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The reason why this concerns me is that in the case of total disaster, I should not be worrying about my sugar levels and trying to find insulin to help me. It will reduce my chance of survival by quite a bit if I get it.

Every member of my family has a sweet tooth, and a penchant for fatty foods. I personally signed myself up for a gym, and am now trying to watch my calorie intake to hopefully lose weight. I do not have diabetes yet, but I am a strong contender. I am hoping that by December, I will get back down to a healthy weight for my size.

To anyone else who has this struggle, what are you doing about it? Any tips for a beginner?
 

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Comic, not your lawyer!
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Well, I'm not a doctor but it should be straight forward. Cut processed sugars, processed foods, and starches (sodas, sweets, white breads and rice, candies, junk food, all fast food, etc.), eat a balanced diet high in raw/cooked veggies, and exercise. There, I've done the bulk of the research for you.
 

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The reason why this concerns me is that in the case of total disaster, I should not be worrying about my sugar levels and trying to find insulin to help me. It will reduce my chance of survival by quite a bit if I get it.

Every member of my family has a sweet tooth, and a penchant for fatty foods. I personally signed myself up for a gym, and am now trying to watch my calorie intake to hopefully lose weight. I do not have diabetes yet, but I am a strong contender. I am hoping that by December, I will get back down to a healthy weight for my size.

To anyone else who has this struggle, what are you doing about it? Any tips for a beginner?
all you can do is adjust your diet and control you sugar intake.

chia sprouts can help regulate blood levels as can some other food.
 

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I am 75 and heavy. Up until I was in my mid 50's I worked weights, ran 25 to 35 miles a week and was a soccer ref. and was heavy. Doctors kept expecting me to develop diabetes but I never did. When they reviewed my history and diet from my late teens until today it turns out that I always had a cup of coffee at my desk. I drank 1 or 2 pots a day. It turns out that there is something in coffee that inhibits diabetes, so I never developed it. I drank coffee decades ago when coffee was thought to be bad for you, but new research says it is not bad. I still drink 3 cups a day.
 

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I'm avoiding dairy, and red meat. Fingers crossed that keeps type 2 diabetes away. I am losing weight and fat on this diet.

I read an article the other day about diabetes. It was about a British study that looked at about 5000 UK females. It was found that those in the group of 5000 that avoided milk were half as likely to have type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome.

Don't know the full details of the study. It might be insightful or it might be rubbish, but on the face of things I thought the study reporting interesting.
 

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Possum Lover
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Popular culture says fatty foods are bad for your blood sugar. They are not.

HIGH CARB foods are DEATH to your body.

I do intermittent fasting and moderate carb as one parent is a type 2, and I am overweight.

Be very careful planning your menu and a 16:8 intermittent fast will help (only eat in an 8 hour window, same time, every day).
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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https://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-causes.html

Type 1 I believe is caused by an autoimmune disorder that causes your own immune system to kill your pancreas. So no more insulin is produced.

Type 2 is mainly due to being overweight and eating junk, causing the body to become insulin resistant.

What causes autoimmune disorders?
I think it is anything that continually insults your immune system, eventually putting it into "overdrive" . Personally, I think it is caused by having way too many vaccinations in one's lifetime. Or continual exposure to allergens.
 

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Concerned
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Short answer is, your calorie intake needs to match (or be less than) your calorie expenditure, and you should eat healthy foods consistently of the correct protein, carb, fat ratio for your body.

Long answer is too long to type (there are entire degree fields that deal with metabolism)

I personally think you are likely stressing too much over this. As long as you live as healthy a life as possible then you are doing what you can to prevent it, and shouldn't worry any more about developing diabetes than you would about a random cancer.

To go back to something else you mentioned, if you are insulin dependent them you will be in alot of trouble in SHTF, and likely not survive in a prolonged society collapse. I have family members who are insulin dependent and have looked into produceing my own from sheep or bovine, if necessary, and reached the sad conclusion that it is really not possible on the needed scale.

The book One Second After has alot of good medical insight, and specifically considers diabetes. It's a great read and chillingly realistic.
 

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Dog Lives Matter
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Popular culture says fatty foods are bad for your blood sugar. They are not.

HIGH CARB foods are DEATH to your body.

I do intermittent fasting and moderate carb as one parent is a type 2, and I am overweight.

Be very careful planning your menu and a 16:8 intermittent fast will help (only eat in an 8 hour window, same time, every day).
The most effective diet that I've seen that is also beneficial for borderline diabetics is the South Beach Diet. It focuses on the glycemic index for foods, which is basically a measure of how fast a food item turn into sugars when consumed.

The three most evil foods with this diet are white rice, white potatoes, and white bread. They all contain bad carbs.

There are different levels with this diet. You can move up and down the levels depending upon how it's meeting your weight loss goals. Unlike the Atkins diet, you don't gain the weight loss back when you go off the diet as along as you avoid sugars and bad carbs.

This is one of those diets where you can have a hamburger as long as you throw away the bun. We eat hamburgers and turkey burgers cooked on the grill and eaten like steaks. They actually taste better that way.
 

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Listen to the ghosts
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Exercise & lose weight. Down to a reasonable weight, of course. Either exercising or losing weight alone will help, but since they go together well, might as well do both at the same time.

And, as others have mentioned, diet.

One really, really easy thing to do is cut out the cokes, even diet cokes, and sweets.

That will be a good start.
 

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Indefatigable
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Everything in moderation, if your grandma or great grandma didn't have it in her kitchen, don't have it in yours. And BTW, I think genes go along way. On my NA side, everyone was a bean pole who ate like pigs, sweets included, but not store bought, refined, processed crap. Not ONE case of diabetes.
 

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We are lucky to live in a time when there's plenty of research available on diabetes prevention, so there's plenty one can do.

First and foremost I agree about the cutting back on simple carbs. I do not see myself going the Keto diet route, but have replaced most of my bread, pasta, rice and potatoes with salads and vegetables. I probably need to cut a tiny bit on red meat as well, but avoiding processed foods and eating well goes far.

Research intermittent fasting. Taking plenty of small meals puts strain on the pancreas and increases insulin resistance in your bodies cells, creating more insulin until that no longer works and your sugar spikes. The Covid lockdown has really helped me in this regard as it made it easier to schedule my meals. I try to do at least one period of 14-16 hours each day where I do not eat (includes sleep time) and aside from the occasional craving for a snack or drink in the evening that's easy enough to say no to, it hasn't been all that hard.

In terms of exercise, middle aged men are generally better served by a combination of weight training and endurance training (i.e. long walks, perhaps with a BOB in tow). While more intense running may have a place, that form of exercise can stimulate or repress the wrong set of hormones in a middle aged man so that the weight loss return on the effort expended might not be optimal.

One other tip from a fellow sweet-tooth. I sweeten my coffee with quality maple syrup. A little goes a long way in terms of flavour and it is not as bad on the pancreas as regular sugar.

I had only the beginnings of middle aged flabbiness up until the covid lockdown, but discovered during the down time that good eating, intermittent fasting and somewhat regular exercise and hikes with my pack brought me back to where I was before the flabbiness started to show. I am sure it will pay off in arresting the development of type two diabetes that hit my father when he reached 50.
 

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Simple: eat less, exercise more, avoid salt, white sugar and fried food. Stop smoking or using tobacco products.

Yype2 diabetes largely disappears, blood pressure drops, heart desease drops, cancer still goes on because of car exhaust...

Next time you see an obese persion in a motoized cart loaded down with crap food at a grocery store, that person literally represents food out of a poor kids mouth.
 

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Look into Dr. Jason Fung.

Look into fasting and limiting processed carbohydrates. The old low-fat diet advice is coming into question and medicine will only change with new generations of doctors.

MDs have essentially no training in nutrition. Don't trust your GP on nutrition. I know a MD who told me had a total of 5 lectures in medical school on diet.

Intermittent fasting forces the body to convert fat into glucose to feed the cells which moderates insulin levels, preventing diabetes. Once you get used to it, it's not that hard to skip breakfast or even lunch every day(at least for me. YMMV)
 

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His ideas today go against conventional thinking, but Dr. Walter Kempner of Duke University saw wonderful results for diabetes type 2 patients with his rice, fruit juice and sugar diet. It's hard to believe but a diet high in sugars and carbs was resulting in improvements for most, but not all, of his diabetes patients. He was famous in his time with celebrities visiting his clinic for treatment.

A write up on his work, with some pictures of a few patient results can be seen here:


"Walter Kempner, MD—Founder of the Rice Diet"

https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2013nl/dec/kempner.pdf
 
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