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Hi Guys!

I am curious what do you think about fish finders. I stumpled upon a site with some great deals for fish finders but i don't know if it is worth spending my money on. The site is http://www.bestfishfinderstore.com
and they got some sweet deals!

Let me know! Thanks! :cool:
 

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If you're fishing from a boat then fish finders can be extremely useful.

Remember that only the most expensive ones can be truly called fish finders, cheaper ones will pick out shoals of baitfish but are unlikly to be able to pick out individual fish.

Perhaps their best feature is in telling you how deep the water is and what structure is down there i.e pinnacles, plateaus, drop offs and weed beds.

It's possible to buy fish finders that you cast out on a rod and line, I wouldn't bother with these though, they seem like a waste of money.
 

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I agree with yorkshire boy,fish finders are very usefull,90% of water dosent hold fish,therfore,useing a fish finder to locate fish on structures,ledges and dropoffs,come in handy.there are also depth finders,witch ive used as well ,they dont show fish ,but will show depth,and contour of the water you are fishing in!I think any serious fisherman would have one of these,as they cut down on fishing water that holds no fish,and you can mark spots with gps
 

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I've had the cheapo Humminbirds,and they actually worked well.My current unit is a Matrix. "Fishfinders" or more accurately,depthfinders,are well worth the money on a boat. If you want to catch fish,you need to find structure.To find structure,you need a sonar.
 

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Used them all the time on the boat. You don't really need one if you know fish are resident.

Here is some gold from a former commercial jigger and long liner:

If fish won't bite, use the color white. If fish are on the attack, the big ones bite black.
 

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When I'm on the boat, my fish finder is on all the time along with the GPS.
If I go over a promising looking area, that spot is saved for future looking into.

Around the area here, any sort of depth reader is essential, due to the shallowness of it all.
The deepest area in the harbor is 30feet, but most of it is a lot shallower.
 

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What??????

I have used a fishfinder( Depthfinder ) Which is a better name. I have used one for at least 30 years. My first one was a Lowrance green box. Never try to find fish always look for the structure that will hold fish. If you look for fish thats what you will spend most of your time doing. If you look for the dropoffs, humps, rockpiles, channels and other structure that holds fish and then make notes at where there at or put on your GPS then you can be more successful. I use as cheap a Depthfinder as I can find. Mine a Eagle Cuda 168. I have $68.00 in mine. Rather spend money on a good rod or reel better yet line or lures than a overpriced fishfinder that I don't need on the boat. Just my opinion from a old river rat living in Texas
 

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Now in the Great Lakes,you use your fishfinder to actually find fish.The fish might be on the bottom,or suspended halfway to the bottom.If you are fishing in 200 feet of water,you don't want to drag your lures 50 feet above or below the fish,or they just won't see them.You need to run them at fish depth.
 

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If you're fishing from a boat then fish finders can be extremely useful.

Remember that only the most expensive ones can be truly called fish finders, cheaper ones will pick out shoals of baitfish but are unlikly to be able to pick out individual fish.

Perhaps their best feature is in telling you how deep the water is and what structure is down there i.e pinnacles, plateaus, drop offs and weed beds.

It's possible to buy fish finders that you cast out on a rod and line, I wouldn't bother with these though, they seem like a waste of money.
I couldnt agree more and feel this is a very accurate assesment of FF's.

I have a 'Cuda 242 mounted on my kayak that I paid a whopping 38.00 fun dollars for on clearence sale at Wally World while considering a signifacantly more expensive model. It works out great for me. It provides such a wealth of info that its hard to imagine hitting the water without it. I would spend the money on a considerably better FF if the possibility of "Turtling" wasnt so high or if I planned to never go BTB's on the coast. However I am really not as interested in finding specific fish as much as I want water depth, Temp, see structure and bottom features.


Here is the one installed on my Prowler 13 from Ocean Kayak...


Mine does a pretty good job of actually picking out fish. It does take a little experience and skill to distinguish between bait fish and a school of suspended bass or crappie, but with practice you can get pretty good at it. Im not as hung up on distinguishing what type of fish I am seeing as I am about thier orientation...ie are they suspended 4 feet over cover in 20 ft of water as this will give me a good starting point for actually finding where the fish are going to likely be and what lures I will need to use to get to them.

As previously mentioned, the fact that even cheap FF's will give you depth, temp and point out bottom features are likely the most important aspect. Without this knowledge you are basically shooting in the dark. Knowing where these features are will allow one to eliminate a lot of unproductive water in short order. Knowing the water temp will also help one in locating fish too as well. Most will also allow you to determine the compisition of the bottom and if it is Sandy, Rocky or somft much bottom. This info alone can often prove important during the spring or species you are chasing.

Another aspect of choosing a FF is the transducer that comes with it. Some will use a 20 degree cone which give a slightly more accurate, but smaller picture of whats below it. This is also good to use in deep water thats deeper that 60ft. In shallower waters a 60 degree transducer will give a wider veiw of whats below it.

I have seen and used the models that you attach to your line and cast out and reel it back in. They are very marginal performance waise and dont provide near the detail one really needs unless your already familar with the area you are fishing and what it looks like under water. They are very rudimentry at best and in my opinon not worth the out lay of fun dollars.

One feature I now wish I had now that I am doing some fishing in costal marshes is a FF with a GPS and one that has a MOB (man over board) feature. This makes locating previous bottom features much easier and the MOB feature can be activated and used to retrace you way back out out a secluded marsh or water way where if your sitting low to the water in unfamilar waters where land marks cant be seen is indespinsible. FF's that have these two features are considerably more expensive and the better ones require that you buy a chip/card to install that covers the areas you are in for the best detail of the area your fishing. These chips often retail for a 100.00 or more dollars per a chip. Storms and wave action and the associated errosion can result in these chips to be updated periodically to keep up to date as changes occur. This may or may not be a worth while feature worthy of the added cost.

Im sure I could add several more paragraphs about this subject but this should give you some basic considerations.
 

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I guess one of the questions that one needs to ask is what do I want it to do. I only need a depthfinder to tell me depth. The water I fish is from 3 to 20 feet and I look for channels, humps, and brushpiles. If I was fishing in a body of water that was 200 ft deep I would have another type of machine. I think that you must look at the Type of water you are going to be on and then match the depthfinder to your situation. But I wouldn't go and put a $1500 machine on a 12 ft jon boat to run the river nor would I put a $68 machine on a ocean going fishing boat. A point that I want to make also is that the machines of today are so far superior to the first machines as far as senitivity
and resolution and power requirements. The price is come down as well so that any body can and if you are serious about fishing can afford a good quality depthfinder.
 

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Like Wood Duck my first locator was a Lowrance Green Box. It taught me how to look for good locations in the beginning and later when I had learned how to read it properly I could actually identify fish in and around structure. Learning a particular species habits t is key to deciding where to locate that particular species. Some prefer brush while others prefer dropoffs and others steep bluffs near a shoreline. I use 3 Lowrance X97's on my boat because I trust them. IMHO knowing your target species habits is equally as important as the locator.

Best to Ya's
 

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I've got a cheap Humminbird. I only use it to know how deep the water is when I take back channels.
I'm with you on this one. The only advantage a FF gives me when on the lake is water depth. That is all I use it for because most of the time a FF will depict floating debris under the water's surface as fish also. If you know fish patterns in each season of the year, all you really need to know is water depth to find fish. Best advice I can give to anyone is know your lake contours and don't rely on a FF for everything.
 

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fish finders are expecially helpful in ice fishing.
I won't ice fish without my vexilar.
 

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fish finders are expecially helpful in ice fishing.
I won't ice fish without my vexilar.
Now that is an exception FX. Have you witnessed the small cameras and monitors used for ice fishing? Now that would be useful tool in any type of fishing situation.
 

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Now that is an exception FX. Have you witnessed the small cameras and monitors used for ice fishing? Now that would be useful tool in any type of fishing situation.
they're getting popular too. You can use the cameras to study the fish, when they're active and so on. I looked through one once and was amazed at how many bass were scaring the fish attracted to the bait.

check out www.iceshanty.com
 

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they're getting popular too. You can use the cameras to study the fish, when they're active and so on. I looked through one once and was amazed at how many bass were scaring the fish attracted to the bait.

check out www.iceshanty.com
Looks to be a very informative site. I have never attempted to ice fish but would like to give it a try sometime.
 
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