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I've been buying some survival things here and there but I want some kind of list of most, if not all, the things I might want to have in a bug out bag.

First thing is the bag itself. What are some good brands/bags I should be looking at and where do I find them?

Second thing is fire. I want to get the "best" magnesium fire starter plus some strike anywhere matches and some type of kimber of something.

Third thing is water. I'm guessing I'll need a canteen and some water purification tablets. What are some good brands?

Forth is shelter. I don't really know what I'll need for this one but I was thinking maybe some space blackets and rope for a start.

Fifth is a first aid kit. Which one is the best?

This is just a small list of things I know I'll need. Feel free to list any additional catorgories I left out.
 

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All I can suggest is the way I've gone about it. What I did was just educate yourself with the Internet, and I also have gone back to my own camping experiences and tried to remember what I needed and didn't need in order to get my packs more "efficient"
Also, with looking at other peoples examples here on the forum you can start to get an idea of what you are going to need and what would be nice to have.
To my mind an awful lot of it depends on your individual situation and where you are, what you plan to do in any given situation and who you have to take care of if any at all.
In my situation, I have my wife and 5 year old child to think about and plan for, also, if there was a SHTF situation where I live, I have seriously given thought to an evacuation, and where I would go, what I would need once I got there, and how much stuff I would need for the amount of time I would have to fend for my family in a worst case scenario.
One post I found to be more than helpful and thought provoking here was in the Reviews section. It is authored by PLA and is titled, Gear, what you carry.
Read through that and start to see where his point of view is coming from and it may help you start the thought process in the right direction.

Good luck,

Scott
 

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Welcome Larry...

Ditto on the advise above.

A bit of self reliance is also a good thing to acquire as far as a mindset too.

I'd not worry so much about the "best" fire starter. Hell, there's not much to them. Read reviews and order a couple.

A "best" first aid kit is sort of up to you based upon personal needs and budget. I don't like most commercially thrown together ones (not that I've seen every one or even most of them). There are medical kits that are set up for platoons.

I just ordered on Monday sutures, scalpels and various other tools to make our first aid setup more advanced. This isn't so much for BOB but for home use.

I spent a lot of time on my order because I wanted to find a med supply company selling BOTH sutures and scalpels to reduce the shipping costs but I ended up getting everything from amazon.com, paid a little more on shipping because some of the items came from different vendors but at least I got what I wanted.

Some things I think depends on your expertise or at least your willingness to increase your expertise. Some of the things I may put in my first aid kit, other's may not be comfortable with. Others may have more advanced things in their kit that I wouldn't be comfortable with. There are different levels of everything and your needs (where do you intend to USE your stuff in your bag?)

Climate, distance, logistical challenges (map, gps), threats (people, animals, scorpions, snakes, skeeters) lighting, a$$ wipe.

I think mental rehearsal is vital. Imagine camping trips from hell. Imagine being cold and hungry somewhere. Imagine things breaking and needing to fix them. (zip ties, duct tape, cordage)

I don't think it's as much the specific things in the bag as it is the knowledge of the circumstances for priorities.
 

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Welcome Larry...

Ditto on the advise above.

majorsurplusnsurvial.com is a company I've been using since the late 80's. Look at their firestarter stuff. You can't go wrong.

I'd not worry so much about the "best" fire starter. Hell, there's not much to them. Read reviews and order a couple.

A "best" first aid kit is sort of up to you based upon personal needs and budget. I don't like most commercially thrown together ones (not that I've seen every one or even most of them). There are medical kits that are set up for platoons.

I just ordered on Monday sutures, scalpels and various other tools to make our first aid setup more advanced. This isn't so much for BOB but for home use.

I spent a lot of time on my order because I wanted to find a med supply company selling BOTH sutures and scalpels to reduce the shipping costs but I ended up getting everything from amazon.com, paid a little more on shipping because some of the items came from different vendors but at least I got what I wanted.

Some things I think depends on your expertise or at least your willingness to increase your expertise. Some of the things I may put in my first aid kit, other's may not be comfortable with. Others may have more advanced things in their kit that I wouldn't be comfortable with. There are different levels of everything and your needs (where do you intend to USE your stuff in your bag?)

Climate, distance, logistical challenges (map, gps), threats (people, animals, scorpions, snakes, skeeters) lighting, a$$ wipe.

I think mental rehearsal is vital. Imagine camping trips from hell. Imagine being cold and hungry somewhere. Imagine things breaking and needing to fix them. (zip ties, duct tape, cordage)

I don't think it's as much the specific things in the bag as it is the knowledge of the circumstances for priorities.
 

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Gone Fishin'
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try searching and reading the forum. There are hundreds if not thousands of exisiting threads with lists and photos on B.O.B.s
 

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Welcome Larry,
Flagg and Boomers are right on. For a BOB, you have to tailor your gear to your circumstances, i.e. skills, dependancies, location. Although I won't go in to it here, you also need to consider the very likely option of bugging IN.
As far as fire goes, Flagg is dead on- there isn't much to them, but be sure to throw some disposable lighters in there as well.
For water, fire, and shelter, I have backups for my backups. I have several options for fire. For water, I have several 2-gallon ziplock freezer bags, a 1.5 liter nalgene bottle, plastic sheeting (3 mil) which is good for shelter as well, and a million other things.
For shelter, I have a tube tent, emergency bivy (don't get the super-cheap space blankets), and as I said, the plastic sheeting.
\As to the first aid kit... well, that's a whole subject in itself, as stated above. I would suggest making your own, as most pre-packaged kits are about 99% bandaids. I haven't used a bandaid since I was 11. I'm 37. Fill up all that space with things like benadryl (which is far more helpful than one might think. Do some research), alcohol, aspirin, sinus medicine, gauze, and superglue. If you get a small cut, superglue (or similar) works really well in a pinch. But as boomerscaboose said, it is almost entirely dependant on your skill level. The Red Cross offers pretty decent classes for the layman, at the end of which you'll get a certification. Pretty cheap and well worth it.
I'll go further than Boomers and say don't just practice in your mind, practice physically.
Bandage your cat. Instead of watching Madmen or whatever, go to your local woods and goof around. You don't even have to camp. You can get all the knowledge there is on the internet, but wisdom comes from experience.
Good luck
 

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First thing is the bag itself. Second thing is fire. Third thing is water. Forth is shelter. Fifth is a first aid kit.
Good basic list, and as many have said, it needs to be tailored to you, your skills, and lets face it - what level of quality of life you hope to achieve. Me, I go minimalist as much as possible, and try even now to minimize requirements for my own survival & comfort. Expectations management is a very important skill for a prepper.

Bag - I am using a 5.11 Rush 24, but I'm in a mild clime. I like an ALICE for more gear - but I've seen folks build a BOB they couldn't carry long distance over time.
Fire - learn how to make fire without tools, and carry a starter.
Water - learn how to find clean water. Long term use of tabs will take its toll on your body, and filters only last for a while. Learn how to make a BioSandFilter if you you're going to stay put for any amount of time.
Shelter - most of the homeless guys I know are using a 10x10 tarp. A heavy mil plastic drop cloth will work too, and can replace the rigid board in your pack.
First Aid - think trauma kit, not owie kit. Take an EMS class if you can.
6th is a weapon.
 

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First thing is the bag itself. What are some good brands/bags I should be looking at and where do I find them?
You've listed this as first but I'd propose you consider making it closer to last.

I started with bags (Camelbak hydration packs) but am now getting new packs as the lack of frame and smaller size makes them a bit too small for my needs (so they're over-stuffed) and uncomfortable to carry.

I'd get an idea of what all you want to carry then size the bag accordingly. There's a lot of considerations when getting a pack. E.g. My terrain is hilly and filled with woods and brush. For my needs, a pack that holds everything inside with as few "things" on the outside which could cause snagging is my current need so I'm going with the following:

ALPS Mountaineering Denali Backpack for me.


Gregory Z65 Backpacks for the wife and daughter.
 

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Water - some kind of water filter. Water purification tablets are ok, but some people have allergic reactions to iodine. And how much are you willing to spend? This is a pretty big topic that covers everything from a Katadyn to a berkey.

Personally, I would start off with a berkey and go from there.




Shelter - how many people and how much money do you want to spend? My son has a wenzel lone tree hiker tent. I thinks its probably one of the best tents out there for less then $50.

Amazon.com: Wenzel Lone Tree Hiker Tent: Sports & Outdoors

First aid kits - FUNDAMENTALS First Aid Kit from http://www.redflarekits.com/

 

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Ding... Thanks for playin
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"Dare to Prepare" book by Holly Deyo
 

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Kibitzer
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First thing is the bag itself. What are some good brands/bags I should be looking at and where do I find them?
On another site some guy posted that he went out and bought a BOB.
So, I asked him if he got a medium or large one, with or without a frame?
Did it say BOB on side?
Did he ask people at store where the BOBs were?
Did they steer him to the suitcase or camping section?

He never answered.
 

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Buy the bag last, otherwise you will end up trying to get by with what will fit in the bag.

Kev, +1 on the Wenzel Lone Tree Hiker tent. I have one and it is holding up just fine and rolls up to a nice compact size. A simple tarp shelter can be quite comfortable if it is set up right. I actually prefer a tarp for cold weather if you have plenty of fire wood. I mostly use the tent though in summer because of the bugs.

Toss in a couple Bic lighters in your fire kit in addition to your steel.

Water: I carry either a canteen or a couple of Nalgene bottles depending on how long I am going to be out. My bug out bag is also my backpacking bag so it gets used a lot and is always loaded with the correct gear for the season. You can get a stainless cup that will store compactly right on the end of a Nalgene bottle or go with the old military canteen cup.

For a water filter I carry a Berkey Sport bottle that I bought from a site sponsor through one of his ebay auctions. Paid $16.00 for it including shipping.

You didn't mention lighting, but a good LED headlamp is handy for setting up camp and doing chores after dark if you need to. I also carry a much brighter flashlight (which also has shorter battery run time) in case I need to see longer distances for short periods of time.
 

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Buy the bag last, otherwise you will end up trying to get by with what will fit in the bag.
A guy on another site said to buy pack and if your gear was too much, go buy a bigger pack.
I said to buy big pack to start off with. You don't have to fill it up.
You might need extra space for stuff you may pick up later.
If anything, it will hold your jacket when you don't need it.
 

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I'm the boogey man.......
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Figure out everything you think you're going to need, THEN get a pack that holds it all.

Or be lazy like me and just pick up a Molle II Rucksack
 
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Contents Under Pressure
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First off.... Welcome to the boards.

Here is my 2 cents. I realize other people's opinions may vary.

Bag - This really depends on your situation. Do you want a civilian bag or a military bag? Civilian blends in better, but military gear is built tougher. I personally use two bags.

http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/MOLLE401-1.html
The first is a Condor Outdoor sling bag (not a bad bag at all). This is my "get home bag". It's OD green and lives in the trunk of my car. It's intended purpose is to get me back home. 3 days worth maximum.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=47472
My traditional "Bug Out Bag" is a modified medium ALICE pack. Bugging out is not a good Plan A. I think a lot of people are going to die by doing this. I plan on bugging in, but God forbid that I have to leave for whatever reason, this is the bag that I'll use. You can find them pretty cheap on eBay. Another great option would be the MOLLE Rifleman's pack set up. Allegheny Surplus Outlet has some awesome deals on them.

Fire - I don't think there really is a "best" magnesium fire starter. Magnesium causes a spark when struck with steel. There's really not much more to it than that. Check out the Blastmatch or Google "Sweedish Fire Steel". Bic lighters are good too (if kept dry). Always have more than one way to make fire.

Water - This is the most important (and often overlooked) aspect to survival. My GHB has a 3 liter bladder, and my ALICE has two 1qt canteens strapped to the sides. (bladder goes in the ALICE too, if I have to use it) For a filter, I use a Katadyn hiker pro. I also have a bottle of Polar Pure in each bag. Bear in mind about what Kevin said about allergies to iodine....everyone is different.

Amazon.com: Polar Pure Water Disinfectant With Iodine Crystals: Sports & Outdoors

Shelter - I use a USGI modular sleep system and a tarp. I also have a poncho, poncho liner, and some 550 cord. That's what I use. I think a tent would be a great idea for the summer as bugs will ruin your sleep real quick.

First Aid Kit - The best (and cheapest) first aid kit is the one you put together your self. I have a trauma kit on my chest rig, and a more traditional kit in both of my bags. Don't forget about hygiene. Toothpaste, spare glasses/contacts, baby wipes, hand sanitizer, etc. Two great places for first aid supplies (that have very reasonable shipping) are

http://www.first-aid-product.com/
http://www.remotemedical.com/


Everyone's situation is different. Make sure that you have a plan first. A bug out bag with nowhere to bug out to makes you a refugee. We usually hear about them in the news......

The most important piece of advice that I could give you is to save up and buy quality gear. You don't want your shoulder straps on the bag breaking in the middle of the woods. You definitely don't want to go cheap on your water purification. It will be a lot less expensive (and less frustrating) for you to buy high quality gear the first time around. eBay is usually a good place to start.

Also check out YouTube. There are a LOT of Bug Out Bag videos to watch there. Very good for getting ideas.


Hope This Helps,

Pro-Pain
 

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...I'll go further than Boomers and say don't just practice in your mind, practice physically.
Bandage your cat. Instead of watching Madmen or whatever, go to your local woods and goof around. You don't even have to camp. You can get all the knowledge there is on the internet, but wisdom comes from experience...
I was thinking that myself last night (as i was wasting time playing Diablo II on my PC). I waste a ton of time on things that are pretty much brain drains. What can I be doing every day that will improve myself? Not even limiting it to a prep standpoint, but professionally, healthwise, mentally/intellectually, etc...
 

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I am Defendor
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I've been buying some survival things here and there but I want some kind of list of most, if not all, the things I might want to have in a bug out bag.

First thing is the bag itself. What are some good brands/bags I should be looking at and where do I find them?

Second thing is fire. I want to get the "best" magnesium fire starter plus some strike anywhere matches and some type of kimber of something.

Third thing is water. I'm guessing I'll need a canteen and some water purification tablets. What are some good brands?

Forth is shelter. I don't really know what I'll need for this one but I was thinking maybe some space blackets and rope for a start.

Fifth is a first aid kit. Which one is the best?

This is just a small list of things I know I'll need. Feel free to list any additional catorgories I left out.
First buy a cheap bag less than $15, and a compass
Second get some basic first aid supplies forget about kits they are full of bandaids and crap get some items that paramedics use.
third get some water bottles and some duct tape
forth get a rain poncho some cheap tent poles and stakes and paracord, get a wool blanket or 2
fifth get a good quality survival knife and a hand axe, and something to pry with
sixth get a good climbing rope, and good carbiners not the cheap non locking type you cannot lift any weight with them.
seventh get some dehydrated food and peanut butter and sardines.
 

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This site sucks
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One reason I hate forums. What do I need? How is my bag? I have been on this forum for one month and have read every post. How many bags and list are on here. I admire the ones that have been here for how long. NEWBIES should just read and search.
 

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One reason I hate forums. What do I need? How is my bag? I have been on this forum for one month and have read every post. How many bags and list are on here. I admire the ones that have been here for how long. NEWBIES should just read and search.
IMHO, people (ie. you) shouldn't be an a*s*h*le. You ever heard of tact? Instead of degrading a member how about suggesting the use of the search function. Maybe toss in a couple hints since BOB isn't a valid search. You made it a point to visit, read and reply to this thread but offered nothing other than trying to degrade another member and trying to make yourself look like gods gift to forums and search arguments.

Look at the thread title. "What do I need to start my BOB?". If your response (quoted above) is the best you can offer to a thread, you're the the one that's the forum idiot.

Contribute or move on, preferably without comment.
 
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