when requested by a family. After the blessing and prayers we hang out, eat, drink, and talk about the loved one whom we are visiting that day.

Many years ago a friend of mine brought a non-Orthodox acquaintance from work to the cemetery on Krasnaya gorka. I very distinctly remember him asking us why we put ourselves through this every year. During the blessing of the grave there can be strong emotions, especially if the person recently passed.

In substance, she told him, "As painful as it may be, we never, ever cease to remember and pray for ours." I wish I could remember exactly what she said to him, because it rang so profound that everyone immediately understood the difference between the Orthodox Christians present and the non-Orthodox guest and the American society in which we were living.
 

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One of the things that most folks from Reformed/Anabaptist congregations do not understand is that Lutherans view is that it is understood that when someone passes away the funeral service is the congregation's service, not the family's service. Therefore, we do not say, "Hey, it's your loved one who died, so do what you want." On the contrary, the Pastor (called into his office) is the one who decides what happens in the funeral. For traditional, liturgical Lutherans (the rest actually really aren't Lutheran), that means using the order of worship contained in the "Lutheran Agenda".

If folks want to have slide shows, or family members speaking, they are welcome to do that at the dinner following committal, but most certainly not during the Church's service.
 

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We escort the urn of cremated remains to the military cemetary with horse drawn caisson, and a dirge with pipes and drums, usually Mist Covered Mountains for the precession, Amazing Grace at Graveside. The brief graveside service celebrates the resurrection of the departed from the Book of Miltary Worship, being based upon the Anglican Book of Common Prayer. Celebrating the resurrection with graveside firing party then exiting to pipes and drums playing the joyous exit accompanied by Jonny Cope, Black Bear and Scotland the Brave, and on to the wake...
 

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A couple of members *guard* the house during funeral, visitation, etc. so bad stuff doesn't happen.
It is sad that we live in such a day when this has to be done. This past summer, when a lady from church's house burned down, I learned that there are people who watch the news for this kind of stuff and will show up at night to loot anything of value that remained.
 

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At my church, one of the deacons will let you know what happened, either via a phone call or stopping by, whatever may be more appropriate. Every member of the church is assigned to a deacon for this kind of thing, to ensure that no one got missed (we learned a long time ago that "phone trees" don't work well because for whatever reason someone will drop the ball).

The ladies of the church will get together and plan meals for the family, if needed and as needed. Pastor will usually be heavily involved (as much as they want him to be), offering to be there to give advice in decision making. He'll literally clear his schedule if need be. This is very much a blessing, especially when it was a younger person and an unexpected death, and their family hadn't made any plans or even thought about it, and he's been through many so he's become quite knowledgeable.

Generally there will be a viewing at the church, with usually a slideshow going on at the same time, followed by a memorial service for them at the church, usually consisting of some of their favorite songs, if known, and some testimonies, and then a short message from Pastor, and then usually a dinner to follow. We have often had a bulletin board in the foyer for them for the service, with pictures of them, and then we'll have small pieces of colored paper available on a table for people to write something about them - a favorite memory, for example, and pin it on the board. We'll leave that up for several weeks and then eventually it will be taken down, made into a little presentation box with all the notes inside, and given to the family.

The actual burial is usually just for the family and close friends.
 
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