Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for a 1911 that will be used for protecting my home. Problem that I have encountered is the slide! Some slides are very hard to pull back because some 1911's are more tightly put together than others.
Can anyone here recommend a 1911 that is not as tightly put together and still reliable? Semper Fi Till The Day I Die! Thank-You!
 

·
"eleutheromaniac"
Joined
·
3,276 Posts
It is NOT an issue of how tightly the firearm is put together. It is the weight of the spring. The spring has to be heavy enough to not destroy the firearm when the slide slams back. If you want low weight spring get a 1911 chambered in .22 long rifle.

This is a gross over simplification......but the more powerful the cartridge the heavier the spring is required.

Also another factor is the heavier weight bullets or +P+ loads require a heavier spring.

A 1911 chambered in 9mm will have a much lighter spring then a 1911 chambered in 45 auto or a 10mm
 

·
Retired Army
Joined
·
5,533 Posts
I reduced the amount of effort on one of my 1911A1 frames by changing the main spring (hammer spring) not, the recoil spring, to a lighter weight spring (23lbs to 14lbs). More so the .22 adapter that I put on it would function better, than to make it easier for me to pull back. It is, however, easier to pull the slide back.
The problem with doing this for what you are talking about is that when you reduce the hammer spring strength you can also cause mis-fires with .45 ammo.

Al
 

·
More than .0001%
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
Call Wolff Springs and tell them the make, model sidearm and load that you shoot. They can determine and provide the correct Recoil spring weight which may be lighter than what’s currently installed. He may also have other suggestions on how to reduce the amount of force needed to work the slide.

https://www.gunsprings.com/
 

·
Militant Normal
Joined
·
10,410 Posts
I never found them to be all that heavy.

If you thumb the hammer back before you work the slide, it tends to be easier.
AK103 has it right - thumb-cock the hammer first, then work the slide. I have old and arthritic hands, so that's how I do it for my Beretta 92.

All hammer-fired pistols like the 1911 are easier than striker-fired, because the recoil cocks the hammer. Striker-fired guns the recoil spring has to cock the striker, so the recoil springs have to be much heavier. So you're already on the right track with a 1911.

I had a Nazi-marked FN High Power once that was a bear to rack. Sold it. Then I found out that wartime High Powers were sometimes fitted with very strong springs, to cope with certain high pressure wartime ammo. (self-adminsters dope slap). Showing that the selection of spring rate is related to the type of ammo you will use.
 

·
Militant Normal
Joined
·
10,410 Posts
All of them should be easy for most people if they use the proper technique.
Most try to be too gentle and slow.
Normalcy bias is showing. There's a lot of people who just don't have the hand strength typical of yer healthy middle-aged male. Neither technique nor training can overcome that limitation. I know perfectly well how to do it, but when I try to jerk the slide on a Glock it slips out of my grip about 3/4 of the way back. I also flinch from the pain in the wrist of hand holding the grip. Arthritis sucks, and there's no cure.

Let's all hope that the O.P. isn't as far gone.
 

·
What hell, pay attention
Joined
·
7,970 Posts
If it rattles when you shake it, its loose enough - practice throwing it - it will be about that accurate at any distance.
Thats not true. All of mine, and Ive owned a bunch, have rattled when you shook them, and they normally shot quite well.

That little rattle was also usually a sign they would work OK.

You used to often hear a lot of stories that the 1911's were not accurate and hard to shoot well. And thats usually just what they were, stories. :thumb:
 

·
Why do you ask? 2 Dogs!
Joined
·
13,569 Posts
That's one thing I like about mine. When my kids were young, they couldn't pull mine back. I keep it in my night stand drawer, back then, I didn't chamber a round. Now since they've been gone, it's locked and loaded

I never worried about them getting into it cuz they couldn't load it. They never messed with it regardless but it gave me peace of mind
 

·
Live Secret, Live Happy
Joined
·
15,790 Posts
I wanted a target grade 1911, that was built to take heavy loads.
So I cheated. I bought a Sig P220 Elite SAO in 10mm.

I has a beavertail grip, target sights, and a single action trigger. But it is built on stainless frame.
It allows me ro engage the safety, thumb cock the hammer, and then cycle the slide.

It is also built to take a stream light.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
I am looking for a 1911 that will be used for protecting my home. Problem that I have encountered is the slide! Some slides are very hard to pull back because some 1911's are more tightly put together than others.
Can anyone here recommend a 1911 that is not as tightly put together and still reliable? Semper Fi Till The Day I Die! Thank-You!
Like AK103K said pretty much - Thumb the hammer back first. Problem solved! :)
 

·
Museum Piece
Joined
·
312 Posts
There is no 1911 that can compare to a P220, cept maybe the Sig 1911.
I shot only 1911s for 50 years. Then bud had me shoot his P220. Bought it on the spot.
He has been trying to buy it back ever since.
OP is you want a easy slide, to the the CMP website and buy a used rack grade 1911.
You can upgrade it later if you wish. Ive never had any rack grade 1911 in 20 years in the Army I could not hit the 100 yard gong with.
The P220 is cheating at 100 yards, Their slides are tight, Mrs Wire can not even pull it back. Thats why she shoots 357 mag.
 

·
More than .0001%
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
Give this a try.

Instead of pulling the slide back, grip the slide and extend that arm straight, or hold it in a position comfortable for you while extended, then push the Frame fwd while gripping the handle then release the slide once the handle is fully fwd.. This method helped my wife. It’s even easier if the hammer is cocked as mentioned By another post.

Some people grip the slide and hold it close to the body with a bend elbow and then press the handle fwd. Both methods help some people...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,511 Posts
I had a Kimber SIS compact - very short, slide engraved with the letters SIS instead of grip channels at he back end of the slide. At 74 years old, I didn't have grip strength to rack the thing, so I cut out state board tape and put it in the SIS engraving in order to have more tactile feel, and the problem went away. You can do the same thing with the channels on a regular 1922 slide.

WW

shoots straight - stay safe
 
1 - 20 of 59 Posts
Top