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We all have BOB's or GHB's but what are you using for a survival bag in your vehicle? In addition to a standard bug out or get home bag I also keep a bag with supplies in it in my vehicle. It is dedicated to survival out of the vehicle but also as a take away bag if I need to cross load to a different vehicle. In it I keep items such as ETool, larger tarps, water filtration, additional clothing, food, fire kit, medical, wool blankets etc etc.... Currently using a North American Rescue CasEvac bag. Whats your plan?
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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

View attachment 457706

One for each vehicle. Just a GHB. Not too much stuff.
I have a couple of those made by condor but just not big enough for what I need in it...
 

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GHB is a Velocity Systems Summit. It is in whatever vehicle I am using at that time - at work, it's in my work car; on my own time, it's in my truck:
  • Gaiters
  • Boonie cover
  • Shemagh
  • Insulated leather work gloves
  • Spare 18650, 18350, cr1632, 2032, AA, AAA batteries
  • Power packs x2
  • Charging cables
  • 3x spare AR mags
  • 4x spare pistol mags
  • Folding solar panel
  • Merino baselayer (top and bottom)
  • 2x pairs merino socks
  • Rain suit
  • Exped DownMat
  • Hill People Gear Mountain Serapa
  • Merino watch cap
  • 1x First Strike Ration
  • 1x bag of trail mix
  • Fire kit - in a Pelican 1010 case- mini bic, vial of magnesium shavings, Swedish firesteel and striker, fresnel lens, 2 Wet Fire tabs, cotton balls soaked in vaseline, strike anywhere matches
  • MSR Guardian water purifier
  • Dirty and Clean water bags
  • 3l Source water bladder
  • Stainless steel Nalgene 32oz, with cooking cup
  • First Aid kit (not an IFAK) - bandaids, gauze, burn bandages, neosporin, kerlix, ACE bandage, SAM splint, moleskin, tweezers, nail clippers, eye drops, pepto pills, cough suppressant, Cepacol lozenges, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, medical tape, shears...I may be missing a couple things, this is from memory
  • Mora Garberg knife
  • Compass
  • Petzl Tactikka headlamp
  • Small tool kit - folding saw (wood and metal blades), universal socket/ratchet, multi-bit screwdriver, concertina cutter, allen/torx keys, control cabinet keys, needlenose pliers
  • Toiletry kit - soap, camp towel, toothbrush/paste, floss sticks, toilet paper
  • Litefighter 1-person tent
  • Duct tape
  • Paracord

Most likely walk for me would be from work to home - approximately 50 miles through a mix of major urban area, flat farmland, flat woodlands, and hilly woodlands.

Have various tools in the toolbox in the bed of my trunk. Shovel, bolt cutters, crowbar, sledgehammer, tow straps, empty sand bags, two hi-lift jacks, some other stuff.

Truck Vault under rear seat for weapons/armor/electronics/ammo/chest rig/battle belt.

Big med bag in the truck is a Tactical Medical Solutions R-AID bag, plussed up with some additional stuff.

Tear-away IFAK on the back of both head rests

Fanny pack/IFAK+ in the center console

Case of water and Mountain House meals in the rear of the cab, along with a couple surplus wool blankets. Always have a spare pair of broken-in boots in my truck, along with a small duffel with a couple sets of clothing - seasonal sets, gray man/tactical.
 

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GHB is a Velocity Systems Summit. It is in whatever vehicle I am using at that time - at work, it's in my work car; on my own time, it's in my truck:
  • Gaiters
  • Boonie cover
  • Shemagh
  • Insulated leather work gloves
  • Spare 18650, 18350, cr1632, 2032, AA, AAA batteries
  • Power packs x2
  • Charging cables
  • 3x spare AR mags
  • 4x spare pistol mags
  • Folding solar panel
  • Merino baselayer (top and bottom)
  • 2x pairs merino socks
  • Rain suit
  • Exped DownMat
  • Hill People Gear Mountain Serapa
  • Merino watch cap
  • 1x First Strike Ration
  • 1x bag of trail mix
  • Fire kit - in a Pelican 1010 case- mini bic, vial of magnesium shavings, Swedish firesteel and striker, fresnel lens, 2 Wet Fire tabs, cotton balls soaked in vaseline, strike anywhere matches
  • MSR Guardian water purifier
  • Dirty and Clean water bags
  • 3l Source water bladder
  • Stainless steel Nalgene 32oz, with cooking cup
  • First Aid kit (not an IFAK) - bandaids, gauze, burn bandages, neosporin, kerlix, ACE bandage, SAM splint, moleskin, tweezers, nail clippers, eye drops, pepto pills, cough suppressant, Cepacol lozenges, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, medical tape, shears...I may be missing a couple things, this is from memory
  • Mora Garberg knife
  • Compass
  • Petzl Tactikka headlamp
  • Small tool kit - folding saw (wood and metal blades), universal socket/ratchet, multi-bit screwdriver, concertina cutter, allen/torx keys, control cabinet keys, needlenose pliers
  • Toiletry kit - soap, camp towel, toothbrush/paste, floss sticks, toilet paper
  • Litefighter 1-person tent
  • Duct tape
  • Paracord

Most likely walk for me would be from work to home - approximately 50 miles through a mix of major urban area, flat farmland, flat woodlands, and hilly woodlands.

Have various tools in the toolbox in the bed of my trunk. Shovel, bolt cutters, crowbar, sledgehammer, tow straps, empty sand bags, two hi-lift jacks, some other stuff.

Truck Vault under rear seat for weapons/armor/electronics/ammo/chest rig/battle belt.

Big med bag in the truck is a Tactical Medical Solutions R-AID bag, plussed up with some additional stuff.

Tear-away IFAK on the back of both head rests

Fanny pack/IFAK+ in the center console

Case of water and Mountain House meals in the rear of the cab, along with a couple surplus wool blankets. Always have a spare pair of broken-in boots in my truck, along with a small duffel with a couple sets of clothing - seasonal sets, gray man/tactical.
How much of that gets left behind if you have to abandon your vehicle? Or are the trying to take it all home?
 

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If my vehicle gets abandoned, it honestly depends on the circumstances. This was discussed in another thread, but my personal thoughts are if I am being forced to abandon my vehicle, things are beyond bad. If they weren't, I"'d be calling a wrecker, or calling my wife or a friend for a ride, or hunkering down wherever I happened to be.

Assuming a SHTF that was so bad I felt going it on foot was my only option, the GHB goes on, as does the fanny/IFAK+. I always have a handgun/spare mag on me, so that goes too. In a case like this, more than likely, all the stuff in the truck vault is getting deployed, too. If things are such that vehicle travel is unsafe (drawing too much attention) or impossible (uh...EMP? Not much else is realistic in my area, and I'm 99.999% sure even EMP isn't stopping my truck), things are bad enough for me to have a rifle in-hand.

Everything else is there to keep the truck running, clear a path for the truck, or allow me to ride out whatever issue is going on, in the truck.
 

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From another thread:

Running a Velocity Systems Summit 30l as a GHB. I have the helmet carrier available, and also have the reversible pack cover in Multicam/Multicam Alpine. The pack is coyote brown. I think it's important to get some definitions clear. For me, my GHB is actually heavier/more in-depth than a BOB.

A BOB is something I can grab in a localized short-term (72 hours or so) event, like a fire or tornado strike. It has a couple changes of clothes, important documents, toiletries, cash and debit/credit cards - because the event I perceive using it for is likely to lead to a short hotel stay.

A GHB is exactly what it sounds like - a bag to get me home. My most likely distance is from work to home, which is approximately 50 miles. If it is a situation where life is going on as normal in the world, and cars are still running/roads are still open, I would not need the bag. I would call my wife, bum a ride from a friend, crash at work, or crash on a buddy's couch. The very need to use a GHB implies a fairly major event, in my mind.

Like I said, most likely distance is 50 miles. Terrain I would need to traverse is about 30% major metropolitan urban, and 70% woodlands, with the final approximately 10 miles being hilly woods. Weather in my AO varies from high 90's with brutal humidity, to low teens, with a few outliers outside that norm.

I'm not making that trek in a day. In a world where everything goes perfectly, I might make it in two, but I would be physically wrecked when I got home. Based on the assumption that any event that would necessitate use of the GHB would be major, being nearly non-functional upon arrival is not an option. I plan for 3-5 days, but it could be more.

I have maintained excellent physical condition, but time waits on no man. I don't heal or recover like I did when I was 30. I run, lift, do HIIT, and ruck weekly. My training ruck is twice the weight of my GHB. I do my part to be able to perform, but Murphy gets a vote.

As I have aged, there are some things I am no longer willing to put up with, if given a choice. I hate being cold AND wet. One or the other, but not both. And, I hate crappy sleep. My time in the Infantry gave me the ability to fall asleep anywhere. My aging body has decided that sleeping on cold, hard, pokey ground is not going to get any cooperation from my body when I wake up. Can I be cold and wet, and can I sleep in crappy conditions, and survive? Sure, but in the immortal words of Roger Murtaugh, "I'm getting too old for that ish." So, I'll gladly pack a couple of extra pounds if it will keep either of those things from happening.

Finally, urban survival and wderness survival are two different beasts. Our needs remain the same (food, water, shelter, fire), but the means of acquiring, and the tools needed to acquire them are different. Because of my personal circumstances, I need to be able to do both. Which means my pack is heavier than if I was only prepping for one.

My GHB has a first aid kit which focuses on keeping me mobile, and quiet. Pepto pills (anti-diarrheal, heartburn, upset stomach), NSAIDs, anti-fungal cream, wound treatment (bandaids, blister bandages, moleskin, neosporin, gauze, kerlix, burn bandages), SAM splint, throat lozenges, cough suppressants, foot powder, toenail clippers, and tweezers.

Tool kit (pliers, multi-bit screwdriver, folding saw with blades for wood and metal, control cabinet keys, mini prybar, lock picks, mini visegrips, concertina cutter, allen keys, universal socket, duct tape, 550 cord) - designed around getting me into/out of places, foraging materials/parts, and accessing water/gas/electricity in an urban environment. Could easily dump the majority of it once I hit the woods. Morakniv Garberg.

Fire kit in a Pelican 1010 case - fresnel lens, mini bic, strike anywhere matches, fire steel, two wetfire tabs, 5 vaseline-soaked cotton balls, magnesium shavings in a small vial, and a pocket fire bellow. I have never not been able to start a fire with that kit, regardless of conditions.

Spare socks, rain suit, shelter, Exped Downmat, Hill People Gear Mountain Serapa, spare tshirts, gaiters, shemagh, merino watch cap, insulated leather work gloves, merino baselayer kit. Throw on all the merino, the gloves, use the shemagh as a scarf, wrap up in the Serapa, and bed down on the Downmat, and I can stay comfy and warm in anything but the worst of our winter weather.

Compass, map, headlamp, spare batteries, 26800 mah rechargeable battery pack, and folding solar panel

Source hydration bladder, 32 oz steel Nalgene with cup, MSR Guardian water purifier, dirty water bag, for grab and go gathering, a First Strike Ration and a bag of trailmix.

Small personal hygiene kit - toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, camp towel, razor, floss, toilet paper, wet wipes.

Multiple routes plotted, and entered into ATAK/marked on map. Potential layup sites marked (police/fire stations, schools,known abandoned businesses).

Personal defense can be decided last-minute. I work fulltime as an instructor at a large police agency. I literally have my pick of whatever is in our armory or EOD bunker (depending on just how bad things are), and a few million rounds of ammo. I have a lot of toys in my trunk, including plate carriers, chest rigs, helmet, nvg's, and my personal rifle and shotgun.

Including water, the pack weighs in at just over 30#, not including anything from the personal defense column. Each person's AO, and the needed distance to travel will dictate what they need for their GHB.
 

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We all have BOB's or GHB's but what are you using for a survival bag in your vehicle? In addition to a standard bug out or get home bag I also keep a bag with supplies in it in my vehicle. It is dedicated to survival out of the vehicle but also as a take away bag if I need to cross load to a different vehicle. In it I keep items such as ETool, larger tarps, water filtration, additional clothing, food, fire kit, medical, wool blankets etc etc.... Currently using a North American Rescue CasEvac bag. Whats your plan?
View attachment 457678

View attachment 457675

View attachment 457677
I like that bag. I presume its discontinued?
 

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Comm Monkey
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I've got a Heilkon-tek bail out bag for just around town, that has enough gear to get me home. I also have a canvas tool bag under the floorboards in the trunk area that has just about everything I need to camp out for a few days. If I've got a water source I can filter I should be good for about a week after that I could survive but comfort is far from guaranteed.
 

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I had a tactical type diaper bag in my car before it broke beyond my desire to repair it. The truck, I keep the stuff loose because it really doesn't have any extra space in the cab (I mean really, lol). I try to shove an emergency sleeping bag and the FAK and some other stuff under the seats. If it's anywhere near the carseats the kids will tear into it.
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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Over time the supplies in our vehicles have grown in size and amount and number.

I used to use two small gatemouth bags, but switched to a larger gatemouth plus a relatively cheap backpack, supplemented by a small string backpack.

I have no illusions about being able to hike 20 miles to civilization; the kits are designed to help maintain ourselves for 1-3 days. The backpacks are there (regular and string) if we need to hike out to...somewhere. But I don't expect that necessarily.

I started putting kits in the vehicles years ago when I read about motorists being stranded on an interstate overnight. Can't recall what shut it down, but there were many cars unable to proceed. I asked myself what I'd want to have access to under such situations, and the "car kits" were born.

If you want to see what's in them, look here:


Note: everyone's kits are going to be necessarily different. If I lived in the desert southwest, for instance, I'd have more water. I live in the upper midwest so protection against the cold is central. I added a Sawyer water filter to the kits, and a little more "food" in the form of lifeboat rations.
 

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Well I'm a special case since my semi is my home away from home. I do have kit to grab and go should I have to abandon my truck.

I have approximately 3 months of food in the truck. Divided between the fridge, my mini chest freezer and dry goods/non perishables. I recently added a 50 gallon water tank that's slung under the trailer in addition to several gallons I keep in the cab.

Clothing for all weather.

Tools for darn near any contingency short of an engine over haul.

I have twin 150 gallon diesel tanks I top off daily. Full I have a range of 1800-2400 mile range depending on how heavy I'm hauling. If I wanted to drop and bobtail I'm guessing that range would nearly double. I've gotten as high as 15, yes 15mpgs bobtailing.

You name it I've probably got it in my truck.

Weaponry I choose not to discuss.
 

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JAG,

I am governed by situation-specific particulars.

These variables are eg season, planned route to GOOD, anticipated population I will be comingled with and road conditions.

I would avoid carrying my usual decent quality maritime bags/kits around the metro DC swamp. These bags/kits are waterproof, float and comply with high standard of SOLAS - better than USCG.
 
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