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Stack It Deep.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You're thinking about buying a truck for bugout. You've got plans to put a monster grate on the front bumper, and just plow through the thousands of vehicles stuck on the road after they run out of gas/EMP hits them/etc. Better yet, just drive over them. Your tires are a grand a piece, and now it's time to put that money to use!

How realistic is this? If you are in a city of any size, there is no realism to such fiction.

You're drawing up plans on how to get to your BOL, using your 4x4. You have driven the routes and know every alternate route, through fields, through farm land, through the trees, in the sticks, over fences, over rocks, etc. Whatever it takes to get there.

How realistic is this? There is no realism here, either. Guts, yes, but no sense of reality.

Big trucks with 100 gallons of fuel, monster swampers, quasi-legal lift, on-board GPS, fridge, DVD player and heated seats are great for playing. I've got one. They are a blast. However, 100 miles of highway clogged with stalled vehicles, as wide as the road itself, will prevent you from reaching your BOL. Fencing of various kinds will snag in your running gear, rip out your shocks, pop your tires and render you dead in the water... just another refugee on foot.

The road is blocked with cars, even on the shoulders... hey, this is my county, I know every farm and even when they're dry enough to cross. I'll just make my own exit here and get back on the highway when traffic lightens up. You get across a field. Then another. Then another. Cars on side streets, waiting in traffic, all stare at you, in envy. A few even try to follow you, and get stuck within feet of the highway. More refugees on foot. You laugh. This is fun! 4x4 in action, baby! Then you see it... a tree stump about a foot taller than your front dif. Then you feel it take out your running gear. You are so fvcked. Welcome to the refugee line, waiting at the Red Cross tent for your Top Ramen, toilet paper and ticket for the bus to FEMA camp. Guess you'll never know how that Mountain House food up at your BOL will taste. It's OK, someone will.

Yes, this is a devils-advocate post. But I put it here to balance what I see as euphoria among some posters who think such solutions as evac to a BOL are as simple as buying stuff and practicing the route.

Look guys, my 4x4 is prepped too, OK? It's prudent to do so, and I applaud your preps. However, pie-in-the-sky plans to make an escape from any city AFTER an event are just a waste of braintime. It ain't happening.

You have to leave before the masses hit the roads. That means leaving at a time when you will get more laughs at your paranoia than looks of envy at your ability. Deal with your ego, decide to leave before anyone else, then practice doing so, all the way to your BOL and back again.
 

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Compelling post, and I agree. It really boils down to preparedness, you need to be able to leave you home within a few hours when everyone else takes 10. Keep all your bug out gear in rubber maid bins that can be tossed in the back of your truck and get on your way.

It also helps to know where you are aswell, in my area there are a lot of improvised roads between my BOL and me, which will become alternatives to the highway.

And beyond all that is smart crawling. If you end up in a situation where you can and do have to go offroad, at no point should you be going fast enough for a stump to take out your drive train. Just put it in 4-LO and take it nice and easy.




For me, personally, I'm going to bug out as soon as the gubment decides people can't be trusted with their fire arms, or can't be trusted to leave their homes/neighborhoods. Anything short of that isn't enough for me to justify leaving my hundreds of thousands of dollars of property behind.
 

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i looked over the diff routes out of the city for a long time and drive the diff routes need to get into the area of the cabin in white mountains area..

i know that a lot of the roads are going to be cloged and unuseable in the long run and made plans to go around the areas ..

the plan was useing a large combo street and drit enduro style of bike fitted with saddle bags along with a custon over the seat bag with a steel frame unit to hold the saddle bags and the plastic crate for supplies that was bunged corded down for travel supplies for travel ...that was stored at someone garage and we would bring the over road binders and use them as need ...that way we had the travel binders in the rubbermaid stowage units to make sure we had diff supplies that where need to make the trip along with if could make out another way we would go that route also ..

the binders route maps was design to fit inside the top of a gas tank stowage bag to show us the route as need with each rest stop the route maps could be check and replaced with a diff unit if we found that way where going blocked and had to take a diff route ..

both our bikes carryed food items and camping gear along with a 2.gallon sized gas can for the trip in the two side bags. and plastic crate unit ,,the crate held the tents and other camping items if we need to stay overnight somewhere along with the way the two saddle bags where a 2-gallon sized gas can rode on each bag top on a frame unit ..the saddle bags where made out of sheetmetal and with squared shaped with the lid acted as a gas can stowage slot with a bunge cord tie down unit on the saddle bag ..

we did the trip useing the route to the northern Az white mountains area it was along ride for it last about 13 hours the way we went ..normaly it would take about 6.1/2.hours to get to the cabin from my place in LA area with evening rush hour traffic that was leaving about 10.pm at night to let the rush hour die down a little..

we had cold weather rideing suits and helmets and gloves along with leg holster for the pistol to wear as need ..

plus i figure out what i thought to be where the major blockage of the freeway system out of the LA area where from the looking at diff maps of the highway system from the northridge quake along with trying to figure out the diff areas that are going to be natural clog points and try to go north or south intill i am away from then over onto a older state road to bypass the major highways useing the dirt bike plan ..
 

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i would like to add to that statement i was sore and stiff from the ride but it could be done ..we did in the middle of a summer in a 4th of july weekend to do the drill and we did but it took a little longer than we planed that day ..
 

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Prepared
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A lot of people in my neighborhood have motorcycles and snowmobiles also, which (depending on time of year) could be a lot more useful for personal transport than a big 4x4. You can ride a motorcross cycle or snowmobile almost like a mechanized replacement to the horse.

Freeways will be massively clogged. I have no doubt in my mind that there will be stalled cars, imbecile drivers, accidents, etc. clogging up miles of highway. All it really takes is just a few cars to clog or bottleneck an entire section. It's like this during ordinary rush hour on a bad day.

I'm not even planning on using the highways. I'd say county and backcountry roads, a box full of maps, GPS, compass, and mobile communications setup (cell phone, CB and/or amateur radio) is your friend in obtaining traffic information before you're caught in the middle of it.

Think of "ordinary" road rage. Now imagine that you've got tens of thousands of city people trying to evacuate, and some moron up ahead blocking the entire highway because he face-planted into a median, is driving at 10 mph because he left the bifocals at home, ran out of gas, etc. And do you want to waste your gas by idling? No, so you probably turn off your engine too. Big parking lot. And maybe some unfriendly people roaming up and down the shoulder on foot, bike, or motorcycle. Not where anyone wants to be.
 

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I honestly do not plan on going anywhere unless I have to. In my case this will be small floods but high enough to get into houses or wind storms/ ice storms which my state has seen a n increase in the last two years. My truck is high enough to get over downed trees and limbs and high enough to get across some flooded streets as long as its not a flowing river. And if this never happens well then its still just my toy and way to keep people from blinding me with their bright lights.
 

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www.GuerillaTactical.com
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Just use your best judgement when bugging out. I personally will be bugging in for a week or so to let the morons expose themselves first, then use my exit strategy to get out of dodge. I have all the fire roads etc to memory and the maps in the jeep. It wont be crazy 4x4ing and will be much less traveled. And yes, I do have a bull bar on the front of my jeep jest in case I need to do any pushing.
 

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Good post. It is always good for us to give negative/realistic reviews of our bugout plans. Like the typical scenarios," gonna take on the whole Zombie horde wit' my ar, my BOL can sustain 5 people for a year, my BOV is the best mudder out there and I'm gonna plow right thru the fields" . Back on subject , the key with BOV is know when to get out EARLY, know multiple routes for BO and access any potiential choke pionts/ threat of traffic beefore you have to go. If you have to live in/near a large urban area select a location that is not constricted by waterways. My old home town had just a land border on 3 sides .
 

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Instead of, or in addition to, a 4x4

Well, you can load up a bicycle with a fair load, plus your backpack. Panniers are definitely your friend for this. Even if you're not always riding, pushing a bike increases the amount of supplies you can carry.

You certainly can't carry as much as you can with a vehicle, but you can carry more than you could on your back and you won't run out of gas.

Along this line of thought, it might be a good idea to check out the train tracks in your area. This would avoid most roads, (except for road crossings), train tracks have minor grades, and they have bridges that many may not think of at the outset of a problem.

Just another possibility to consider instead of trying to zoom out of town in a big 4x4, where numerous types of mechanical failure could leave you on foot. (And if you do start out with a vehicle, I would recommend having a bike on board, just in case.)

GB7
 

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I'm right on the coast, so in an absolute worst case scenario, I can drive along the beach for 40 miles north or south. There's nothing for me at the end of that drive though except more people and clogged roads so there's really no point. But I could if I had to.

I'm bugging in for as long as I've got a house still standing.

If I have to get my wife and kids out, my mom is a pilot and my sister's boss has two private jets and the local airport is 20 minutes away on surface streets.
 

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www.GuerillaTactical.com
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Well, you can load up a bicycle with a fair load, plus your backpack. Panniers are definitely your friend for this. Even if you're not always riding, pushing a bike increases the amount of supplies you can carry.

You certainly can't carry as much as you can with a vehicle, but you can carry more than you could on your back and you won't run out of gas.

Along this line of thought, it might be a good idea to check out the train tracks in your area. This would avoid most roads, (except for road crossings), train tracks have minor grades, and they have bridges that many may not think of at the outset of a problem.

Just another possibility to consider instead of trying to zoom out of town in a big 4x4, where numerous types of mechanical failure could leave you on foot. (And if you do start out with a vehicle, I would recommend having a bike on board, just in case.)

GB7
+1 on the bike idea. Mine will be coming with me for sure.
 

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Taking off across country would never work well in the Rockies, because of the steep, rocky terrain. You would be much better off if you have a good topo map, copies of your AO, and alternate routes. And, like in the previous posts here, drive them NOW to know the road conditions. Ranchers around here don't take to strangers 4x4-ing across their property.
 

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are we there yet??
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I would have probably agreed with this 100% until I saw the Gulf Coast evacuation three years ago. The people that ran out of gas just pulled onto the shoulder of the road and waited. The ditches where perfectly clear even with three million people all trying to go the same way. They were clear because they were muddy and most people's vehicles would get stuck easily.

I could see where in some parts of the country there is not much of a ditch on each side of the road but I built my Jeep for doing the job here. I have no intention to try to run over a couple of million cars on the road, just go around them. I hope I never have to try it out because we should all be gone by that point and time before the people realize it.
 

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Stack It Deep.
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The people that ran out of gas just pulled onto the shoulder of the road and waited.
Sometimes, the shoulder is all there is between the fence and the road. Often, there is no ditch. And it only takes 100 feet of no-ditch and well-jammed-up shoulder to render a hundred miles of highway dead.

Pushing cars off the highway, all the way to a BOL, would be pure fantasy.
 

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Grand Poobah of Sarcasm
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If I was silly enough to live in the big city. I would look real close at bicycle, pedestrian trails. Even out here in the boonies some of these towns have lots of them. I would be real tempted to use a quad runner or motorcycle on them to bug out. I don't think the park police are going to have time to deal with you.
Of course I just like the idea of a troop of quad runner cavalry headed out of town!
Look and see if you have an abandoned rail line that has been turned into a bike trail. Sometimes they go a long ways. I know they are talking about putting an 80 mile long one to Great Falls MT. I am sure other places have similar routes.
 
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