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Discussion Starter #1
For the last 2 years or so 2-3 times a week I have been experimenting with using home ground wholewheat for cooking. I have come up with ways to use it that are palatable but the family aren't huge fans of it(I can't blame them)

Recently I have begun experimenting with using whole wheat berries mostly using them in the way a person would use pearled barley. I have found boiling them with salt and lots of garlic, onion and cumin they can almost be used as a ground beef substitute in soups.

And they can also be used in place of rice in rice pudding.

I recently came across wheat berry pudding that I haven't made yet but looks easy and should taste good. Here is a link to one that uses maple syrup as a sweetener(we have many gallons of maple syrup stored and always look for ways to use it up) https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/wheat-berry-pudding

Then their is also parched and salt fried wheat which is pretty good.

What other ways can a person use whole or coarsely ground wheat berries in meals? The reason I ask is because it takes a fair amount of time to grind a large amount of wheat fine enough for breads and the final results aren't the best. Using whole wheat berries would be much easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Unless I'm mistaken cracked grains were heavily used in the middle ages for soups and stews. Merely cracking the grain is easier and faster than milling it into flour. I'd try that and see how it works.
That is worth a try. I assume it would end up making something similar to steel cut oatmeal(depending on how thick it is made)
 

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Sprout it and make Ezekiel bread
I was going to try that a couple years ago but my wife brought some home from the store about that time and I was unimpressed by it. I may have to revisit it though. As far as I am concerned the more ways I know how to cook my preps the better, even if I don't particularly like some of the ways simply knowing how may be helpful.
 

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For the last 2 years or so 2-3 times a week I have been experimenting with using home ground wholewheat for cooking. I have come up with ways to use it that are palatable but the family aren't huge fans of it(I can't blame them)

Recently I have begun experimenting with using whole wheat berries mostly using them in the way a person would use pearled barley. I have found boiling them with salt and lots of garlic, onion and cumin they can almost be used as a ground beef substitute in soups.

And they can also be used in place of rice in rice pudding.

I recently came across wheat berry pudding that I haven't made yet but looks easy and should taste good. Here is a link to one that uses maple syrup as a sweetener(we have many gallons of maple syrup stored and always look for ways to use it up) https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/wheat-berry-pudding

Then their is also parched and salt fried wheat which is pretty good.

What other ways can a person use whole or coarsely ground wheat berries in meals? The reason I ask is because it takes a fair amount of time to grind a large amount of wheat fine enough for breads and the final results aren't the best. Using whole wheat berries would be much easier.
On E-Bay from $4--$8, you can find "Passport to Survival", by Esther ****ey. This tells you everything you could ever want to make out of wheat berries, to pressure cooked cereal to artificial meat. I've lot the book in many moves, but back in the 70's it was the to-have book. I tried a lot of meal in it and the artificial meat was pretty amazing. Needed beef bouillon. I thought the taste good. One year I took a wheat berry--pineapple pudding to a Mormon potluck, and people loved it. With additives like canned pumpkin or any kind of fruit, you can make cheap, yummy puddings.
 

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I was going to try that a couple years ago but my wife brought some home from the store about that time and I was unimpressed by it. I may have to revisit it though. As far as I am concerned the more ways I know how to cook my preps the better, even if I don't particularly like some of the ways simply knowing how may be helpful.
You can sprout wheat and keep cutting off the wheat grass for salad.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
On E-Bay from $4--$8, you can find "Passport to Survival", by Esther ****ey. This tells you everything you could ever want to make out of wheat berries, to pressure cooked cereal to artificial meat. I've lot the book in many moves, but back in the 70's it was the to-have book. I tried a lot of meal in it and the artificial meat was pretty amazing. Needed beef bouillon. I thought the taste good. One year I took a wheat berry--pineapple pudding to a Mormon potluck, and people loved it. With additives like canned pumpkin or any kind of fruit, you can make cheap, yummy puddings.
I will have to look into it it. It could be a useful book.

Edit: I looked that book up. I was able to find a website where I could page through some of the pages. WOW! it is an amazing book. It contains so much information with very few ingredients. I ordered a used copy of the book. I don't necessary intend to follow her recipes but more as a starting point to see what is possible. Thank you for the suggestion.
 

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You can sprout wheat and keep cutting off the wheat grass for salad.
I am pretty sure I tried wheat sprouts last winter and was less than pleased with the results. Although fresh greens may become very welcome when living off stored foods in the winter.

I also routinely sprout wheat for fodder for my rabbits in winter and for malting as the beginning process of making malt syrup.

Even if I don't care for your ideas they are all good ideas and I appreciate them. Keep them coming.
 

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I am pretty sure I tried wheat sprouts last winter and was less than pleased with the results. Although fresh greens may become very welcome when living off stored foods in the winter.

I also routinely sprout wheat for fodder for my rabbits in winter and for malting as the beginning process of making malt syrup.

Even if I don't care for your ideas they are all good ideas and I appreciate them. Keep them coming.
Sprouts of almost any have way more nutrition than the original seed. There are places in Utah where you can order a 6 gallon bucket of misc seeds. 15 year ago I got a bucket and gave two away. We are almost finished with ours. Every year or so, I would pour them into another bucket and back to aerate them as the company said. I may sound like a whiz in all this but for many years I was in the Mormon Church and went to lots of meetings, mostly women, on sprouting, herbology, and general food storage.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sprouts of almost any have way more nutrition than the original seed. There are places in Utah where you can order a 6 gallon bucket of misc seeds. 15 year ago I got a bucket and gave two away. We are almost finished with ours. Every year or so, I would pour them into another bucket and back to aerate them as the company said. I may sound like a whiz in all this but for many years I was in the Mormon Church and went to lots of meetings, mostly women, on sprouting, herbology, and general food storage.
I am a fan of sprouts just not wheat, rye or barley sprouts. I like corn sprouts but from what I have read they my have some toxins in them and I think bean sprouts could be a very good addition to a stored food diet. A few years ago I bought a pound of alfalfa sprout seeds. In a very short amount I time we used up all but a few ounces of them.
 

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Buy an electric impact grinder and you can make six cups of ultra fine flour in about 5 minutes.
Then capture some sour dough yeast and enjoy some of the best tasting bread in the world.
 

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Fella on another board, probably AR15.com would put them in a thermos with hot water overnight. Then eat porridge in the morning.
 

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I think I will check my local library to see if it has any of Esther Dlckey's books. My interest is piqued but I don't want to buy any more books.

I had a friend that used buckwheat groats as a meat substitute in some recipes but buckwheat is not really a grain.
 

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If your family didn’t like the whole wheat bread, you ought to try hard white wheat- it’s closer to commercial wheat bread. Of soft white wheat for biscuits.

Doesn’t answer you question, but I wanted to point it out. I use a lot of quinoa for stored grain, not cheap, but I love the flavor, and it is normally eaten whole.
 

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About once a month a grind up pre-GMO wheat, spelt, kamut (ancient wheat), rye, quinoa, millet, buckwheat,barley, oat groats. Gives me about 1.5 gallons. I can add dried apples, craisins, and canned plums, to some flour, adding powdered milk:taped::taped: and yogurt, as I did yesterday, and make a good porridge. I often make waffles, or pancakes on a grill, but when I make these, I add ground up flax, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, coconut, sesame seeds. I also add chia seeds, wheat germ, and wheat bran, plug powdered milk and powdered or fresh eggs. Can add cheese poder to

Also with the flour you can have dumplings and beans and dumplings with fruit. To the bean dumplings, add cheese powder and add honey to the fruit dumplings. You can feed a lot of people with either mix and people will love you for it.

With a 2-quart pressure cooker and a cop of wheat in several cups of water, you can have cooked wheat berries pretty fast. With this you can add to meat to extend the meal. Or you can use vegetable plus the cooked berries plus a lot of garlic and beef bouillon. Is gear in making chili beans--lots of spices and cheese powder.

Esther ****ey's book, "Passport to Survival" was like a Mormon cooking bible in the early 70's. It can be found on E-bay or Amazon.
 

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grow...

wheat berries grow so easily. Eat the grass for nutrition. My family is gluten-sensitive, so having invested so much in berries before knowing this, I'm glad to have found a solution.
 
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