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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I took my bug out bag on a walk in the gym two days ago.
I can already hear people asking why the gym, well because I wanted exact nbers of what I could do, and keeping up with the treadmill would help me not give in to the urge to stop

My shins are absolutely wrecked.
For some reason my right shin/leg is worse than the left.

Only 38 pounds for 2 miles. I'm not in the Army anymore nor am I a thru-hiker. I am starting back slow, with the old 12 mile in 3 hour standard as a beginning goal.

Anyone have any tips, or new things I could do to prepare?

Any old pros, Astronomy, Rock6, Evilwhitey, feel free to school me.
 

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Everyday I go for a hike Hour and a half or 2 hours with my my 15 pound survival day pack. When I am out in the desert away from home I had my Rifle of choice. It sounds to me your choice of the Gym to start was a mistake and you over did it. First you should have started without the pack then slowly work on distance and adding weight untill you get to your target pack weight and distence.
Best advice take your time and listen to your body your shins where telling you that your were over doing it before you got shin splints. Thats a mistake too many people make when starting out they set an unreasonable goal the first day and will not stop short of it because they are (How should I put this to not offend) pig headed. Set goals and when you come up short dont let that set you back. Just keep working towards the goal. The important thing is avoiding injuries. That will slow you down and discourage you. Dont put a time frame on your 12 mile goal allow your body to get there when it gets there. Remember there is a big difference between an ache and a pain. Just to clarify your shin splints are a pain. Muscle aches that a little bengay or a hot shower makes feel better is just that an ache. Listen to your body it talks to you.
NDR
 

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I got mobilized during Katrina, but spent my 3 months on-base at Little Creek. Nothing to do, so I'd hit the track for 5 miles every evening. Shin splints within the first week. I worked with a Doc, think he was a psyche, but still had med training. Was fixing his personal computer one evening, so we had time to shoot the breeze. He told me to just suffer through it, and slowly continue to improve. So I'd get out after work and walk the track, over and over, and within a week I was jogging again. Happened in high school as well when I joined cross country ... crappy part was I had to walk home 4 miles after practice.
 

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I'm probably not qualified to give you any advice on this matter, but legendary Finnish Olympic runners Paavo Nurmi and brothers Kolehmainen walked a lot, before running.
A LOT.
From February to late June. There was also some interval training. Forget adding weight on your back for now and build some stamina just by speed walking to withstand the stress, before pushing balls to the wall.

I wish you all the best of luck on your training!
 

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ha, my chins are sore today also. Been slacking lately, so first few walks, Ill feel it. I do conditioning type of hikes, Heavier weight, 4 miles max.

Rucking is terrible for your joints and cartilage, some nights I cant sleep cuz the damage from a previous life hurt so much. We used to do lots of stupid stuff like tons of long rucks, running with rucks, running with body armor. It took a long time before we learned how to do physical conditioning vs. suck fests everyday.

For conditioning once we learned, in or prime we'd do 75lbs 5 miles, as fast and hard as we could go. (without running) You can do all the conditioning you need without doing the long distances. Long distances cause lots of damage to your body so avoid it. Long distances are more for mental conditioning and we did those as needed. and sparingly.

Three miles is good, start off slow until your body is completely warmed up, then settle into your pace that you can maintain for hours. Then finish as hard and fast as you can. (For me and my team a pace we could maintain forever was 10min per kilometer, and that was was with at least 70lbs). Your conditioning so weight is good, so then on your next elk hunt at 8k, or a bugout your body wont feel the minuscule 30lbs. (not saying you need to go 70lbs, but more weight then your planning weight is good)

On other days I have a 100yd inclined driveway, I do sprints, and lunges. Those workouts will get you everywhere you need to go, just work into it slowly, and listen to your joints and tendons.

Funny story, one early morning before light, we were getting ready to move. I couldnt find my winter 70lb ruck, and began to freak out. In Ranger school if you lose a mission essential piece of equipment your out, and get sent home. I enlisted some team members to help me find it, after a bit one of the guys stops and says, your ruck is on your back!
 

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I took my bug out bag on a walk in the gym two days ago.
I can already hear people asking why the gym, well because I wanted exact nbers of what I could do, and keeping up with the treadmill would help me not give in to the urge to stop

My shins are absolutely wrecked.
For some reason my right shin/leg is worse than the left.

Only 38 pounds for 2 miles. I'm not in the Army anymore nor am I a thru-hiker. I am starting back slow, with the old 12 mile in 3 hour standard as a beginning goal.

Anyone have any tips, or new things I could do to prepare?

Any old pros, Astronomy, Rock6, Evilwhitey, feel free to school me.
3 mph or 9 mi/3 hours is standard walking pace without a pack. I’ve been thru-hiking and backpacking for decades logging thousands of miles. 4 mph which is 12 mi/3 hours with a pack for any distance is not reasonable if you want to stay healthy and safe.
 

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Keep a log - time, distance, load, comments. Proper boots and socks for humping a load? I like being on earth not concrete or steel. Your pack weight seems reasonable for an average man, perhaps how you pack it can help with proper posture for load bearing. Maybe have someone video you for 10 minutes at the start, mid point and at the end to see what is going on.
 

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You ARE what you IS!
Prepped enough is NEVER good enough!
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I took my bug out bag on a walk in the gym two days ago.
I can already hear people asking why the gym, well because I wanted exact nbers of what I could do, and keeping up with the treadmill would help me not give in to the urge to stop

My shins are absolutely wrecked.
For some reason my right shin/leg is worse than the left.

Only 38 pounds for 2 miles. I'm not in the Army anymore nor am I a thru-hiker. I am starting back slow, with the old 12 mile in 3 hour standard as a beginning goal.

Anyone have any tips, or new things I could do to prepare?

Any old pros, Astronomy, Rock6, Evilwhitey, feel free to school me.
Brother, it seems like you're going about it just fine. You gotta build up your endurance again. Take into account how much your ruck sack/pack will weigh on an actual ruck either for exercise or the real thing and build up to it. Take it at your own pace comfy to you but make it as realistic as possible both walking and on the treadmill along with adding your hydration requirement factor. Be sure and warm down which is just as important as warming up with stretching before and after. Above all.... don't rush it. The 12 miles in 3 hours is a good goal to achieve and don't exceed it.
 

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Anyone have any tips, or new things I could do to prepare?
Just what almost everyone else has recommended... start slow, carry light weight, don't overdo things, but persevere with your program.

First time back in the saddle and your body is screaming at you. So take two days of rest... then do the same routine again. It'll take a coupla weeks before it seems normal & easy.
 

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As an old Grunt, that's how we started out, low and slow. 5 miles, recovery, 12 miles, recovery,18 miles, recovery. Next thing you know you're hitting 26 miles...and the VA is asking you how did you get so f****ed up.

Carrying a load over distance takes time and patience. Treat your wounds and keep moving.
 

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I think you need to lift some weights. Deadlifts, squats and overhead lifts come to mind. Start with 3 sets of 10 at a comfortable weight and work your way up. Once you get to triple digits, I think you will do better with the rucking. Age should not be an obstacle. Just start with light weights, stick to a training schedule, eat like an athlete, and cut out the bad habits.

Being in strong and in shape is probably the single most important factor in a survival experience.

These people are in there 70s and they still weight train.


 

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ha, my chins are sore today also. Been slacking lately, so first few walks, Ill feel it. I do conditioning type of hikes, Heavier weight, 4 miles max.

Rucking is terrible for your joints and cartilage, some nights I cant sleep cuz the damage from a previous life hurt so much. We used to do lots of stupid stuff like tons of long rucks, running with rucks, running with body armor. It took a long time before we learned how to do physical conditioning vs. suck fests everyday.

For conditioning once we learned, in or prime we'd do 75lbs 5 miles, as fast and hard as we could go. (without running) You can do all the conditioning you need without doing the long distances. Long distances cause lots of damage to your body so avoid it. Long distances are more for mental conditioning and we did those as needed. and sparingly.

Three miles is good, start off slow until your body is completely warmed up, then settle into your pace that you can maintain for hours. Then finish as hard and fast as you can. (For me and my team a pace we could maintain forever was 10min per kilometer, and that was was with at least 70lbs). Your conditioning so weight is good, so then on your next elk hunt at 8k, or a bugout your body wont feel the minuscule 30lbs. (not saying you need to go 70lbs, but more weight then your planning weight is good)

On other days I have a 100yd inclined driveway, I do sprints, and lunges. Those workouts will get you everywhere you need to go, just work into it slowly, and listen to your joints and tendons.

Funny story, one early morning before light, we were getting ready to move. I couldnt find my winter 70lb ruck, and began to freak out. In Ranger school if you lose a mission essential piece of equipment your out, and get sent home. I enlisted some team members to help me find it, after a bit one of the guys stops and says, your ruck is on your back!
Been there and done that got the tshirts. 😂 Being pushed to exhaustion in both body and mind is an art form in itself. In my case I fell asleep with my pack on leaning up against a tree. 😂
 

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I think my hobby of hunting with my hound's and following them on foot instead of using a 4 Wheeler , side x side or riding a horse or mule helps keep my legs and joints in shape. Plus keeps weight off etc. I'm astonished by the # of hunters that get all bent out of shape if the dogs are treed 3 miles away. 6 miles round trip is only a 2 hour evolution.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, went on another walk for two miles with the ten pound sling bag, after a two day rest period to rest the shins.

No issues so far, about to go on another slightly longer walk with the get home bag bag from the truck, 22 pounds.

Will post about results.
 

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I took my bug out bag on a walk in the gym two days ago.
I can already hear people asking why the gym, well because I wanted exact nbers of what I could do, and keeping up with the treadmill would help me not give in to the urge to stop

My shins are absolutely wrecked.
For some reason my right shin/leg is worse than the left.

Only 38 pounds for 2 miles. I'm not in the Army anymore nor am I a thru-hiker. I am starting back slow, with the old 12 mile in 3 hour standard as a beginning goal.

Anyone have any tips, or new things I could do to prepare?

Any old pros, Astronomy, Rock6, Evilwhitey, feel free to school me.
Dude, I feel you. Every time we do a ruck at work, the muscle to the side of my shin bone gets wrecked. My right is worse than my left just like yours. I also deal with foot drop. I'm not sure what the issue is, but I'm moderately flat-footed and feel it might have something to do with my arch (or lack thereof). I know that I use Mineral Ice/Icy Hot rub and a massager once I get home to help with the muscle fatigue/soreness.
 

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Well, went on another walk for two miles with the ten pound sling bag, after a two day rest period to rest the shins.

No issues so far, about to go on another slightly longer walk with the get home bag bag from the truck, 22 pounds.

Will post about results.
If you felt good with 2 miles and 10 pounds. I would stick with that for at least a few weeks. If you start adding weight or distance and over do it again then you are waiting 2 days again backing up. Then I would start by adding short additional distance and not weight. I would get to my target distance than start adding the weight. Basically once you start getting in shape you should be lighter and stronger then adding the weight should not hurt you. Dont expect over night results.
NDR
 
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