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Resident misanthrope
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
rather than hijacking the recovering large equipment tread I am starting a new one.

So, what can one bring as a part of all the equipment that one owns and know would be of help in a permanent(no going back eotwawki) bug out?

Unless your bug out vehicle is a M46 you would have to prioritize.

I have tool's that I know I will not be able to bring with me but I am working on assembling/making/modifying a tool kit that I can bring with me.

This includes:

Mini lathe with additional 24V motor(have the lathe not the 24Vmotor)
A small milling machine with 12 and 24 volt spindle with everything needed to run it as a cnc machine.(have most of the parts)

A disassemblable cnc router (not ferrous capable)
A small cnc lathe.

Welding equipment(stick and carbon arc brazing capable)
12-14 volt battery tools with an insert so that they can be run as a corded tool directly of a car battery.

2 complete socket wrench etc. sets with lots of spare tools

Miscellaneous tools too numerous to mention here but suffice to say that everything I will have with me when I bug out is (1)man portable and will fit in a pickup and small (terrain capable) trailer.

All this does assume that I will have several hours to pack before I leave and I do have a contingency that involves leaving with what is already in my pick-up with no time to pack.

As I am well aware of "the best laid plans" and all and since I also really like to learn news things, books are an integral part of my preps and I would recommend everyone to think along the same lines even if it just means bringing books that teaches how to do/make/repair thing to be read later.

http://www.lindsaybks.com/

and

http://www.camdenmin.co.uk/

are two sources for books that I would recommend.

The books on building a metalshop from scratch(Gingery) would be a very good place to start.

There are ofcourse many other things that I will bring as well including weapons ranging from every firearm I have to spears and bows, nuts and bolts+ threaded rod in many sizes, electronics(radios, lap-tops, multimeters etc.)

As I am no where near filling a trailer + a pick-up with what I have already mentioned I welcome any suggestions about things and equipment that I haven't thought of.

Whenever you see footage on the news of people evacuating due to war or natural disasters, the one thing that always strikes me is the tendency of people to evacuate with EVERYTHING they have/can bring.

I do suspect that most here would(when confronted with the reality of really having to leave and the prospect of probably not coming back) trow part of their plans out the window and try to bring more than was included in their plans if they had the time to do so.

I would be very interested in seeing a separate forum here dedicated to what each individual is bringing/planing(one tread per user) and I would post a list that I would update as it grows/evolves(with pictures).

In addition to serving as an inspiration it would serve the purpose of allowing people to find holes and weaknesses in their plans by seeing what other people are doing and hearing about their experiences and problems with their prep's.
 

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Resident misanthrope
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159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That sound's kind of lazy(no offense). What if a eotwawki event happens in your neck of the woods and the one pace on the planet that you would want to get away from is where you live???

If you have mobility you have options, all your options are premised upon your location being safe...What if it isn't?
 

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Premium Member
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To me, that stuff should all be in place at the bug out location, unless it's small enough to pack in the BOV quickly. And unimportant enough that if you can't use the BOV and only have what you can carry in the BOB, it won't effect your chances of survival.
 

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Left the building
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That sound's kind of lazy(no offense). What if a eotwawki event happens in your neck of the woods and the one pace on the planet that you would want to get away from is where you live???

If you have mobility you have options, all your options are premised upon your location being safe...What if it isn't?
Have you considered that not everyone on the forum has the ability, or the financial resources to have an alternate BOL? There are many on this forum with disabilties, and loved ones with health issues that can't be moved. Mobility for some is an issue. A lot of people care for elderly parents and loved ones. They have no choice except to bug in where they are. Lazy, huh?
 

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Registered
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I will be bugging in come what may. I already live remote, off the grid, and have a lot of food put away and raised bed gardens ready and more getting ready all the time. I have plans to build a chicken yard and coop come spring and several other small projects also finishing up my rear roof water collection system. Just hope there is more time to double my solar system and wind systems... As far as defense , if they could even find me , having been in the service in the mid 60's, I will make it very hard and dangerous to come past my first fence let alone my compound fence.
 

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Limpin to safety.
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7,637 Posts
I have an assortment of shovels that I really want to bring along, but they weight a lot.

To be honest I probably have 20 pounds worth of dead weight I need to get rid of.
 
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Live Secret, Live Happy
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17,554 Posts
If you leave 30 days before the crisis, you can take all your stuff and sell your house.
If you leave 30 hours before, you can take at least one full pickup load.
If you leave 30 minutes before or after the crisis, you can drive away with what you can grab and go.
If you wait until the Drudge Report carries the news, you may have to walk.
 

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Resident misanthrope
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159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I do not have the resources needed to have a secondary BOL, I do have someone that is starting to have mobility impairing health issues and I will be taking them with me.

Part of my bug out includes(I should have mentioned this) the materials needed to make one of several styles of house shaped "tents" with one end of the spectrum being the type that sot of looks like a house and the other end of the spectrum being ger or tipi like.

This structure consists of tarpaulin, square alu pipe and plywood connectors with the necessary bolts/nuts etc. as well as plywood sheets for flooring as well as steel tubes, connectors and plywood to make one or more raised beds to accommodate those that due to health issues might have a problem sleeping or getting up of the ground.

When I get around to it I will make a plog with pictures and instructions/meassurements etc.

What can be achieved as far as bugging out is concerned with a pick-up, an old trailer, some ingenuity, simple tools and low cost(or in some cases free) materials does make permanently bugging out to an as of yet undetermined location doable.

I don't have much money but I have internet access, a library near by, the ability to learn and I am healthy enough to make things that would otherwise be financially out of reach.

You learn as long as you live and you live as long as you learn.

Adding new skill sets to your repertoire is not only something that improves ones chances as well as ones ability to assist others but it is actually a fun and rewarding process.

As far as disabilities severe enough to make it impossible to facilitate bugging out with those one cares about(100% infirm, dependent on oxygen/dialysis/respirator etc.....), anyone that loves you would want you to live and no matter how much it would tear me up inside to leave them behind, this level of disability would in a situation bad enough to necessitate bugging out be a matter of postponing the inevitable and more a case of extending suffering rather than life.

For me it would be a much better thing to let them get started on their next life rather than extending their suffering in this one(not to far ago I lost someone close to me and the circumstances surrounding this did (eventually) teach me to let go rather than selfishly holding on to someone and extending their suffering because of an inability to deal with the reality of a loved one being done with this life).


There is no such thing as an unsolvable problem, only an inability to do what it takes to solve it.


Have you considered that not everyone on the forum has the ability, or the financial resources to have an alternate BOL? There are many on this forum with disabilties, and loved ones with health issues that can't be moved. Mobility for some is an issue. A lot of people care for elderly parents and loved ones. They have no choice except to bug in where they are. Lazy, huh?
 

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Resident misanthrope
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159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
To me survival isn't about hanging on to life but rather about living after something all-encompassingly bad happens, surviving to face "what next" is a part of it but to me it is only the beginning.

Very few people have what it takes to just survive(basically just treading water to keep their head above the surface for their entire life).

What is the point of surviving if it is all you will be doing for what would probably be a long life.

To me, that stuff should all be in place at the bug out location, unless it's small enough to pack in the BOV quickly. And unimportant enough that if you can't use the BOV and only have what you can carry in the BOB, it won't effect your chances of survival.
 

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What would Mal do
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I too made the move 7 years ago to the one place I'd like to be come eotw.
But for purposes of your thread...if I had to leave i have planned for that as well.

I'm not an accomplished mechanic, woodworker, metalist, electronical wiz, etc.
I can do ok on vehicals and makeshift stuff to serve duty so I have a small toolbox with the basics..wrenches in all sizes...metric and US...tire repair kits..all the typical road hazard stuff..glues n duct tape.

My bug out plan is not so much a location..we don't have a cave in the mountains to run to...but we do own a travel trailer..so wherever we have to go to..we'll have our home with us..that gives me a lot of resource for the basics right off the bat..tool box in the bed of the truck, small portable genny, spare gas cans..the list is long but I think it starts to move away from your OP of tools.. I'll have enough tools with me to stand a fighting chance to keep the truck running (spare fan belt, hoses, etc)tools to keep the pedal bike and honda trail bike running and maintenance to the camper.
Course once on the road..the odds start to stack up against you...bad traffic..over heated cars, wrecks, looters attacking your rig , major breakdown that you simply can't carry repairs for...sure I can carry spare wheel bearings but what if you get in a wreck and the sudden impact bends/jackknifes the trailer hitch?...so many random possibilities...I figure I'll try to prep for the basics and hope for a little luck..course if my little world has ended.. I don't imagine I'll be feeling too lucky anyway.
 

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Left the building
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I do not have the resources needed to have a secondary BOL, I do have someone that is starting to have mobility impairing health issues and I will be taking them with me.

Part of my bug out includes(I should have mentioned this) the materials needed to make one of several styles of house shaped "tents" with one end of the spectrum being the type that sot of looks like a house and the other end of the spectrum being ger or tipi like.

This structure consists of tarpaulin, square alu pipe and plywood connectors with the necessary bolts/nuts etc. as well as plywood sheets for flooring as well as steel tubes, connectors and plywood to make one or more raised beds to accommodate those that due to health issues might have a problem sleeping or getting up of the ground.

When I get around to it I will make a plog with pictures and instructions/meassurements etc.

What can be achieved as far as bugging out is concerned with a pick-up, an old trailer, some ingenuity, simple tools and low cost(or in some cases free) materials does make permanently bugging out to an as of yet undetermined location doable.

I don't have much money but I have internet access, a library near by, the ability to learn and I am healthy enough to make things that would otherwise be financially out of reach.

You learn as long as you live and you live as long as you learn.

Adding new skill sets to your repertoire is not only something that improves ones chances as well as ones ability to assist others but it is actually a fun and rewarding process.

As far as disabilities severe enough to make it impossible to facilitate bugging out with those one cares about(100% infirm, dependent on oxygen/dialysis/respirator etc.....), anyone that loves you would want you to live and no matter how much it would tear me up inside to leave them behind, this level of disability would in a situation bad enough to necessitate bugging out be a matter of postponing the inevitable and more a case of extending suffering rather than life.

For me it would be a much better thing to let them get started on their next life rather than extending their suffering in this one(not to far ago I lost someone close to me and the circumstances surrounding this did (eventually) teach me to let go rather than selfishly holding on to someone and extending their suffering because of an inability to deal with the reality of a loved one being done with this life).


There is no such thing as an unsolvable problem, only an inability to do what it takes to solve it.

Some people value human life. Some people don't. Thanks for expressing your view. Welcome to survivalist boards....where everyone should survive...Oh, except sickly, ill, incapacitated or disabled and elderly. You could author a new healthcare bill for SHTF. Survival of the fittest..(you)...and to hell with those that can't keep up with the rest because they can't bug out. Nice write up.

I would be very interested in seeing a separate forum here dedicated to what each individual is bringing/planing(one tread per user) and I would post a list that I would update as it grows/evolves(with pictures).
Let us know how that works out for ya....



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Those that care for others get's cared for by others. Those that don't, get's taken care of.

In my opinion someone that prey's on others or don't mind taking care of their own well-being at the expense of others should be taken out of the equation.
 

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Resident misanthrope
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159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think that doing OK with may different things is infinitely better than being an expert at only one.

While acquiring new skills something that in and of it self as a worth wile undertaking one does stumble upon stuff that one really enjoys doing and might even become really good at.

While there is always things that one never thought of prepping for it does sound like you are well on your way to having what's needed to continue living after surviving .

Man is a tool maker/user and everything is a tool be it for transport, manufacture, living or anything else that one might do with more than one's naked self:upsidedown:

As far as "major repair" is concerned.... it is amazing what can be done with enough log's and thick allthread/nuts + chains/steel wire and a few 5-10-15-20ton hydraulic jacks.

With time, patience, planing and thinking things through one can right vehicles, lift heavy truck frames, change engines and trannys and much more.

A heavy car jack might not lift higher than 5-10" but with some wooden railway sleepers and such you can ad support and 5-10" does add up even if it takes a day to get there.

There are ancient stone structures etc. all around the world that weighs quite a few tonnes and they where all built with nothing more than log's and wooden cranes, pulleys and rope made from weak(compared to chain/steel wire or nylon rope) plant fibers.

Peoples little worlds end all the time all over the planet every day, many pick them selves up, dust them selves off, realize that they are still here and there is still time to make a new little world, more people to help and more people to care about.

There are no endings, only new beginnings.......................
I'm starting to sound like a fortune cookie here but you know what I mean:thumb::thumb::thumb:

I too made the move 7 years ago to the one place I'd like to be come eotw.
But for purposes of your thread...if I had to leave i have planned for that as well.

I'm not an accomplished mechanic, woodworker, metalist, electronical wiz, etc.
I can do ok on vehicals and makeshift stuff to serve duty so I have a small toolbox with the basics..wrenches in all sizes...metric and US...tire repair kits..all the typical road hazard stuff..glues n duct tape.

My bug out plan is not so much a location..we don't have a cave in the mountains to run to...but we do own a travel trailer..so wherever we have to go to..we'll have our home with us..that gives me a lot of resource for the basics right off the bat..tool box in the bed of the truck, small portable genny, spare gas cans..the list is long but I think it starts to move away from your OP of tools.. I'll have enough tools with me to stand a fighting chance to keep the truck running (spare fan belt, hoses, etc)tools to keep the pedal bike and honda trail bike running and maintenance to the camper.
Course once on the road..the odds start to stack up against you...bad traffic..over heated cars, wrecks, looters attacking your rig , major breakdown that you simply can't carry repairs for...sure I can carry spare wheel bearings but what if you get in a wreck and the sudden impact bends/jackknifes the trailer hitch?...so many random possibilities...I figure I'll try to prep for the basics and hope for a little luck..course if my little world has ended.. I don't imagine I'll be feeling too lucky anyway.
 

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Resident misanthrope
Joined
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159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Most of the stuff that I would bring that didn't already have a permanent place in my pick-up or was among the smaller stuff that was in daily use is(will be) permanently packed up and stored in the basement covered in grease etc and periodically checked for condition.

5-10 hours would make for a very lazy packing operation and I would probably be ready to go in 3 to 4 hours.

Bear in mind that I would have planned in advance what goes where and in what order so the packing would(hopefully) go fairly smoothly.

If you leave 30 days before the crisis, you can take all your stuff and sell your house.
If you leave 30 hours before, you can take at least one full pickup load.
If you leave 30 minutes before or after the crisis, you can drive away with what you can grab and go.
If you wait until the Drudge Report carries the news, you may have to walk.
 

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Resident misanthrope
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159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Agree, but what I was envisioning was something along whats in the picture but
with a large truck like an F350 or even bigger.



An uneven ground can be compensated for with bolting sleepers together to keep them from shifting and bolting the vehicle to the sleepers and of course using rather a lot more sleepers than in the picture

Chain-hoists are also a very useful tool for large jobs in the middle of no-were/ under less than ideal conditions.

Old or used jack's, chain-hoists etc can be had for next to nothing and such stores as harbor freight carry new (made in china) that are very cheap.

Sleepers/log's are of course sourced locally.

http://www.hi-lift.com/index.html

Anyone with a trailer, pickup or SUV should have one of these.
 

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Left the building
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Agree, but what I was envisioning was something along whats in the picture but
with a large truck like an F350 or even bigger.



An uneven ground can be compensated for with bolting sleepers together to keep them from shifting and bolting the vehicle to the sleepers and of course using rather a lot more sleepers than in the picture

Chain-hoists are also a very useful tool for large jobs in the middle of no-were/ under less than ideal conditions.

Old or used jack's, chain-hoists etc can be had for next to nothing and such stores as harbor freight carry new (made in china) that are very cheap.

Sleepers/log's are of course sourced locally.
These go with a jack.....Why would anybody lug the extra weight of ties?
 
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