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It's just the wife and me now. With things progressively going down hill I've been thinking more and more about an outside dog.
I know everyone has thier favorites. I want a big, strong , smart dog. One that is able to take a man down without trouble.

It will be an outside dog . We have five acres and one house.

I have heard that it is sometimes prudent to train the dog to respond in another language.

Any and all help will be appreciated.

Big Eye
 

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I can't recommend Airedales highly enough. One of the best of the war dogs, it will protect you and your family, and usually, any unattended children it finds. Needs some attention to stay healthy, especially if there is just one, but they are outside dogs, unless spoiled when a pup.
 

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I favor the American Bulldog. They are great watchdogs, loyal to a fault and great with kids. Go to your local animal shelter and try to find one a couple of years old, young ones love to chew on anything!
 

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Rottweilers are also very good with children and very territorial to the household. Like all working dog breeds they need lots of exercise however. Mine is walked for about 40 mins a day and has many tug o war sessions haha. You can see my beast in my profile pictures.
 

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All the above but add german shepard, akita, and english masiff. All the above breeds do need proper training. The bigest mistake ppl make is the dont properly socalize their dog or train it, so now you have a agressive out of conrol dog. when they are small it doesnt matter. bu when you have a large breed dog things can go bad quickly
 

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Dog are like guns in that everyone has their favorite. Most dogs with a level of intelligence will be a good watch dog. You don't want an attack dog since they will turn on family members. If a dog is attached to you they will defend to the death. I have a golden retriever mix. She is 3/4 golden and 1/4 australian shepherd. She was a rescue dog. I have raised dogs and animals since I was a kid. Mine took on a snake a month back to protect a baby in the park by my house. the mom thought she was attacking the child till she saw the water mocasin in her mouth. Fortunately she got by unbitten.

Bottom line is find the dog that fits you and your lifestyle. I like medium to large dogs. Mine is only about 65 pounds. Also be sure you can take time with them. they need attention. Also prepare for taking care of them in emergency situations. theywill need food too.
 

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I’ve had two German Shepherd dogs and can highly recommend the breed. They are very smart, responsive to training, family oriented and very loyal.

But with any dog you have to realize that they are pack animals and keeping any dog outside for a long time without interaction is a bad idea.

Lack of socialization with people and other dogs will make a large dog dangerous to both and a potential liability for you. I got both of my GSD’s as adult dogs. They were socialized with with people but not with other dogs. They saw other dogs and other animals as prey. I was unable to train this tendency out of them.

Protective breeds don’t need special training other than obedience training.

Each breed has its special qualities so reading as much as you can about the breed before hand will narrow down your search and help you find the right fit for you.
 

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I'm happy for those going for a German Sheperd. These are fine dogs. It might not pack the thick stocky muscles of a rottweiler or have the incredible composure of a mastiff sitting up curiously.. But IMO they excel in scoring the highest on all criteria; size, speed, loyalty, bite power, alertness, smell, hearing, aggression, ability to learn fast and so on. It provides the best mix. I saw a lot of german sheperd vs german sheperd growing up, as there were 14 adults on 6 acres and a lot of pups. There was an outdoor big cage kennel which they retreated to to sleep but otherwise they were 100% outdoor. They settle disputes rather violently and are generally hyper and loud dogs, but everyone passing the establishment you live in notices that too (ever walked by a fence when a german sheperd banged up against it?) They like to bark at livestock. It was hilarious I remember a neighbours foul horse would run up and down the fence playing, whilst clearly the german sheperd was following it up down with dinner in mind (but they never jumped and attacked, were just defending the territory). One day I will own my "own", but it's not the time yet.
 

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One thing to remember- *especially* with breeds such as Rottweilers, Dobermans etc. is to be SURE to get your dog from a GOOD breeder. Dogs who aren't well bred can have aggression issues. Protective is good... Aggressive is a liability. If you have or might have grandchildren in the future- keep this in mind- but also just out of common sense...

And remember- a dog is an addition to the family- they are naturally pack animals and will be FAR more loyal and protective of you if treated as such- and not just a yard ornament. :thumb:
 

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Depends on what you want the dog to do. Do you just want a set of teeth out in the yard? Or do you want the dog for his senses as an extension of your own? Some of the smaller hunting breeds can extend your senses and live well indoors, without having to store hundreds of pounds of dogfood.

What do you really want from the dog? Remember big toothed breeds can usually be bought off with mcdonalds hamburgers to bypass them. They are also easily poisoned or killed. Smaller breeds are inside where they do their jobs and are not exposed to outside threats.
 

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Depends on what you want the dog to do. Do you just want a set of teeth out in the yard? Or do you want the dog for his senses as an extension of your own? Some of the smaller hunting breeds can extend your senses and live well indoors, without having to store hundreds of pounds of dogfood.

What do you really want from the dog?
It's in the title; a watch dog, and in the content; one that can take a man down. A small dog does not cut that criteria. Just try throwing a hotdog at a surprised German Sheperd on it's own territory mate :D:
 

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Depends on what you want the dog to do. Do you just want a set of teeth out in the yard? Or do you want the dog for his senses as an extension of your own? Some of the smaller hunting breeds can extend your senses and live well indoors, without having to store hundreds of pounds of dogfood.

What do you really want from the dog? Remember big toothed breeds can usually be bought off with mcdonalds hamburgers to bypass them. They are also easily poisoned or killed. Smaller breeds are inside where they do their jobs and are not exposed to outside threats.
(Or bigger breeds which are better suited to the indoors like a Great Dane :upsidedown: )

And- if the dog is well fed and taught to not accept food from "strangers"- then the McDonalds hamburger isn't so much of a concern :)

Just wanted to add too- that with the "extra set of teeth in the yard" if that is all a dog is to their owner- that owner should not be surprised when those teeth are also turned on *them*...
 

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It's in the title; a watch dog, and in the content; one that can take a man down. A small dog does not cut that criteria. Just try throwing a hotdog at a surprised German Sheperd on it's own territory mate :D:
*Chuckle* Yeah- the hot dog will be inhaled in .02 seconds and then the dog will be looking to eat whomever threw it who wasn't supposed to be there LOL
 
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