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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys i am a big ol noob to this forum. A little history i was raised a poor farm kid in western Oregon so then joined the army got out after 7 years. So i have a little bit of know how on my shoulders.

So on to my question. i moved to northern Montana for work where i am totally unfamiliar with EVERYTHING. it snows a lot, its cold as ****, in the summer the bugs thick as the snow in winter, and if your not a cowboy or an Indian you stick out like a sore thumb.

anyway now on to the question lol. the power went out and i seen just how unprepared i was. i have mres, water, some the basics. But i didnt have a way to cook food or stay warm. i have been looking at the Coleman cook stoves. I like the idea of the duel fuel cook stove and lantern. it uses coleman fuel or gasoline. and off of one gallon of fuel it does what 4 and a half little propane bottles does. now my question is i need to use it inside my house some time, with a cracked window will i be ok using either of them? same goes for the lantern.

all advice is more than welcome. thanks guys, sorry for the rant for a simple question.
 

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CTP
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Not a stove expert but will opine.

Use inside? Maybe if it was absolutely necessary for a short period. Just be careful. If you do it inside and have to open windows you may as well just take the 15 minutes, step outside occasionally to cook, flip, etc and go back inside.

If it is for cooking in an emergency situations like power outages I would look at the propane cook tops that are generally made of cast iron and have three burners. Generally have four legs as supports and run off a typical propane cylinder. Some thing like below.

http://www.google.com/products/cata...a=X&ei=oBloT57_HqqciAKR04yOBw&ved=0CEoQ8gIwAA
 

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Stove...inside...yes...JUST FOR COOKING!!!

Lantern...inside...NEVER!!!!!!!!!!

For inside lighting...look into the Coleman "D" cell battery lanterns or oil lamps.

And candles as well...it helps to have several different types of back-up cooking and lighting sources. I have several and am always looking for more.

DON'T EVER USE A COLEMAN LANTERN INDOORS!!!!!!! Very bad news:eek:

If you HAVE to...bring it in from outside...get yer work done...then take it back outside ASAP...:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok guys im tracking. place the cook stove outside. So a good kerosine lantern is the way to go then? i have a good deal of candles so far. Sorry i sorta have a problem with battery powered stuff save flashlights and radios.

What about Sterno, just for boiling water and quick uses?

so these other propane stoves, are they as efficient as the dual fuel stove? seems like when times get tough fuel will be easier to find and or make then getting your hands on propane.
 

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Get a volcano stove and a propane stove. I would also have a small stove designed specifically for backpacking to boil water fast.
 

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Reformed Christian
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I use a small backpacking butane stove from Brunton (part of my bug out bag) I love it.

http://ca.wholesalesports.com/store...foldable-butane-canister-stove/prod93788.html

(actually it fits in a little holster about 3 inches by 2 inches that you can wear on your belt without even noticing)..... It is a little rocket when it comes to quick heating. amazing stove and cheap. I average one $5 butane cannister for a 3 day camping trip or power outage.

I also have a Coleman stove that I burn coleman fuel or unleaded gas (unleaded gas dosn't burn as well and is dirty, but does work)

Another good alternative for someone on a budget or looking for ultralight stove for a BOB is a 'penny stove'. I used to use these for backpacking.

http://www.jureystudio.com/pennystove/

I plan on also getting a propane coleman to build greater redundancy and use some of the propane I've been stocking for my BBQ or Mr. Heater
 

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Tough Chick
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My recommendation? Go with a higher-end brand than Coleman or get a small backpack propane stove cheap.

I spent big $$ to get a nice 2-burner Coleman only to have the thing blow up and nearly burn our deck, my husband, and our house. I am never ever going to buy another Coleman stove again in my life. Their newer products are junk and worthy only of the trash heap.

If you can manage to get a really old model one at a flea market or garage sale, those were actually built to last and are worth having. Otherwise, look at any other propane stove.

Of course, YMMV, but caveat emptor on this one.
 

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I believe in Sterno! If you have a good-quality thermos (I have a half-gallon one) you can boil a bunch of water, keep it in the thermos, and have hot water for beverages, oatmeal, freeze-dried food, or whatever. You can burn it indoors. I'd have some at least for back-up.
 

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I've got the propane coleman with one burner and the grill. Great stove and the grill is really handy.
I also have a 2 burner typical naptha 'coleman stove' .

Without actually comparing things, I was thinking that the naptha stove was the better, more reliable, cheaper, etc.

After really thinking, the propane comes out a winner..

Cost:

You say a gallon of fuel will do the same as 4.5 bottles of propane.
I just went to buy a gallon of stove fuel this weekend. $19.99 :eek:
4.5 bottles of propane would be cheaper. (a 3-pack was $13)

The naptha stoves can leak. This weekend mine started dripping at the seal at the red knob. I was heating water for coffee and I could smell raw fuel...drip drip...
The trouble with those leaks is that the flame will ignite the vapour. I have already had a 2 burner typical coleman stove, and a 1-burner coleman develop a leak and catch fire.

Naptha stoves stink when you light it and shut it off. If you're using it inside, it'll smell up the house. (IF you're using it inside..the carbon monoxide stuff has already been mentioned)

You can get the fittings and stuff to connect a 20 lbs tank to the propane stoves and lanterns. Get a couple 20 lbs tanks and you're good or a LONG time. And propane from BBQ's can be found at just about every house in SHTF conditions. I'd think naptha would be nearly impossible to find. 20lbs tanks could also be filled at filling stations (with a generator for power) in emergency times, naptha would have to come from...well, somewhere.
There's also a kit to refill the small bottles from a 20LBS (or larger) bottle. It's not ideal, but in SHTF you could bring your small bottles to the large tank and fill them up yourself. (Options, anyway..)

I've never had a part break or wear out on a propane stove or lantern. I have had both two-burner stoves and one 1-burner stove leak fuel while in use. I've also had to replace the leather pump seal in 2 stoves.
In fairness, my propane stuff is a fair amount newer than the naptha stoves, but after really thinking about it, I think propane is the better option.
 

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Or get a pressure canner and cook and can your own food ahead of time. That way you can enjoy all the cooked meat you want without your hungry neighbors smelling that you have food and supplies.

And you can get battery powered lights for inside. Use rechargeable batteries and get a hand crank charger, or a solar charger to recharge them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've got the propane coleman with one burner and the grill. Great stove and the grill is really handy.
I also have a 2 burner typical naptha 'coleman stove' .

Without actually comparing things, I was thinking that the naptha stove was the better, more reliable, cheaper, etc.

After really thinking, the propane comes out a winner..

Cost:

You say a gallon of fuel will do the same as 4.5 bottles of propane.
I just went to buy a gallon of stove fuel this weekend. $19.99 :eek:
4.5 bottles of propane would be cheaper. (a 3-pack was $13)

The naptha stoves can leak. This weekend mine started dripping at the seal at the red knob. I was heating water for coffee and I could smell raw fuel...drip drip...
The trouble with those leaks is that the flame will ignite the vapour. I have already had a 2 burner typical coleman stove, and a 1-burner coleman develop a leak and catch fire.

Naptha stoves stink when you light it and shut it off. If you're using it inside, it'll smell up the house. (IF you're using it inside..the carbon monoxide stuff has already been mentioned)

You can get the fittings and stuff to connect a 20 lbs tank to the propane stoves and lanterns. Get a couple 20 lbs tanks and you're good or a LONG time. And propane from BBQ's can be found at just about every house in SHTF conditions. I'd think naptha would be nearly impossible to find. 20lbs tanks could also be filled at filling stations (with a generator for power) in emergency times, naptha would have to come from...well, somewhere.
There's also a kit to refill the small bottles from a 20LBS (or larger) bottle. It's not ideal, but in SHTF you could bring your small bottles to the large tank and fill them up yourself. (Options, anyway..)

I've never had a part break or wear out on a propane stove or lantern. I have had both two-burner stoves and one 1-burner stove leak fuel while in use. I've also had to replace the leather pump seal in 2 stoves.
In fairness, my propane stuff is a fair amount newer than the naptha stoves, but after really thinking about it, I think propane is the better option.
coleman cooking fuel 9.95 at walmart
 

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I am partial to the coleman propane stoves.

I have the Coleman PerfectFlow insta-Start grill stove, the one with the built on griddle. After cooking some sausage on the griddle, the grease drain pan almost filled up, and the griddle was difficult to clean. The grease dried in the corners of the griddle and was difficult to get out.


A buddy of mine has the coleman perfect flow store without the griddle. Adjusting the gas was a little difficult, as the burner was to be all the way on, or off, there seemed to be almost no fine adjustment.


If I was going to buy another camp stove, I would go with a coleman liquid fuel stove, and then buy a propane adapter for it. This gives you the ability to use liquid fuel or propane.
 

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Like Kev said, you can buy the Coleman Gasoline stove and for another $27.00 add the propane regulator. Propane would be much safer to use indoors if you had to. I would never use the gasoline type indoors.

Propane lamp or lantern or LED lantern for light.

For emergency heat the Mr Heater Big Buddy heaters work great.
 

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The best Coleman stove is the one you get at the recycling yard for a buck...I just cant not pick them up...I have about a dozen of them... The older ones will burn automotive gas, but the generators can clog over time...I mix Coleman fuel and gas at a 50-50 ratio, and have had no problems...Rumor and legend has it that adding a cap full of carb cleaner/tank helps...On the propane converter...get the one that hooks to a standard tank...forget those small bottles. Small tanks in the 1-3 gallon gange are available at home depot etc...they are quite handy.
Operating Coleman stoves and lanterns are not for the feeble minded, and do take a little common sense and finesse... For the price of a goodwill unit and some new parts... cap, pump and a generator (if needed), you will save enough to buy the propane converter...The majority of the ones I got from the dump, just needed the pump leathers oiled, a good cleanup, and they fired right up...not bad for a buck...

Edit: Go get some brass stock about 1 inch wide and 1/8" thick Take two pieces 1-1/2 long bend them over a bolt slightly smaller than the generator so that you end up with two flat pieces with a hump in the middle. Drill a hole on both sides of the hump, and bolt them (using brass screws) around your generator. Install so that they are over the flame of the burner on the tank side. This will increase the amount of heat applied to the generator In essence this convert the old style stove to dual fuel, as the only important difference is that the dual fuel has a larger diameter generator (More surface area) ...Coleman was smart and changed the valve enough to make it impossible to install the dual fuel generator on older stoves. I have these devices on my stoves and lanterns and have no problem running straight up auto gas...This mod part was commercially available many years ago, but I haven't seen them in a while, so I had to build my own.
 

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All of what I am about to offer will depend on whether you have wood, fuel or whatever available when the power goes out.

I'd consider a yukon style stove as well. the military surplus models run about $140 in the US. they can burn wood or diesel fuel and can be adapted to run bio diesel. they will give you heat for warmth and for cooking. there are several makes and models but IMHO they are worth having. just prepare them for use when the weather is nice and not when it's winter and you need heat now.

i personally prefer the multi fuel coleman for camp stoves. i have two single burners that i loan out often to my buddies who only camp once a season.

For light i have a multi fuel lantern, several kerosene lamps, candles and rechargeable crank lanterns/radios.

lugged both the lantern and stove or like items across the world with me when i was in the army. worth every bit of their weight

Hope these help you decide
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
All of what I am about to offer will depend on whether you have wood, fuel or whatever available when the power goes out.

I'd consider a yukon style stove as well. the military surplus models run about $140 in the US. they can burn wood or diesel fuel and can be adapted to run bio diesel. they will give you heat for warmth and for cooking. there are several makes and models but IMHO they are worth having. just prepare them for use when the weather is nice and not when it's winter and you need heat now.

i personally prefer the multi fuel coleman for camp stoves. i have two single burners that i loan out often to my buddies who only camp once a season.

For light i have a multi fuel lantern, several kerosene lamps, candles and rechargeable crank lanterns/radios.

lugged both the lantern and stove or like items across the world with me when i was in the army. worth every bit of their weight

Hope these help you decide
I like what you are laying down man. been most helpful. pretty sure i will get the duel fuel. Now can you tell me what kerosene lamps you would go for? im thinking coleman as well?
 
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