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Indefatigable
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Sandman Slim by Richard Kadrey
Horror/Fantasy
The plot is simple, but the writing is outstanding! After a group of magic workers send the hero to hell, he fights his way back up again to get revenge.
It should have been a graphic novel, but I can see someone picking this up for a mid-season replacement - maybe the guy who is doing Preacher.

These 2 reviews seem to sum it up perfectly...
“An addictively satisfying, deeply amusing, dirty-ass masterpiece.”
—William Gibson
“A sharp-edged urban fantasy, drenched in blood and cynicism, tipping its hat to Sam Peckinpah, Raymond Chandler, and the anti-heroes of Hong Kong cinema….A bravura performance.”
—San Francisco Chronicle
 

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Militant Normal
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10,410 Posts
Finished "Licensed to Lie". Starting in for a second pass. Reads like a fast-paced crime novel, but it's 100% real world lawfare as practiced by the Deep State.
 

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"A Gardener's Year" by H. Rider Haggard.

Similar to "A Farmer's Year" by the same author, which I posted about on July 26th. I finished that one, now I've moved on to this book, which was written a few years later, in 1904.
 

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125 Posts
I'm reading "Bitten". Its a book about ticks and how the government used them for biological warfare and Lyme disease.

I notice a lot of people reading the One Second After series. I've read it twice.
John Hollerman's EMP Equipping Modern Patriots series is also really good if not better. Similar to One Second After but different plot line and thought process. He also doesn't repeat himself like Forestner.
 

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Indefatigable
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The Pyramids And The Pentagon: The Government's Top Secret Pursuit Of Mystical Relics, Ancient Astronauts and Lost Civilizations by Nick Redfern

I can't possibly do a description justice so from the jacket...

Focusing primarily upon the classified work of the U.S. Government, The Pyramids and the Pentagon is a detailed study of how and why government agencies have, for decades, taken a clandestine and profound interest in numerous archeological, historical, and religious puzzles.
 

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The Pyramids And The Pentagon: The Government's Top Secret Pursuit Of Mystical Relics, Ancient Astronauts and Lost Civilizations by Nick Redfern

I can't possibly do a description justice so from the jacket...

Focusing primarily upon the classified work of the U.S. Government, The Pyramids and the Pentagon is a detailed study of how and why government agencies have, for decades, taken a clandestine and profound interest in numerous archeological, historical, and religious puzzles.
The Nazis did the same thing in the 1930s.
 

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Indefatigable
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19,773 Posts
A Cold Day In Paradise by Steve Hamilton
Alex McKnight Series, Book 1

This book was published in 2000 and he won an award for the best new author of the year. I'm not much on whodunits, but I really like the way this guy writes and I am falling in love with his character Alex McKnight. Looks like there are at least a dozen books in this series, I've found a new favorite.

Former Detroit cop turned private eye, moves to UP Michigan to retire. But a local murder case brings back a killer he thought he put behind bars years ago.
 

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"A Gardener's Year" by H. Rider Haggard.

Similar to "A Farmer's Year" by the same author, which I posted about on July 26th. I finished that one, now I've moved on to this book, which was written a few years later, in 1904.
I've been slowly working through this book, but have had a lot of other distractions lately. However, I came across an amusing passage today, which I thought I would share.

As I previously mentioned, H. Rider Haggard is better known for novels such as "King Solomon's Mines" and the Alan Quartermaine series. But he was also an avid gardener and farmer, and often wrote about these subjects as well.

In the book I'm current reading, he describes how he once got into an argument with his head gardener over his desire to exhibit some orchids in an upcoming flower show. The head gardener had never done in that sort of thing before, and didn't want to now. Haggard wrote:

"At length he yielded to my arguments, adding, 'Well, I dare say, like other gentlemen, yew would like to see your name in print for once!' For such he conceived to be the real object of this new departure! I must say that it struck me as strange that he should have been in my service for nearly twenty years and yet remain unaware that my name had appeared in print — occasionally."
 
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